6

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Good online source what various body sensations mean--regarding digestion and health?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 28, 2011 at 12:39 AM

I'm trying to figure out what macronutrients work best for me and trying to pay closer attention to what different "signs" mean that my body makes after I eat.

For example, I notice that a high fat meal is a bit uncomfortable in my lower bowels towards the end the digestion process. I don't know if this means anything other than that I do better on a lower fat diet.

I often know that something is a little wrong after I've eaten but I'd like to try and figure out which thing it is--whether I ate too much starch, too much protein or say, ate too fast.

I'm also wondering what different kinds of gas mean. There's gas right after a meal then the more deadly gas some time (hours) later.

I'd like to understand my bodies cues in a more nuanced way, if possible.

Anyone have any experience with this or sites online that talk about this?

I've had this interest a long time. As a kid my brother and I came up with a code of flavors for various farts. And I don't think we were the only ones!

Thanks much

Medium avatar

(19479)

on November 01, 2011
at 11:00 PM

Glad you liked my initial response! I absolutely did not answer your question, but I felt compelled to comment and am happy that it was at least interesting!

Medium avatar

(19479)

on November 01, 2011
at 10:59 PM

Regarding different types of gas, I would be pointing (or should I say "pulling") the finger at the impact a given food has on the bacteria residing in ones gut. Give your gut bacteria a lot of food, and you will have a lot of gas. If a particular food feeds a particular type of bacteria, i.e. bacteria that produces sulferous metabolic waste vs those that produces more indole compounds, you will get a particular smell, volume, etc.

3fc07ff31006b1860083f0cfe4472ae4

(561)

on November 01, 2011
at 08:45 PM

It's pretty interesting what you say about our perceptions not being strict indicators. It makes me think of a 40 year old "healthy" friend who got breast cancer but couldn't get her head around it cos she felt fine (thankfully early stage). We can't really know exactly what all that racket is inside us. Fascinating stuff. Thanks for writing.

3fc07ff31006b1860083f0cfe4472ae4

(561)

on November 01, 2011
at 08:45 PM

I've been offline a few days and came back to this super interesting response! FED, Your answer mostly makes sense to me, but don't you think different kinds of gas have relatively predictable plumbing and chemistry? I realize there could be nuances of each "sensation episode" due to endless variables in body chemistry and foods, moods, cooking techniques, organisms on food but I wonder if there are some rough guidelines.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on October 28, 2011
at 07:02 PM

Peter D'Adamo, we meet again.

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on October 28, 2011
at 06:49 PM

I like this answer. It's deeeeeeeep

345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on October 28, 2011
at 03:52 PM

love the question! I'd love to know what the 'clues' actually mean because sometimes my body doesn't always say what it means consistently!!!

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2 Answers

1
Medium avatar

(19479)

on October 28, 2011
at 06:44 PM

This is a tricky question and while I don't have any specific answers to the question at hand, I'd like to make a blanket statement in the same general category of thought.

While most of us like the idea that our body will "let us know" what it needs, I think that more often than not our sensations/intuitions/reactions are artifacts of radically different environment and ecology (both macro and micro).

We essentially "fly by wire" and are, in a very literal sense, incapable of perceiving the world directly.

All of our senses take in as much information as they are capable of, and our brain then interprets the results. Our consciousness is then fed the interpretation in the form of what we see, hear, feel, smell, and taste.

This isn't to say that our body CAN'T give us useful information, but I do encourage discretion in how far we depend on body sensation as a reliable index of cause and effect.

This notion can be uncomfortable as our illusory concept of "reality" is very convincing, but there various ways that we can remind ourselves that this is in fact the case.

For example...

good-online-source-what-various-body-sensations-mean--regarding-digestion-and-health?

"In this illusion, the coloured regions appear rather different, roughly orange and brown. In fact they are the same colour, and in identical immediate surrounds, but the brain changes its assumption about colour due to the global interpretation of the surrounding image. Also, the white tiles that are shadowed are the same colour as the grey tiles outside the shadow."

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optical_illusion

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on October 28, 2011
at 06:49 PM

I like this answer. It's deeeeeeeep

Medium avatar

(19479)

on November 01, 2011
at 11:00 PM

Glad you liked my initial response! I absolutely did not answer your question, but I felt compelled to comment and am happy that it was at least interesting!

3fc07ff31006b1860083f0cfe4472ae4

(561)

on November 01, 2011
at 08:45 PM

I've been offline a few days and came back to this super interesting response! FED, Your answer mostly makes sense to me, but don't you think different kinds of gas have relatively predictable plumbing and chemistry? I realize there could be nuances of each "sensation episode" due to endless variables in body chemistry and foods, moods, cooking techniques, organisms on food but I wonder if there are some rough guidelines.

3fc07ff31006b1860083f0cfe4472ae4

(561)

on November 01, 2011
at 08:45 PM

It's pretty interesting what you say about our perceptions not being strict indicators. It makes me think of a 40 year old "healthy" friend who got breast cancer but couldn't get her head around it cos she felt fine (thankfully early stage). We can't really know exactly what all that racket is inside us. Fascinating stuff. Thanks for writing.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on November 01, 2011
at 10:59 PM

Regarding different types of gas, I would be pointing (or should I say "pulling") the finger at the impact a given food has on the bacteria residing in ones gut. Give your gut bacteria a lot of food, and you will have a lot of gas. If a particular food feeds a particular type of bacteria, i.e. bacteria that produces sulferous metabolic waste vs those that produces more indole compounds, you will get a particular smell, volume, etc.

-1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on October 28, 2011
at 05:47 PM

Get your blood type and genotype information from Peter D'Adamo. It is wayyyy more accurate than paleo. I for example am a blood type O Hunter genotype. So I eat pure paleo more or less most of the time. Using his food lists I don't have digestive problems or reactions to really anything I eat, ever. I don't worry as much about "macronutrient ratios" and simply eat high protein/moderate-high fat/lower carb most days since that is what is best for my genotype.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on October 28, 2011
at 07:02 PM

Peter D'Adamo, we meet again.

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