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About Blue Light LEDs...

Answered on August 04, 2014
Created August 02, 2014 at 3:52 AM

A lot is being said recently about how blue light LEDs have a similar effect to caffeine, and how effective it is at both disrupting your sleep schedule at night, as well as fixing it, by helping keeping you awake during the day.

So, I would like to ask the following to those more knowledgeable on the subject: Are white colored LEDs the same thing as actual blue colored LEDs, or is one more or less effective than the other? And for sleeping at night, would choosing a dimmed yellow, orange, red color on one of those custom color remote controlled LEDs be enough to stop the blue light effect without having to resort to goggles?

5c8849f93f97a042f246bfa3534f93c7

on August 03, 2014
at 06:11 PM

It's still a bit difficult for me to go the pitch black route yet. I also have a pretty potent insomnia, which makes sleeping difficult, regardless of my lighting setup.

I currently use a standard white light which I turn off close to bedtime, and a standard orange/yellow light. I'm thinking about buying a LED white light for the energy saving, and possibly the stronger blue light effect (my standard light is a bit on the weak side). I also agree; blue lights can be very useful if you use them at the right times, which is something I'm still trying to get used to.

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4 Answers

0
5c8849f93f97a042f246bfa3534f93c7

on August 04, 2014
at 05:45 AM

@raydawg

Sorry, but just a couple more questions on the subject; bearing in mind I can't really turn off all the devices and light in my room, would using sleep masks work for getting that pitch black effect in a room with just one dim orange/yellow non LED light + all the lights from the various electronics that can't be turned off, or are regular sleep masks insufficient to fully block the blue light at night? Would orange colored goggles be better? There's no amazon nor uvex orange goggles (there are generic no name orange goggles, however) where I live, so sleep masks would be the easiest for me to get.

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96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on August 03, 2014
at 11:58 AM

@Unfrozen_Grok

As long as they contain the blue wavelength, and white light does, it's still a problem. You can use orange lights to help limit the effect at night, but once you want to sleep, it should be pitch black.

You can switch out your bedside lamp bulb to orange or red if you want to read a little bit before bed, that's what I do, and I get sleepy very easily at that point, but that won't work if you're using a tablet that has its own light source (i.e. not e-paper). In that case F. Lux or equivalent will help.

Blue light isn't evil or bad, you just want to have it in the morning and avoid it at night. If anything it's very energizing and helpful in the winter.

5c8849f93f97a042f246bfa3534f93c7

on August 03, 2014
at 06:11 PM

It's still a bit difficult for me to go the pitch black route yet. I also have a pretty potent insomnia, which makes sleeping difficult, regardless of my lighting setup.

I currently use a standard white light which I turn off close to bedtime, and a standard orange/yellow light. I'm thinking about buying a LED white light for the energy saving, and possibly the stronger blue light effect (my standard light is a bit on the weak side). I also agree; blue lights can be very useful if you use them at the right times, which is something I'm still trying to get used to.

0
5c8849f93f97a042f246bfa3534f93c7

on August 03, 2014
at 11:35 AM

Ah, Thanks; I just thought it was the same as blue light because of it using max RGB settings to produce that white color.

A question though; does that mean that even using a purely red colored LED is the same thing as using a white one too? I figured you could do something similar to f.lux by just switching to red, orange, yellow on multi-colored, remote controlled LEDs in the room. Also, do the more traditional lights have the same effect as the blue light regardless of color, like LED, or only if they're actually blue?

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on August 02, 2014
at 06:04 PM

Yes, they're the same. White color LEDs are really blue LEDs that strike a phosphor layer which changes the light to white. It's best to have NO LEDs at all, of any color and sleep in a pitch black room. If you must have devices in your bedroom cover them with black electrical tape or other covers to keep them from being visible.

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