1

votes

How to interpet blood sugar results?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 25, 2011 at 3:12 AM

I'll say up front that I'm going to repeat the test with a more rigorous attention to certain details but I would like to know if anyone else got this kind of response when using a glucose meter to measure blood glucose:

I really want to know more about how carbs affect me and how fast I recover after eating them (ie insulin spikes/insulin resistance)

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 17, 2011
at 07:37 AM

If you had a lower blood sugar reading after eating that just makes me think you have some fabulous insulin sensitivity, the insulin came through, picked up all the sugar, and put it where it was supposed to go very quickly.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 17, 2011
at 07:32 AM

I flippin, hate that test. Do you feel dizzy after eating? If not, seriously doubt you have GB. Were you really athletic and carb loading before pregnancy? I noticed that most of my friend's who were mountain climbers and hikers failed the glucose test. Don't know why that is though, just an odd coincidence? I was even more perplexed that chubby insulin resistant me passed it. I think my midwives may have helped me pass it though because they had me eat a HUGE salad for breakfast with a whole can of beans and a can of salmon on it. Personally, I think you should go for a retest.

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on July 08, 2011
at 11:56 PM

meters can also be inaccurate in that they can be reflecting a BS that is about 15 to 45 mins old compared to what is actually happening in your body. Whats the use of knowing what your BS was 45 mins ago. It would be nice if meter gave trending report with the reading.

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on July 08, 2011
at 11:49 PM

Eating low carb can make you temporarily glucose intolerent so giving your body a large dose will cause you to fail.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 25, 2011
at 09:47 PM

Thanks:) I have time and the interest to keep working on this project. I'm fascinated by the details of the paleo/primal diet. Mainly I want to know how carbs affect me so I can limit them when it's prudent to do so. I'm not actively trying to lose weight, but am finding myself curious about how to judge the real health benefits of LC and VLC. I don't want to do anything that is inflammatory but want my body to run well. Well it's all just so darn interesting. Thanks again for the help.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on March 25, 2011
at 05:52 PM

Nothing in that meal (except maybe the chocolate) would really drive BS up quickly. The slow rise over several hours would be due the protein. Protein also causes a rise in BS, but much more slowly (except whey powder - which is pretty quick). Most glucometers are only accurate +/-10 anyways... Your BS can go down before going up in response to food as insulin is released before digestion really gets going.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on March 25, 2011
at 05:51 PM

Nothing in that meal (except maybe the chocolate) to really drive BS up quickly. The slow rise over several hours would be due the protein. Protein also causes a rise in BS, but much more slowly (except whey powder - which is pretty quick). Most glucometers are only accurate +/-10 anyways... Your BS can go down before going up in response to food as insulin is released before digestion really gets going.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 25, 2011
at 07:19 AM

I'm curious because I'd like to keep my carbs at a healthy level for me. The "ate more carbs than usual" refers to eating about 150 grams of carbohydrate for 3 days prior to testing blood sugar if you've been eating low carb like I have for the past 6 weeks. I guess it's hard to analyze blood sugar test accurately if you go from low to high in one day. I'm definitely no expert. I thought I'd get a standard reaction. Low/normal numbers before eating in the morning. Much higher after eating and lower each hour after. My results being higher before eating seemed strange. Hence the question.

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4 Answers

1
D63f6523e79d218ba7b076cc10d89453

(30)

on April 21, 2011
at 03:39 AM

I have a question and Im hoping someone can shed some light on this for me. My appt with a Dietician is not for a while and I would like some answers now. With my first pregnancy, I failed the one hour glucose test so they referred me to the 3 hour test. They told me to eat a diet filled with carbs and I did that and passed the three hour test. Now with my third pregnanct, I failed the one hour test. I forgot how long they told me I should not eat for and I ate at noon and my test was at three. I also ate something really small, I think a small croissant with a piece of turkey. So my first question is did my glucose level go up because I took the test three hours after eating something really small?? My other question is that they didnt instruct me to carb load for the three hour test this time (different Dr) so I actually ate very little the day before bc I was so stressed. I ended up with a normal fasting score of 89 but failed all the other scores afterwards. Now I am diagnosed with GD bc my scores were so high. Any input will be appreciated.

6371f0ae0c075ded1b8cd30aafd4bf16

on July 08, 2011
at 11:49 PM

Eating low carb can make you temporarily glucose intolerent so giving your body a large dose will cause you to fail.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 17, 2011
at 07:32 AM

I flippin, hate that test. Do you feel dizzy after eating? If not, seriously doubt you have GB. Were you really athletic and carb loading before pregnancy? I noticed that most of my friend's who were mountain climbers and hikers failed the glucose test. Don't know why that is though, just an odd coincidence? I was even more perplexed that chubby insulin resistant me passed it. I think my midwives may have helped me pass it though because they had me eat a HUGE salad for breakfast with a whole can of beans and a can of salmon on it. Personally, I think you should go for a retest.

0
2b8c327d1296a96ad64cdadc7dffa72d

on March 25, 2011
at 05:47 PM

David makes a very good point about how long it takes for BG to stabilize after implementing dietary changes. Since you don't have diabetes Laura, it's going to take some detective work for more than one day, and at varying daily carb levels (of non-grain based carbs) to find out how your body really reacts.

Since you don't have diabetes, you might consider working with some of the carb levels defined in Mark Sisson's Primal Blueprint. It's going to take several months to find the level that works for you that you're happy doing for the long haul.

And, since you are a woman, your monthly cycle WILL have an effect on the values you get as well as how you feel in general. If you're up to the task, set aside 1 month of eating at 1 carb level, then cycle down for another month, etc. until you reach the level that you feel good and get numbers that work for you, bearing in mind all that I told you above of the factors that go into your BG level. Also know that every home BG monitor is off by up to 20%. Laboratory meters are have a 7-10% error/variance.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 25, 2011
at 09:47 PM

Thanks:) I have time and the interest to keep working on this project. I'm fascinated by the details of the paleo/primal diet. Mainly I want to know how carbs affect me so I can limit them when it's prudent to do so. I'm not actively trying to lose weight, but am finding myself curious about how to judge the real health benefits of LC and VLC. I don't want to do anything that is inflammatory but want my body to run well. Well it's all just so darn interesting. Thanks again for the help.

0
93b2e3c143c962cf8c92e6316a483ddf

(150)

on March 25, 2011
at 03:27 PM

The eating of 150g of carbs prior to testing does not apply to using a glucose meter. That is just in preparation for a glucose tolerance test in which you drink a formula that is many times more carbs than you are used to eating (and are therefore resistant to processing). So forget about carb loading before you test. Most non-diabetics have a fasting blood sugar in the 80's or low 90's, though some long term low carbers may be around 100, but don't go much higher. In general, a non-diabetic will have a sugar level of 120 or less two hours after eating. To see how you are doing, or to test for how your body handles a particular food, test before you eat it and then again at one hour and at two hours after eating.

I have been diabetic for 26 years and, due to a very low carb version of "paleo" now have fasting blood sugars in the 80's and rarely go above 110 (but it took over two years of eating this way to achieve that).

0
2b8c327d1296a96ad64cdadc7dffa72d

on March 25, 2011
at 05:27 AM

There are many factors that determine your blood glucose readings - insulin sensitivity (which tends to increase after exercise, but can DECREASE if your exercise is particularly stressful), hormone activity, (Cortisol, DHEA, estrogen, testosterone and others), your overall stress level, and rate of stomach emptying (full digestive pattern). And, of course, knowing that you BG level will NEVER be constant at one measure throughout the day.

Based on your readings, what are you particularly concerned about? Your cortisol does not necessarily decrease (much) in the morning if those levels are high. Could be your cortisol dropped by the time you had lunch.

I wonder what you're really trying to achieve by measuring your glucose. I get you're saying you want to know how carbs affect you, but sometimes folks get a bit carried away with the numbers, especially if they do NOT have diabetes. The best thing is to keep a journal and note ALL of the effects, including emotional, hunger signals, etc.

What does "more carbs than usual" mean, and what was the source of that carbohydrate? Remember that carbs are not the only macronutrient to affect BG. Protein has an effect as well, and FAT very little.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 25, 2011
at 07:19 AM

I'm curious because I'd like to keep my carbs at a healthy level for me. The "ate more carbs than usual" refers to eating about 150 grams of carbohydrate for 3 days prior to testing blood sugar if you've been eating low carb like I have for the past 6 weeks. I guess it's hard to analyze blood sugar test accurately if you go from low to high in one day. I'm definitely no expert. I thought I'd get a standard reaction. Low/normal numbers before eating in the morning. Much higher after eating and lower each hour after. My results being higher before eating seemed strange. Hence the question.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 17, 2011
at 07:37 AM

If you had a lower blood sugar reading after eating that just makes me think you have some fabulous insulin sensitivity, the insulin came through, picked up all the sugar, and put it where it was supposed to go very quickly.

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