3

votes

Please help a biochem student out with gluconeogenesis...?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 11, 2011 at 1:31 AM

Hi,

I have a mid-term tomorrow in biochem and my TA has confused me horribly. He gave us a worksheet with the question:

"Our bodies can create highly branched polysaccharides of glucose through a process of GLYCONEOGENESIS. What is the name of this polymer?"

The answer he gave: GLYCOGEN.

Now, I'm a big gluconeogenesis fan (being Paleo for a year and all) and I also study hard, so I know (because my textbook says so) that the result of GLUCOneogenesis is GLUCOSE. And I also know that the end result of GLYCOGENESIS (no "neo") is Glycogen.

The TA insisted that the words 'glyconeogenesis' and 'gluconeogenesis' are the same thing and that the answer is glycogen.

I can't get a hold of my prof for clarification and my classmates are memorizing 'glyconeogenesis' to mean the same thing as glycogenesis.

I figure if anyone would know, it would be hard-core paleos!!! Thanks!!!

Cc69a51b427eaad36251cce9dcca4d3a

(1074)

on December 27, 2011
at 02:56 AM

not to be confused with glycogenolysis which is breakdown of glycogen to form free glucose

Cc69a51b427eaad36251cce9dcca4d3a

(1074)

on December 27, 2011
at 02:56 AM

not sure but the end result of gluconeogenesis would be glyconeogenesis or formation of glycogen

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 26, 2011
at 06:47 PM

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/dmrr.217/full "Glycogen synthesis from gluconeogenic substrates was termed ‘glyconeogenesis"

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 23, 2011
at 04:57 PM

I disagree, glyconeogenesis is a term for when glycogen is refilled in the liver due to glyconeogenesis, and not dietary carbs

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on November 11, 2011
at 06:03 AM

it's two pyruvate...

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on November 11, 2011
at 05:58 AM

Gluconeogenesis is the conversion of amino acids, lactate or glycerol into glucose. Glycogenesis is the conversion of glucose into glycogen. glycogenolysis is the conversion of glycogen into glucose. Glycolysis is the conversion of glucose into 2 ATP, pyruvate and a couple NADH (maybe a CO2 thrown in for good merit).

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on November 11, 2011
at 05:57 AM

Gluconeogenesis is the conversion of amino acids, lactate or glycerol into glucose. Glycogenesis is the conversion of glucose into glycogen. Glycolysis is the conversion of glycogen into glucose.

D1c02d4fc5125a670cf419dbb3e18ba7

on November 11, 2011
at 02:43 AM

+1 - A picture is definitely worth a 1000 words

88817c69d6684c8342b243220f1aa8a6

(88)

on November 11, 2011
at 01:40 AM

Thanks, I thought the TA was wrong too. And my textbook says he's wrong. I guess if it talks about 'highly branched' or 'poly' then I'll just go glycogen. But I'll know the answer is wrong...

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7 Answers

8
24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on November 11, 2011
at 02:27 AM

Maybe he was looking at this image at the time and contracted the two? Or perhaps glycoNEOgenesis is glycogen formed from glucose formed from gluconeogenesis?

please-help-a-biochem-student-out-with-gluconeogenesis...?

Definitely since he's talking about the synthesis of a polysaccharide, and asks for the name of a polymer, it's ... glycogen. Go with Travis here! Glucose would not be the correct answer either to the question as posed, even if the question contains errors.

D1c02d4fc5125a670cf419dbb3e18ba7

on November 11, 2011
at 02:43 AM

+1 - A picture is definitely worth a 1000 words

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 26, 2011
at 06:47 PM

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/dmrr.217/full "Glycogen synthesis from gluconeogenic substrates was termed ‘glyconeogenesis"

5
Medium avatar

on November 11, 2011
at 01:34 AM

I'm no biochemist, but the TA is wrong. It's gluconeogenesis for glucose from lactate, glucogenic amino acids etc. and glycogenesis for the creation of glycogen in liver and muscle.

I guess you'd know from the question that the polysaccharide is glycogen though.

88817c69d6684c8342b243220f1aa8a6

(88)

on November 11, 2011
at 01:40 AM

Thanks, I thought the TA was wrong too. And my textbook says he's wrong. I guess if it talks about 'highly branched' or 'poly' then I'll just go glycogen. But I'll know the answer is wrong...

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 23, 2011
at 04:57 PM

I disagree, glyconeogenesis is a term for when glycogen is refilled in the liver due to glyconeogenesis, and not dietary carbs

3
3b0b95dfc6dc5c18e535945f4aab0866

on November 11, 2011
at 01:54 AM

Your TA is confused. Glyconeogenesis is actually another term for gluconeogenesis (so it is a valid term) but as you realized, it IS NOT the same thing as glycogenolysis.

2
D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on November 11, 2011
at 05:50 AM

Uhm, everyone here is a bit mistaken or at least incomplete. Both your TA and the rest of the crew. Your TA is mistaken because he's talking about Glycogenesis -- the synthesis of branched glycogen from glucose molecules --- not glyconeogenesis. Gluconeogenesis (or Glyconeogenesis) does indeed exist but it isn't about making branched polymers. It's about making a single glucose molecule. When these single glucose molecules are combined for storage (usually during a fed state, not typically from a cell doing gluconeogenesis) together, that structure is called glycogen and the process of making them is called glycogenesis. On the other hand, if we were to break down glycogen back to glucose, that process would be called glycogenolysis. I know these things because I'm Not a Doctor.

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on November 11, 2011
at 06:03 AM

it's two pyruvate...

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on November 11, 2011
at 05:57 AM

Gluconeogenesis is the conversion of amino acids, lactate or glycerol into glucose. Glycogenesis is the conversion of glucose into glycogen. Glycolysis is the conversion of glycogen into glucose.

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on November 11, 2011
at 05:58 AM

Gluconeogenesis is the conversion of amino acids, lactate or glycerol into glucose. Glycogenesis is the conversion of glucose into glycogen. glycogenolysis is the conversion of glycogen into glucose. Glycolysis is the conversion of glucose into 2 ATP, pyruvate and a couple NADH (maybe a CO2 thrown in for good merit).

1
Medium avatar

on November 11, 2011
at 04:59 AM

Your TA is mistaken, for reasons mentioned above.

The key thing is: your very question indicates you've got the makings of an independent thinker.

Makings? Sh%t. You already THERE, bro.

1
0a2dd50f2d3951bf3fb83fc4638c9512

(1960)

on November 11, 2011
at 04:00 AM

Love the communal knowledge of the PH community.

0
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 23, 2011
at 05:00 PM

Glyconeogenesis is indeed a real process, it is when glycogen in the liver is refilled via gluconeogenesis. A large portion of liver glycogen is refilled this way, not via carbohydrate consumption as many people would assume. I have a few papers that show this but on a different computer.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/dmrr.217/full

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