0

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Have you ever heard of LEAP/MRT testing for food intolerance?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 19, 2011 at 4:42 PM

My mostly paleo-type diet has done great for my body comp, wellbeing and the likes. But I still suffer from some minor skin issues- small patches of eczema that appear on my legs from time to time, and occasionally severe itching around my body. Also, I have dark circles under my eyes, and occasional bruxism. These are all things that appear to be linked (possibly) to hidden food allergies.

I have been curious about food allergy testing for some time now, but have always read mixed info as to their efficacy. There is of course the ALCAT and ELISA that most people know about... but does anyone know about LEAP or MRT testing? To be honest, I am a bit unclear on the difference between them all.

Here is a site about LEAP testing and another one. I also found these on directlabs.com but I am not sure if this is the right thing.

I am sure many people are skeptical of some if not all of these tests, but any feedback would be much appreciated!

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on April 20, 2011
at 12:30 PM

Thats sals, not salsa!

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on April 20, 2011
at 12:28 PM

Look for failsafe or feingold or royal prince Albert hospital. From there you will find many food lists. Almost all spices are high in sals, BTW. You can try eliminating and testing them as a category, perhaps. The big problem with salsa is that you may be fine with 1 food per meal but not 3 or you may be fine on day 1 but not by day 4. Much harder to see the pattern. These diets are mainly used for children so don't let the food put you off. You just need the lists. You're very close to getting this sorted.

Cf5c9ba3c06cf300ae23c52778dfd317

(545)

on April 20, 2011
at 03:26 AM

For sure the elimination diet should ideally be the way to go, and I have tried them in the past. I also journal all my food intake via CRON-o-Meter, but I never really been able to discern any specific patterns. The fail-safe diet idea is good... I looked around a bit but couldn't find a specific food list for it. Is it just a typical hypoallergenic diet?

Cf5c9ba3c06cf300ae23c52778dfd317

(545)

on April 20, 2011
at 03:22 AM

Thanks for the response, but I am not sure what "non-paleo cheating" you are referring to, as I mentioned no such thing in my post. I eat zero grains, haven't touched vegetable oils in years, and make all my meals from scratch. Considering almost anything can provoke dermatitis-like reactions in susceptible people, I think my problem comes down to some obscure intolerance, perhaps to a particular spice or maybe a random vegetable. I do eat organic butter and sour cream, but I have definitely ruled these out... it seems the more butter I eat, the better my skin gets.

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14 Answers

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-1
0e4e5882872d6a7c472ea51aec457e66

(1994)

on April 19, 2011
at 06:29 PM

Have you tested yourself in a 100% Paleo diet for at least 4 weeks?

If your skin issues go away or deminish, the non-paleo-cheating is your problem - perhaps grains or dairy. Then stick to 100% Paleo.

If not, you can proceed to those fancy food allergie testings...

Cf5c9ba3c06cf300ae23c52778dfd317

(545)

on April 20, 2011
at 03:22 AM

Thanks for the response, but I am not sure what "non-paleo cheating" you are referring to, as I mentioned no such thing in my post. I eat zero grains, haven't touched vegetable oils in years, and make all my meals from scratch. Considering almost anything can provoke dermatitis-like reactions in susceptible people, I think my problem comes down to some obscure intolerance, perhaps to a particular spice or maybe a random vegetable. I do eat organic butter and sour cream, but I have definitely ruled these out... it seems the more butter I eat, the better my skin gets.

1
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on April 20, 2011
at 01:44 AM

In general, these tests are known to have many false positives and you still have to do an elimination diet to confirm the results. They are popular because they can give you a place to start, but you really don't have to shell out the money if you don't want to. A good food diary can help. Ractions can occur up to 72 hours after eating, especially skin. Sme people report reactions that build up over the course of a week.

Consider reading up on the fail-safe diet and salicylate sensitivity, particularly if you are eating lots more veg on this diet than you were. You can adjust the failsafe diet to be Paleo friendly, no problem.

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on April 20, 2011
at 12:30 PM

Thats sals, not salsa!

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on April 20, 2011
at 12:28 PM

Look for failsafe or feingold or royal prince Albert hospital. From there you will find many food lists. Almost all spices are high in sals, BTW. You can try eliminating and testing them as a category, perhaps. The big problem with salsa is that you may be fine with 1 food per meal but not 3 or you may be fine on day 1 but not by day 4. Much harder to see the pattern. These diets are mainly used for children so don't let the food put you off. You just need the lists. You're very close to getting this sorted.

Cf5c9ba3c06cf300ae23c52778dfd317

(545)

on April 20, 2011
at 03:26 AM

For sure the elimination diet should ideally be the way to go, and I have tried them in the past. I also journal all my food intake via CRON-o-Meter, but I never really been able to discern any specific patterns. The fail-safe diet idea is good... I looked around a bit but couldn't find a specific food list for it. Is it just a typical hypoallergenic diet?

0
56ba26e390c56af4b3e25104818fbe2a

on April 10, 2014
at 06:41 PM

LEAP/MRT and ALCAT are similar. Hard to say, but 'supposedly' MRT is superior. Unfortunately, this type of lab testing is considered 'experimental' and there is not a much research out there on the use of either. Most malfunctions happening in the body are rooted in the gut and I would agree that exploring food sensitivities is an ideal direction to take. I would also advise that it's probably not enough to just do MRT testing as here are probably multiple imbalances going on in the body. And I agree that a customized elimination diet is also essential.

I offer the MRT and other non traditional lab testing as well as functional nutrition services to my clients all over the United States.

0
56ba26e390c56af4b3e25104818fbe2a

on April 10, 2014
at 06:39 PM

LEAP/MRT and ALCAT are similar. Hard to say, but 'supposedly' MRT is superior. Unfortunately, this type of lab testing is considered 'experimental' and there is not a much research out there on the use of either. Most malfunctions happening in the body are rooted in the gut and I would agree that exploring food sensitivities is an ideal direction to take. I would also advise that it's probably not enough to just do MRT testing as here are probably multiple imbalances going on in the body.

I offer the MRT and other non traditional lab testing as well as functional nutrition services to my clients all over the United States.

0
9185278397bc628f7fd142c3b9ef3846

on October 08, 2013
at 12:25 PM

The MRT test has come a long way and provides the most useful info for food sensitivities. Anyone following paleo who still has symptoms could potentially be sensitive to one or more common paleo foods and this would be good info to know. Also if you have symptoms despite already removing your known triggers, migraine or IBS for example, you could find some missing pieces with MRT. By following the LEAP diet protocol that accompanies MRT testing (please work with someone trained in this), your lingering symptoms may improve, and over time you may even be able to reintroduce some or all of the foods and do just fine. For many people it can be a great tool for fine-tuning dietary changes already made. #LEAPdiet #MRTtest

0
C9dc6dfa73b4f4c362a64da2077684e4

on July 12, 2013
at 10:13 PM

I have severe psoriasis. It has gotten better and worse over the last 30 years according to where I live, my level of stress and what I eat. I have taken 2 ALCAT tests in the last 7 years because my food intolerances change. When I change my eating habits according to the test outcome my skin improves. It's time for another test as I can see changes again. I am considering the MRT instead of ALCAT. I understand that both tests were patented by the same doctor and the only difference is that the MRT is more sensitive. Does anyone have experience with the MRT for improving psoriasis specifically?

0
F98da529de03c5cd63e00314270e6208

on June 26, 2013
at 01:00 AM

is the mrt testing legit? i'm 18 and have had chronic nasal congestion almost always getting worse when i eat

it's hard to pinpoint the exact foods also, temperature, portion size, and other things may have an effect

should i get this done

i might as well not too expensive

0
754bc57b4098168652db7a627ac0c8fc

on May 17, 2013
at 03:45 PM

I realize this is an old post but I did MRT almost 11 years ago when it was released on the market. It changed my life. I was so sick I thought I was going to die before doctors figured it out. The issue with doing just an elimination diet is that if you start on a food that you are sensitive to, you may not know it until the next week and you're starting out sick already. LEAP will at least tell you which foods to start your elimination diet on. For me it was white potatoes. However, I'm searching for a doctor to repeat this on me now because I'm getting sick again. I feel it. But that makes sense to me. I've had 3 kids and I am 11 years older and I'm sure my body chemistry has changed a ton since I first did the test. As with anything, it's not the end all be all answer, but it gives you a very good starting point and reference guide. And I paid cash at the time since insurance didn't cover food sensitivity testing. Best $250 I ever spent. I stopped ending up in the ER from weird digestive issues (and trust me I HATE going to the ER) and I maybe go to the doctor one or twice a year outside of my regular prenatal appointments I've had. I've also not had to take allergy medication on a routine basis. I was on four different prescriptions for allergies before. My BP and cholesterol is also in great condition since I stopped eating the foods that were making me sick and my weight became completely manageable. That's been my sign most recently that I'm getting sick again... I'm bloated and can't drop the weight. So anyways, all that to say, I believe it really helped me figure a lot out about things that I would have assumed where healthy for me but turned out to be incompatible with my body chemistry. I've had RAST and ELISA also, they missed a ton compared to MRT (like my lecithin sensitivity for one which has been monumental! Yay no more sinus infections!!).

0
4f73b38f5fcae054cfe924528225d226

on April 06, 2013
at 06:01 PM

I support those who suggest further testing. After nearly a year on Paleo and a very restrictive elimination and reintroduction diet, I still couldn't clearly identify what was the culprit. I would feel better and then get worse - all with no grains. If you don't have obvious symptoms immediately, the elimination diet can be a challenge. Eventually I went to Cyrex Labs and found I had egg allergies. I'd reintroduced eggs after the trial elimination. There were also a few other items of interest in their Assays. My doctor was intrigued. I'm probably going to try the LEAP MRT program soon, as Cyrex isn't comprehensive for food allergens.

If you suffer from health problems that may be allergy related, I recommend doing all you can to prevent long term chronic health problems. Think about what you spend your money on. Isn't preserving your health worth the price of some testing? If you can afford it, go for it.

0
35a1b04d6ec52eda399afb47055c16c5

on February 21, 2013
at 01:04 AM

MRT Test and LEAP therapeutic program saved my life & took away 85% of my IBS & Fibromyalgia symptoms!!!!As a registered dietitian, I researched the traditional avenues of therapy for IBS & there was NO mention of anything for diet or nutrition. After researching everywhere I discovered the LEAP program & MRT Test. I immediately took the test & followed through on the therapy. This was all 8 years ago. I had such a remarkable turnaround in health, that I decided to study up on this & other functional nutrition. I got certified and have devoted my entire private practice in nutrition to working with all inflammatory & Auto-Immune disorders that MRT Testing & LEAP Therapy can help: IBS, Fibromyalgia, GERD, Asthma, Autism, ADD, Arthritis, Migraine headache, Chronic Diarrhea & Constipation, Inability to loose weight, Skin eruptions, Celiac, all sorts of gut issues, dysbiosis, AND SOOOO MUCH MORE. After 100's of happy past clients, All I can say is "it works". Donna Wolf RD CLT -Healthy Directions of Poway, California

0
5531c60f736fc5ceb6fd737d602c81dd

on February 13, 2013
at 02:06 PM

After my 17 year old daughter cried in her pediatrician's office that she worried that she could never feel well enough to live on her own, she was sent for an MRT. Prior to that she had had intensive GI workups... you name it, I think they've tried it. Finally we were told that all her IBS, reflux, and misc abdominal pain, rashes, etc. must be tied to her Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (a genetic disorder that often includes stomach issues). She took tons of medications every day to mask the symptoms and some to treat the anxiety of chronic pain. The MRT provided answers we'd have never found with elimination diets alone. As mentioned in one response, there were obscure sensitivities to a handful of things. She is now symptom free, off all meds, and happier than ever. For once she's excited to go off to college! Not sure about any other testing, but this test turned our world around.

0
95b30ce90dbfe97705e90a2a550984c8

on January 03, 2013
at 02:29 PM

I am currently on the LEAP program and it is great. It is difficult but worth it. I am off all medications for IBS and my allergies. My energy is consistent and my mood swings are non-existent.

0
F3a61fed8e14ce5b56e7ff431dedf800

on July 29, 2012
at 04:53 AM

Has anyone tried the MRT? I have been on GAPS for 5 months on a super restrictive diet and still having symptoms. Though symptoms are less, i still don't tolerate far too many foods to sustain this diet, so i was intrigued by the MRT. Would love to hear from people who have taken the test and can report on their experience. THanks!

0
Cf0f81de3b1103acbdd48c51341fcaa9

on May 11, 2012
at 04:13 PM

Sounds like you may have issues with gut dysfunction as food allergies can be a symptom of that. Plus, with inflammation in the gut the villi and brush border break down leading to lack of enzymes to digest food. Since the liver is the major detox organ, it may not be working functionally(like a dirty vacuum bag) and this causing skin problems. MRT is a great way to avoid those foods to help eliminate inflammation. There is a protocol for healing.

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