0

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Started getting high blood glucose :/

Commented on January 29, 2014
Created January 28, 2014 at 3:18 PM

Hi,

recently i've been getting higher glucose levels than usual. My fasting glucose in the morning has been around 5.2-5.8 mmol/l (93.6 mg/dl - 104.4 mg/dl), and it still is. But my glucose levels between meals is getting to about 7.8 mmol/l (140.4 mg/dl) even 4 hours after the meal. Directly after a meal it can go all the way up to 12 mmol/l(216 mg/d)!!! I have never had any issues with blood glucose before.

I eat 2-3 meals a day and i almost never snack. I follow a Perfect Health Diet with potatoes and some parboiled rice.

I have been eating 4 tbsp resistant starch in form of raw potato starch for about a month. The potato starch does not raise my blood glucose at all.

Should i be worried? What could be the cause?

*UPDATE: I checked my blood glucose about 30 minutes after dinner and it was down to 5.9! For dinner i had brown beans and sausage. How could it be lower after the meal than before(it was 7.8)?

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on January 29, 2014
at 08:27 PM

When did I imply that? I said the exact opposite, re-read my comment. Olive oil increases HDL.

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on January 29, 2014
at 08:07 PM

So olive oil will lower HDL cholesterol? And that is good because...?

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on January 29, 2014
at 08:01 PM

You might also want to take a look at this study which depicts the changes in insulin sensitivity with respect to dietary fats consumption. It compares saturated fat, monounsaturated fat, and (evil) trans-saturated fat: http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/25/8/1283.full.pdf If you go down to Table 2 you will see the results, insulin sensitivity is Si and glucose effectiveness is Sg. Monounsaturated fat is M, saturated is S and trans is T. As you could see, monounsaturated fat is hugely beneficial to improving insulin sensitivity and blood lipids.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on January 29, 2014
at 07:35 PM

This is one of the best studies I have seen to date comparing the effects of different fats on serum lipid levels: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/77/5/1146.full.pdf it is really worth a read due to it's very comprehensive nature, the chart at the top right of page 6 is quite telling. This study compares the effects of various fatty acids on cholesterol levels as well: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/61/5/1129.full.pdf. Notice that olive oil (monounsaturated oleic acid) provides the optimal combination of resistace to oxidation, promotion of HDL, and reduction of LDL.

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on January 29, 2014
at 07:27 PM

I live in Sweden though ;)

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on January 29, 2014
at 07:12 PM

This article goes over the fake olive oil controversy pretty well http://lifehacker.com/the-most-and-least-fake-extra-virgin-olive-oil-brands-1460894373. If you are truly concerned, just buy extra virgin olive oils from California like I do if you want to keep you mind at ease (from personal experience California Olive Ranch's extra virgin olive oil is really, really good). The problem is only with the imports, not the domestics (if you live in the US).

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on January 29, 2014
at 06:29 PM

Avocado oil is expensive and i don't trust that the olive oil i can find is truly olive oil. It is probably mixed with cheap polyunsaturated seed oil

Cce653018976b0b26924c59aa94e5579

(15)

on January 29, 2014
at 04:57 PM

@TheGastronomer I've been interested in saturated fats vs. monounsaturated fats recently (though I've often preferred saturated fats for awhile solely based on taste/cost effectiveness).

Would you mind sharing some of your directions of research?

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on January 28, 2014
at 08:01 PM

Why are you exclusively eating saturated fats? What objections do you have to monounsaturated fats? They are also resistant to oxidation (within reasonable temperature limits), and don't promote physiological insulin resistance quite as much as saturated fats. I can point you in the direction of some research if you're interested.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on January 28, 2014
at 07:55 PM

The fall after the meal makes sense. The pancreas responds to a large supply of glucose by releasing insulin which shuttles the glucose into the cells thereby lowering blood glucose, this is the expected behavior. Your problem is with fasting blood glucose levels not postprandial. Your fasting is elevated because, after the insulin levels come down, glucagon tells the liver to break down stored glycogen in hepatocytes and release it for energy, into the blood stream. Elevated blood glucose is a sign that your pumping a lot more glycogen into your liver than it can store.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on January 28, 2014
at 06:26 PM

After 4 hours it starts to become noticeable, sometimes it would go up into the 120s mg/dl, which is a lot higher than my usual 80mg/dl. This effect was even more noticeable in the mornings, since I usually eat and go to sleep afterwards. I suppose that once the insulin spike from the meal subsides, glucagon rises to tell the liver to break down and dump the excess glycogen in storage, and it causes quite a large rise in BS. After going low-carb, this has not happened, unless I consume a gigantic amount of protein. Which makes sense considering that's what gluconeogenesis is there for.

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on January 28, 2014
at 06:00 PM

How much later and how high did it go?

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on January 28, 2014
at 05:18 PM

I don't put much stock in epidimiological observations. While I do believe that valid hypotheses may be derived from such observations, they speak little of the actual underlying mechanisms which guide the physiological processes in question. I value clinical trials, and controlled experiments over anecdotal evidence and epidimiology, and I hope others do as well. Ultimately the health of certain populations is a summation of the different behaviors of that population and not just one isolated component, like diet. Controlled experiments trump any other data.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on January 28, 2014
at 05:08 PM

Well I got a glucometer for my father, since he had been having issues with his blood glucose. I proceeded to measure my own out of sheer curiosity and that's when I found some surprises which I wasn't expecting. I noticed that during meals when I consumed a lot of carbs my BS would not go up immediately, but later on they would begin to creep upwards into dangerous territory. It's almost as if the body puts it away the minute you eat it, but begins to dump it back into the blood stream later on. This observation was consistent with the effects of insulin/glucagon and the fed/fasted state

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on January 28, 2014
at 04:58 PM

I experiment a lot with different foods. I seem to be getting along fine with legumes IF i prepare them correctly(soak for at least 24 hours, etc). They are very satiating. You could say that i follow a PHD/WAPF-diet ;)

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on January 28, 2014
at 04:55 PM

I haven't had this problem on the PHD for 2 years. Maybe it could be cortisol-related...

Cce653018976b0b26924c59aa94e5579

(15)

on January 28, 2014
at 04:54 PM

That's an interesting update. I've no idea about the blood glucose being lower after than before. Perhaps it's a complex topic. (The only thing I can think of, with my limited knowledge of blood glucose, is to check that your testing equipment is working properly and giving correct data.)

I am curious, though. I thought the Perfect Health Diet eliminated legumes; do you incorporate them into your diet for a particular reason?

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on January 28, 2014
at 04:53 PM

I usually include fats in my diet from butter, cream, coconut milk, coconut oil, etc. But as the Jaminets say in the PHD-book, if you want to cut calories you can lower the fat content a bit.

Did you see that i updated my post? I checked my bg 30 minutes after eating beans and sausage and it was down to 5.9 again(it was 7.8 before). Maybe it could be cortisol related? I usually skip breakfast.

Cce653018976b0b26924c59aa94e5579

(15)

on January 28, 2014
at 04:50 PM

Thank you for posting your data and asking this question, by the way. It's interesting to have an n=1 about blood glucose and the PHD. I'm curious to see what other answers you get. :)

Cce653018976b0b26924c59aa94e5579

(15)

on January 28, 2014
at 04:48 PM

(Sorry, that was originally directed @TheGastronomer. :) )

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on January 28, 2014
at 04:46 PM

I did not notice anything different with my body/mood/etc. I just check my blood glucose from time to time because i think it is interesting. I've only had positive changes since starting to eat more "safe starches". My sleep has been better and i had stalled on a low-carb-paleo-diet and lost about 10 more pounds when i introduced potatoes and rice!

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on January 28, 2014
at 04:40 PM

Actually, from what i've understood, parboiled rice has a glycemic index of 38. Btw, i just checked my blood glucose again, about 30 minutes after dinner and it was down to 5.9! Before dinner it was 7.8.

Cce653018976b0b26924c59aa94e5579

(15)

on January 28, 2014
at 04:38 PM

I'm also curious about what your thoughts, if any, are regarding the tropical peoples of Kitava, or tropical populations who ate/eat starchy tubers and corms in general. Genetic adaptation?

Cce653018976b0b26924c59aa94e5579

(15)

on January 28, 2014
at 04:36 PM

That's very interesting. How did you eventually notice the effect on your blood glucose? Was there a difference in feeling? How many carbs do you typically consume now?

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3 Answers

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(154)

on January 29, 2014
at 07:50 PM

Curious if anyone has implemented the ketogenic protocol as specified in the PHD book? It recommends at least 200 calories starchy veggies (50g starchy carbs?), 600 combined protein and carb calories (so at least 100g protein?), and a minimum of 4 Tbsp of MCT oil per day, as well as a few supplements (and of course, other fats and non-starchy vegges ad libitum).

This protocol seems to be in response to the horrible ways doctors have implemented various versions of ketogenic diets in the past which caused complications in their patients.

0
Cce653018976b0b26924c59aa94e5579

(15)

on January 28, 2014
at 04:46 PM

That's interesting. Are you possibly consuming too many potatoes and white rice? Also, are you incorporating them into a meal? As far as I know, combining an acid and fat (e.g. potatoes mashed with coconut oil and vinegar), and perhaps other ingredients in with carbohydrates like white rice or potatoes drastically lowers the glycemic index (and thus lowers/blunts blood sugar spikes) and increases absorbability of nutrients.

If you're consistently consuming white rice or potatoes in isolation, and not with meats, vegetables, fats, or acids, that could be a potential problem. Consuming foods together as an array is very important for absorbability. Consistently consuming types of foods in isolation can cause many problems.

You might also consider mixing tbsps of the raw potato starch into your rice/potatoes, if you're taking it in isolation, as it will also likely lower the GI, as well as being healthful to your colonic gut flora.

Also, have you checked that you are, indeed, consuming 50-70%+ of your calories from fat, and 15-30% from protein (which leaves 10-35% for carbs, but not more than.)?

Apart from that and simply consuming too many carbohydrates, I'm not sure. Did you have any signs of metabolic dysregulation before? Do you have any metabolic dysregulation already, such as diabetes? If so, potentially a much lower-carb version of the PHD, or a ketogenic version would be worth looking into.

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on January 28, 2014
at 04:53 PM

I usually include fats in my diet from butter, cream, coconut milk, coconut oil, etc. But as the Jaminets say in the PHD-book, if you want to cut calories you can lower the fat content a bit.

Did you see that i updated my post? I checked my bg 30 minutes after eating beans and sausage and it was down to 5.9 again(it was 7.8 before). Maybe it could be cortisol related? I usually skip breakfast.

0
Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on January 28, 2014
at 04:30 PM

Its the rice. I hate to break it to you but the "Perfect Health Diet" only works if you have been blessed with a superb metabolism and a huge tolerance to the metabolic damage carbs can cause. Starchy foods like rice and potatoes elevate blood glucose levels very high. Just look at their glycemic index (http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsweek/Glycemic_index_and_glycemic_load_for_100_foods.htm). White rice 89, Baked russet potato 111, Boiled white potato 82. Keep in mind that a cup with pure glucose syrup is 100. So white rice and boiled potatoes are almost as bad as a cup of pure glucose, while a baked potato is even worse that pure glucose.

I understand many people don't wan't to let go of the carbs because they are delicious, I understand this dilemma. I am Cuban born so during most of my life, rice and beans were part of nearly every meal. I eventually noticed the effect this had on my blood glucose and immediately noticed the difference when I dropped the rice. I proceeded to drop many of the other carbs and noticed the difference was even more profound. If you truly like carbs go ahead and eat them, just remember, it is a very dangerous road to walk down, and living with diabetes is a horrible way to live. You will have no one to answer to but yourself, and no "diet guru" is going to give you a shoulder to cry on once you get in trouble for following their advice.

Good luck.

Cce653018976b0b26924c59aa94e5579

(15)

on January 28, 2014
at 04:38 PM

I'm also curious about what your thoughts, if any, are regarding the tropical peoples of Kitava, or tropical populations who ate/eat starchy tubers and corms in general. Genetic adaptation?

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on January 28, 2014
at 04:40 PM

Actually, from what i've understood, parboiled rice has a glycemic index of 38. Btw, i just checked my blood glucose again, about 30 minutes after dinner and it was down to 5.9! Before dinner it was 7.8.

Cce653018976b0b26924c59aa94e5579

(15)

on January 28, 2014
at 04:36 PM

That's very interesting. How did you eventually notice the effect on your blood glucose? Was there a difference in feeling? How many carbs do you typically consume now?

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