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Athletic heart syndrome

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 11, 2011 at 7:11 PM

I have a check up coming, so this is not a hunt for a medical answer / solution. But want to have a little more info as I go in. My blood screening came back with optimal numbers across the board after 5 months paleo, one thing that did change and I have been monitoring is my blood pressure. Always had good numbers, but I am averaging a 140/65 these days. I work in a place where I can check it randomly the proper way, so I have been checking. I have read up some about athletic heart syndrome in athletes that push the training limits, and I have been CrossFitting for a while now with amazing results. I am training at the "Big Dog" level with competitive numbers of what I see posted in the comments. Generally 3/4 of what I see the pro's of CrossFit racking up. What I am curious about is if anyone else has these types of changes on their BP? Has my heart possibly grown larger with my new intense work outs? Like I said, I go for my 36 year old check up this month, so I am sure the Dr will be looking me over for what ever I request extra so this is just a curiosity thing.

7792d8e2ada34662a3226a7d1952940a

(900)

on April 12, 2011
at 02:20 AM

Not that far in yet, but that would make sense with what I have researched.

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4 Answers

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1
0ee98c251b5eef357445aefec99c5d7b

(888)

on April 11, 2011
at 08:33 PM

See The Paleo Solution page 153. What medicine sees as a 'normal' heart is the heart of a sedentary person. As you've grown stronger your heart has become stronger (and bigger) as well. This adaptation is called an 'athletic' heart and it is the normal human heart (for a non-sedentary person, like a paleolithic HG).

7792d8e2ada34662a3226a7d1952940a

(900)

on April 12, 2011
at 02:20 AM

Not that far in yet, but that would make sense with what I have researched.

0
425aa4bfb79556ed50ea693c3edd7e13

(609)

on April 11, 2011
at 08:35 PM

Cortisol causes hypertension. Exercise for the reader: does Crossfit done chronically cause high cortisol levels?

0
7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

on April 11, 2011
at 08:23 PM

Blood pressure goes up due to increased pressure, your blood is not flowing to your heart as quickly as it should. I have not heard of it being due to an increase in the SIZE of your heart, but I am not a medical person.

The main thing that reduced my blood pressure was lowering my carbs and sodium, which reduced my edema (water retention) which in turn, reduced my blood pressure.

Could you be consuming something that is causing you to retain more water?

0
5edbf85deaf83e13b176df023abb154d

on April 11, 2011
at 07:47 PM

I used to be a professional athlete, my heart has always been identified after X-Rays as being large (enlarged?) and I never have a BP problem. I'm in my mid-40s.

Perhaps you're overly stressing your body with your intense workouts? I don't know.

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