2

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Carb feeding before donating blood?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 16, 2011 at 3:51 AM

Does this make sense?

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 21, 2011
at 04:53 PM

thanks!!!!!!!!!

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 21, 2011
at 04:53 PM

It's not SAD for a day. It usually knocks me out of whack for a week. That canteen is really dangerous to some.

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 16, 2011
at 06:13 PM

Meredith, that is what I did this time. I had a large serving of Jerusalem artichokes for lunch, and I also had some fruit for breakfast. Usually I eat more carbs afterwards.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on December 16, 2011
at 02:48 PM

I don't have a clue if it would be necessary for you to carb load, but it seems to me that if you've experienced hypoglycemia from donating blood, the best thing to eat for that would be glucose, and that's not sugar, its starch. Sucrose is half glucose half fructose. Starch would give you more glucose, so why not have some potato before and after and see how you do?

Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on December 16, 2011
at 05:45 AM

Necessary? For what? If the aim is to maintain stable blood glucose, then making sure you're in the black beforehand is going to be more effective than trying to make it up afterwards.

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 16, 2011
at 05:43 AM

but, I did eat sugar afterwards on other occasions. The question is, is it necessary to carb-load before the process?

Medium avatar

(12379)

on December 16, 2011
at 05:23 AM

Great answer Meredith! You're one of the best dummies I know ;)

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5 Answers

7
Medium avatar

(12379)

on December 16, 2011
at 05:28 AM

Donating blood is so important so whatever let's you donate and feel good while doing so is good on my books, but who the hell am I? Really it's only a day out of every eight weeks and you're saving three lives i say do it. Also thank you!

7
0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on December 16, 2011
at 04:26 AM

Actually phlebotomy is excellent at increasing insulin sensitivity by depleting iron stores - at least this is what I've read. Some are exploring it's use as a therapy for Type II Diabetes.

Here's but one example. There are more papers,etc. about phlebotomy, iron depletion and improved insulin resistance.

Because giving blood has the instant effect of increasing glucose uptake, then it seems reasonable that you may experience some low blood sugar after if you avoid replenishing the glucose. This is just speculation, but gluconeogenesis is not a quick process, so your liver may not be able to provide the immediate sugar you may need after donating blood, therefore you'd need to eat it.

Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on December 16, 2011
at 05:45 AM

Necessary? For what? If the aim is to maintain stable blood glucose, then making sure you're in the black beforehand is going to be more effective than trying to make it up afterwards.

Medium avatar

(12379)

on December 16, 2011
at 05:23 AM

Great answer Meredith! You're one of the best dummies I know ;)

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on December 16, 2011
at 02:48 PM

I don't have a clue if it would be necessary for you to carb load, but it seems to me that if you've experienced hypoglycemia from donating blood, the best thing to eat for that would be glucose, and that's not sugar, its starch. Sucrose is half glucose half fructose. Starch would give you more glucose, so why not have some potato before and after and see how you do?

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 16, 2011
at 05:43 AM

but, I did eat sugar afterwards on other occasions. The question is, is it necessary to carb-load before the process?

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 16, 2011
at 06:13 PM

Meredith, that is what I did this time. I had a large serving of Jerusalem artichokes for lunch, and I also had some fruit for breakfast. Usually I eat more carbs afterwards.

3
Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on December 16, 2011
at 04:03 AM

It makes sense, and there's no reason why SAD for a day is going to ruin your whole life, though it probably includes some sub-optimal elements. I'd like to think that the natural response to trauma that resulted in the loss of blood would be to rest while you recovered. If eating carbs to pre-empt that and be able to counter a drop in energy is the compromise you choose then great. I'd consider it similar to using caffeine to compensate for insufficient sleep, but it's not as if we want to live long and healthy lives simply for the sake of it. We want to be doing things while we're alive too.

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 21, 2011
at 04:53 PM

It's not SAD for a day. It usually knocks me out of whack for a week. That canteen is really dangerous to some.

2
B9637ddb9a9a5c6a7306e3c804fcd21d

(3217)

on December 16, 2011
at 05:14 PM

I'm also a regular blood donor, and upping carbs on donation day really help, since they compensate for the temporary hypoglycemia you get after donating.

I drink coconut water after donating (has lots of potassium for hydration which you really need after a donation, and it also has natural, simply available sugars), and a piece of sweet fruit I'd usually avoid, e.g. papaya, mango, or (this one's my favourite) a persimmon. And for dinner on donation day I'll have a side of starchy vegetables instead of my customary broccoli (roasted butternut squash & carrots).

True, nothing is going to really happen to you if you eat SAD for a day. However, is it not best to get your carbs from primal sources? Check this out http://www.marksdailyapple.com/what-happens-to-your-body-when-you-carb-binge/#axzz1giYfEHgs - of course, the context here is a lot different, since donating blood has the effect of depleting glucose, so you wouldn't get the described sugar-crash, but note that refined sugar and flour have adverse effects even if you eat them once. I personally wouldn't touch a biscuit anyhow since any wheat gives me immobilizing stomach aches.

Carbs do prevent lightheadedness and even fainting sometimes experienced by blood donors; by all means up your carbs on donation day, but I really think its best to get them from primal sources. Pack your own snack rather than going to the canteen. You could easily get 'simple fast carbs' through coconut water, or fresh-squeezed fruit juice. You don't need the cookies.

That is the difference between paleo, and something like Atkins. Paleo doesn't have LC as a primary goal; rather, LC comes naturally if you eat paleo. You can adjust carbs to your comfort level, taking into account factors such as activity, general carb tolerance, if its a donation day...the focus remains eating healthy, unprocessed, real food.

Lots of Paleo love,

Milla

fellow donor! :-)

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 21, 2011
at 04:53 PM

thanks!!!!!!!!!

0
B53f530d64ad9e1b128a0358a85ba268

on May 10, 2012
at 10:46 AM

I donate pretty regularly and have done it under a variety of conditions. Fasted state, well fed, SAD fed, etc. SAD fed is the only state that creates negative effects for me, but SAD fed makes me feel pretty bad no matter what. I've never taken one of their snacks or drinks afterwards no matter what my condition was upon entering.

You don't say why you're asking, but if you're just trying to feel better you should experiment. If you're curious about the biochemistry involved, I am too!

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