2

votes

Does consuming animal blood provide benefits to human blood?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 04, 2013 at 12:40 AM

Eating animal bones such as in broth or gelatin is good for our bones and joints. Eating animal muscles is good for building our muscles. Is this true for just about any part of the animal? Is eating animal blood good for our blood?

And as an aside: Is there a corollary for plant parts to human parts?

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b

(1031)

on January 04, 2013
at 09:17 AM

There is a long history of consuming blood. I suspect there is definite nutritional value in it and little down side. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_pudding

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on January 04, 2013
at 05:19 AM

I keep looking in grocery store coolers for it, but I never can find it.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 04, 2013
at 04:50 AM

Legit references please. Googling so far has only turned up utter BS.

C657d176db6f11f98aeb2a89071e3281

(842)

on January 04, 2013
at 04:16 AM

I am not sure if it's nonsense. I know from personal experience of two people having chlorophyll transfusions instead of blood. Blood was not available in one and in the other person's experience, his doctor recommended it. It is definitely interesting.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 04, 2013
at 02:07 AM

A lot of nonsense in those links you've provided. There's a lot more to blood than just heme.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on January 04, 2013
at 02:02 AM

Actually, the pH of most animal blood is slightly alkaline.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on January 04, 2013
at 01:52 AM

Chlorophyll is quite similar to hemoglobin except instead of having a molecule of iron in it, it has magnesium.

564468f093b36d9cdeb8adb138446363

(188)

on January 04, 2013
at 01:09 AM

Er, especially on a cellular level.

564468f093b36d9cdeb8adb138446363

(188)

on January 04, 2013
at 01:07 AM

Thanks for the first link. The second one is pretty silly. There's such a direct link between consumption of animal parts and benefit to our same parts that I do wonder if there's any similarity with plants.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on January 04, 2013
at 12:52 AM

I should point out the second link is based on the resemblance of plant parts to human parts, not plant parts with a the same or similar function to human parts.

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3 Answers

1
C657d176db6f11f98aeb2a89071e3281

on January 04, 2013
at 01:48 AM

Actually, the make-up of chlorophyll is most similar to our blood. From what I understand, one may have chlorophyll transfusions and avoid the chance of contamination from another person's blood.

http://ahha.org/articles.asp?Id=26

http://articlesofhealth.blogspot.com/2006/11/blood-transfusions-with-chlorophyll.html

Considering that the blood of an animal is most acidic, I am not sure that there is a benefit to us consuming it.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 04, 2013
at 04:50 AM

Legit references please. Googling so far has only turned up utter BS.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 04, 2013
at 02:07 AM

A lot of nonsense in those links you've provided. There's a lot more to blood than just heme.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on January 04, 2013
at 02:02 AM

Actually, the pH of most animal blood is slightly alkaline.

C657d176db6f11f98aeb2a89071e3281

(842)

on January 04, 2013
at 04:16 AM

I am not sure if it's nonsense. I know from personal experience of two people having chlorophyll transfusions instead of blood. Blood was not available in one and in the other person's experience, his doctor recommended it. It is definitely interesting.

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on January 04, 2013
at 01:52 AM

Chlorophyll is quite similar to hemoglobin except instead of having a molecule of iron in it, it has magnesium.

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on January 04, 2013
at 02:04 AM

Blood is a good source of bioavailable iron.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on January 04, 2013
at 05:19 AM

I keep looking in grocery store coolers for it, but I never can find it.

0
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on January 04, 2013
at 12:48 AM

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on January 04, 2013
at 12:52 AM

I should point out the second link is based on the resemblance of plant parts to human parts, not plant parts with a the same or similar function to human parts.

564468f093b36d9cdeb8adb138446363

(188)

on January 04, 2013
at 01:09 AM

Er, especially on a cellular level.

564468f093b36d9cdeb8adb138446363

(188)

on January 04, 2013
at 01:07 AM

Thanks for the first link. The second one is pretty silly. There's such a direct link between consumption of animal parts and benefit to our same parts that I do wonder if there's any similarity with plants.

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