2

votes

lab test ranges

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 23, 2011 at 1:39 AM

I have seen it mentioned in a few places that the 'normal ranges' on the lab values for blood tests are not optimal. One reason may be that sick people are the ones most often having blood tests run.

For example 65-99 mg/dl is "normal" for fasting glucose but I think most of us would consider anything over 90 to be high.

What other tests should have different 'healthy' ranges? And what would you suggest those ranges be?

Medium avatar

(39831)

on September 24, 2011
at 07:07 PM

I think the goal should be below 1.0, which shouldn't really be possible without I and Se supplementation.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 24, 2011
at 03:51 PM

Yeah I've noticed you leaning towards lower TSH levels in other posts on here. How low? Mine came back at 0.3. http://paleohacks.com/questions/66778/hack-my-thyroid-panel-please#axzz1YsyQobPn

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 23, 2011
at 02:24 PM

yeah, I was hoping for some paleohacks' optimal ranges

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 23, 2011
at 02:23 PM

I was looking for some new 'optimal ranges' if possible

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 23, 2011
at 05:22 AM

The narrower ranges are helpful for hypothyroid patients trying to get treated properly.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 23, 2011
at 02:17 AM

I do wonder if drug companies were pushing for the narrower ranges to sell more drugs though

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on September 23, 2011
at 02:16 AM

It's like the physical requirement for the military, etc. People can't hack it so just amend the standards.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 23, 2011
at 02:07 AM

that's interesting. I just got a test back and my TSH was 0.303 and the lab norms are still listed at .45-4.5

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6 Answers

1
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on October 08, 2011
at 12:29 AM

Labs can change reference levels based upon their testing methods.....groups of specialist will make large scale recommendation of what constitutes normal laboratory values after consensus meetings. This is what has occured in endocrinology recently with TSH levels and what has gone on with cardiologists since 1984 by consistently dropping LDL levels and calling them the new normal. Just because consensus changes does not mean it is correct for the individual. This is where clinical experience meets the road.

0
Medium avatar

on September 24, 2011
at 12:05 AM

I would wager that nearly all of the ones on a metabolic panel or urinalysis are roughly correct but all of the optimal hormone ranges are off. I think TSH should be lower, T3 should be higher, vitamin D should be higher, and estrogen in females and testosterone in males should be higher than what's considered to be normal.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on September 24, 2011
at 07:07 PM

I think the goal should be below 1.0, which shouldn't really be possible without I and Se supplementation.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 24, 2011
at 03:51 PM

Yeah I've noticed you leaning towards lower TSH levels in other posts on here. How low? Mine came back at 0.3. http://paleohacks.com/questions/66778/hack-my-thyroid-panel-please#axzz1YsyQobPn

0
E91fd339d760ed76cc72570a679ebf5a

(2369)

on September 23, 2011
at 11:17 PM

I have no idea what the paleosphere's consensus is on this guy, but Dr. Bruce Rind has a theory about optimal thyroid levels:

Test Lab Low Optimal Range Lab High TSH 0.5 1.3-1.8 5.0 Free T4 0.8 1.2-1.3 1.8 Free T3 230 320-330 420 Free T3* 2.3 3.2-3.3 4.2 *Some labs divide FT3 results by 100 thus 230 is the same as 2.3, etc.

More info here: http://www.drrind.com/therapies/thyroid-scale

0
Medium avatar

on September 23, 2011
at 05:09 AM

You nailed it. The reference ranges for most blood work is "norm" rather than "optimal." It goes to the whole question of deficiency. The standard FDA stance on hormones is: it's "normal" for them to fade with age, get used to it. That's true, as far as it goes. Also true: age-related demise likewise correlates with hormone loss. There are choices (diet, exercise, supplements) that can boost our hormonal profiles as we age. One can also choose to replace hormones, via BHRT. This requires blood work and careful monitoring by an informed health practitioner, who may or may not have an MD license. Get informed; multiple paradigms and a variety of sources.

0
310003694bbcc5c6a0ba44dd95b8b521

on September 23, 2011
at 02:13 AM

Testosterone, Thyroid = t-3 t-4 levels, CRP, and homocysteine (among many) levels all have normal ranges with optimal levels for good health obliviously (to many anyway) different. Good luck trying to talk to your doctor about it; if you do some research you will probably know more than they do.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 23, 2011
at 02:23 PM

I was looking for some new 'optimal ranges' if possible

0
41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on September 23, 2011
at 02:02 AM

I know they changed the range on TSH to 0.3-3. Many labs still list the old range of .45-4.5

http://thyroid.about.com/cs/testsforthyroid/a/newrange.htm

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 23, 2011
at 05:22 AM

The narrower ranges are helpful for hypothyroid patients trying to get treated properly.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 23, 2011
at 02:07 AM

that's interesting. I just got a test back and my TSH was 0.303 and the lab norms are still listed at .45-4.5

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on September 23, 2011
at 02:17 AM

I do wonder if drug companies were pushing for the narrower ranges to sell more drugs though

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