2

votes

Compulsive overeating, 22 year old male. Advice Needed.

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created September 12, 2012 at 4:21 AM

22 Year old male. Compulsive overeater. Have been down the psychologist path in the past only to be told I need to include some food that is a reward once a week, that item being a good quality ice cream. Sounds alot like a cheat meal to me and guess what led me to where I am today, good old cheat meals. I am quite sure that sugar and to some extent gluten grains are the major players in the addictiveness of these foods and the relapsing of binge eating tendencies. So I am looking for advice. I am of a pretty high level of fitness, sub 50minute 10km, near double bodyweight backsquat etc but hold alot more weight than someone of my training level should. Is a whole30 with the goal to try and kick the sugar cravings/addicition worth a crack? Say a whole30 incorporating a big protein breaky kruse style and then eating my other two meals in the window after my two workouts? I've run out of ideas and just want to be able to live a normal life again where I don't have to deal with feeling like shit, bloated, depressive etc for a few days every few weeks due to a binge.

Thanks in advance.

Dc6407193ba441d1438f6f0c06af872b

(4400)

on September 15, 2012
at 12:30 AM

I definitely binged, though not like many of the commenters here. Still, for me it was really useful to record all I ate, for one reason: it's fun to binge, but it's no fun to have to record it. The humiliation, but mostly just the hassle, made it not worth it. Better to just wait until dinner to eat!

Dc6407193ba441d1438f6f0c06af872b

(4400)

on September 15, 2012
at 12:27 AM

Yes, it's a pain in the butt to record everything you eat. So if you commit to doing this, you may decide you'd rather wait an hour for dinner than eat and have to record it. Not to mention it's a bummer to record eating a huge amount of junk. It helped me, anyway.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 13, 2012
at 10:24 AM

Things like MSG, fructose, caffeine, wheat, some of the artificial flavors and additives in junk food are very addictive - so if you're hooked on them, you can't trust your senses, also if you're on SAD, you're going to be a carboholic. Once you get away from the additives and high carbs for long enough, you can begin to heal, and your senses will function properly, at which point, cravings become trustworthy and indicate stuff you're actually missing from your diet.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 13, 2012
at 10:19 AM

Yup, modern engineered foods (don't just mean GMOs) are designed to fool our senses. Take them out and a while later, our senses work again. i.e. soda is designed to temporarily quench our thirst, but really the fructose, salt (yes, there's salt in some!), actually cause us to be more thirsty, so we tend to crave a second one soon after. Things like flavored chips are designed to be crunchy, but when you chew them they turn into non-filling mush - their aroma and high salt (but only from sodium, lacking other minerals) drives us to want to eat more though it's a nutritionally devoid food.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 13, 2012
at 03:25 AM

@ Maria - nuts don't count, we binge on them for a different reason. As for cucumbers and lettuce - they are not junk food, but compared to other foods, they are NOT nutritionally dense. Terry Wahls never mentions lettuce and cucumbers. Also, you say you eat an excellent diet full of macronutrients - do you eat liver and kale on a daily basis? Have you tried Terry Wahls diet? Why pasta and potatoes did not give you cravings - for the same reason they don't give cravings to millions of people. Has your gut flora got altered somehow by antibiotics?

Fd7b128cf714044a86d8bd822c7a8992

(4292)

on September 13, 2012
at 01:11 AM

It's a really interesting idea and I think it has some truth, but: I can binge on lettuce. I can binge on cucumbers. Never done liver, but I can binge on chicken. If I have nuts in the house at all it's like a foregone conclusion that I'll end up binging on them. None of those things are junk food. And I eat an excellent diet full of micronutrients. Furthermore, when my diet was much, much worse (think: pasta and potatoes every day), I had 0 binging issues because my current mental health problems weren't there. If binging were due to deficiency, shouldn't it have lessened with a better diet?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 12, 2012
at 06:41 PM

Amy, the question is why so many people who feel lonely/depressed/whatever ARE NOT CRAVING anything, but some people do crave stuff? Have you tried overeating raw broccoli with liver and some grass-fed butter? Try it as an experiment!

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 12, 2012
at 06:38 PM

+1 for great advice. And this: "One bite was too many, 1,000 is not enough."

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 12, 2012
at 06:36 PM

Glad you mentioned the chemically manipulated foods, b/c I don't think anyone's body is subconsciously trying to obtain micronutrients when they're shoveling in Doritos or Little Debbie cakes. When you're *already* on a clean diet, then yes, your body might give you proper signals (craving something salty, sweet, of fatty) but when you're still addicted to what the Hartwigs (from Whole9) call "food with no brakes," then you can't *trust* the signals your body sends. Our modern processed foods are *manufactured* with the purpose of inducing unnatural cravings for more, more, more.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 12, 2012
at 06:32 PM

I can overeat on broccoli! (Cooked, not raw.) I love Sally Fallon, and I wholeheartedly agree that *some* cravings come from nutrient deficiencies/imbalances. But I also believe there can be emotional triggers. Now, it's possible those out-of-whack emotions are, themselves, the result of nutritional imbalances, but not always. My extreme loneliness has nothing to do with how much magnesium or vitamin A I'm taking in. I might feel less *sad* about my loneliness with better nutrition, but lack of vits & mins ain't the *cause.*

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 12, 2012
at 04:05 PM

Just watch Terry Wahls and Sally Fallon - they both explain cravings, especially sugar and fat cravings. They both explain nutritional deficiencies. As for dairy - it is NOT nutritionally dense. Compare dairy to kale or salmon. You can get the same vitamins as dairy from other nutritionally dense foods.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 12, 2012
at 04:02 PM

If you watch Terry Wahls video, she explains why people overeat (they are deprived of nutrients). Most sweets/fats are calorie dense foods, that's why we crave them. Sally Fallon also explains why we crave foods. There is no such thing as emotional overeating - when we are stressed, our vitamin A gets depleted (source - Sally Fallon's video) and we start craving things.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on September 12, 2012
at 03:53 PM

Are you taking Magnesium? It has made a huge difference for me re: sugar cravings.

Medium avatar

(2338)

on September 12, 2012
at 02:24 PM

the only time i've ever binged was when i as high.

76211ec5301087de2588cfe3d6bccba9

(1178)

on September 12, 2012
at 02:21 PM

it is completely possible to overeat vegetables when you are in binge-mode. it has more to do with a reward response/addiction i believe.

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on September 12, 2012
at 01:59 PM

To me, the fact that a person wouldn't overeat broccoli or liver don't prove that cravings are the sign of a nutritional deficiency. By that logic, most people with cravings must be deficient in carbs/sugar/salt since that's generally what we crave. Which of course cannot be true - I don't think the average overeating American is deficient in sugar! I think cravings may be triggered by overall deficiency - not eating enough period - and I think it's interesting as to whether a specific deficiency causes a specific craving ,but I disagree that you've "proven" it by points 1 and 2 above.

A1a0baccef58499acf9ceb3c874997f2

(675)

on September 12, 2012
at 01:10 PM

+1 Great answer.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on September 12, 2012
at 01:08 PM

Emotional eating has ZERO to do with nutritional deficiencies. Also, impossible? For you, perhaps, but I'm sure someone can overeat on liver and/or broccoli. WTF? Dairy isn't nutritionally dense?

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on September 12, 2012
at 11:24 AM

Eh, not necessarily. Broccoli and veggies can take up a large volume and you'll be full WAY before digestion of carbohydrates even starts. Something sweet and carbicidal doesn't trigger your hunger/satiety hormones to signal your body and tell you "you've eaten enough, fatty." And I can absolutely overeat liver. If Vitamin A toxicity wasn't a concern, I would be having a full-size liver meal daily.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on September 12, 2012
at 11:20 AM

This is just plain ignorant.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 12, 2012
at 10:43 AM

Nice one! But some people do "Get the munchies" without the grass.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 12, 2012
at 10:42 AM

+10,000,000,000

05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

(795)

on September 12, 2012
at 07:58 AM

I tend to binge sometimes, but usually on nuts (something that I don't really allow in my diet cause I feel a slight discomfort when eating it, but I just want to stuff myself full of either almonds or sunflower seed butter) though it makes me feel yucky.

9bd33dab06ad6696b1b6a06aed818f05

(659)

on September 12, 2012
at 04:25 AM

102kg, 6ft 2", around 23% bodyfat.

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12 Answers

14
Ffff513ac686cd18c840ee12c79357ed

(1183)

on September 12, 2012
at 04:39 AM

I am a compulsive over eater too. Once nearly 400lbs though. Now 160.

Address the why. The sedation? Boredom? How do you feel after you binge? Better emotionally, but not better physically, I would imagine. Do you eat to get numb, or for the endorphins?

Doing the Whole30 will help the cravings and how you feel -- but it wont help the why. If a psychologist told you, that you could overcome being compulsive binge eater by rewarding yourself with food you need to see another psychologist.

Compulsive over eating is just a socially acceptable way of doing something compulsive. You wouldn't tell a drug addict to limit themselves to 1 high a week, a compulsive gambler to just go to the casino once a week... or a sex addict to just sleep with 1 random person. However, because we MUST EAT, you can't tell someone whos compulsion is to eat to stop eating.

Figure out the why.

A1a0baccef58499acf9ceb3c874997f2

(675)

on September 12, 2012
at 01:10 PM

+1 Great answer.

7
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 12, 2012
at 05:33 AM

EDITED: I used to be a compulsive overeater, but I no longer do it. People used to tell me it is all in my head. I used to think I was an emotional overeater and I ate because I was stressed. NOT TRUE. I stopped overeating when I started to follow Terry Wahls protocol.

I actually believe that compulsive overeating is a sign of nutritional deficiencies. Again, I am not a specialist in this area but I completely disagree with psychological dogma "it is all in your head" thing. I believe it is a biochemical reaction to malabsorption/malnutrition. I can prove my point with following:

  1. It is impossible to compulsively overeat broccoli or kale. Just try it raw and see how far you are going to overeat them.

  2. It is impossible to compulsively overeat liver. I cannot have more than 1/2 lb of liver at one time - I get full right away.

EDITED:

  1. Terry Wahls video (Part 1 but she explains cravings in another part)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEikq4x5Abc

  1. Sally Fallon video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p3ehzZ3yNyw

She explains cravings in the middle (after the first hour).

If you agree with the statements above, then start working on meeting your nutritional needs. Terry Wahls has a very good eating plan. If you follow it, it is going to be very hard to continue compulsively overeating.

Meeting your daily nutritional needs in addition to Paleo will solve many of your problems. GAPS + quality probiotics + Terry Wahls + Weston Price (stay away from grains and dairy, they are not nutritionally dense).

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on September 12, 2012
at 01:08 PM

Emotional eating has ZERO to do with nutritional deficiencies. Also, impossible? For you, perhaps, but I'm sure someone can overeat on liver and/or broccoli. WTF? Dairy isn't nutritionally dense?

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 12, 2012
at 06:32 PM

I can overeat on broccoli! (Cooked, not raw.) I love Sally Fallon, and I wholeheartedly agree that *some* cravings come from nutrient deficiencies/imbalances. But I also believe there can be emotional triggers. Now, it's possible those out-of-whack emotions are, themselves, the result of nutritional imbalances, but not always. My extreme loneliness has nothing to do with how much magnesium or vitamin A I'm taking in. I might feel less *sad* about my loneliness with better nutrition, but lack of vits & mins ain't the *cause.*

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 12, 2012
at 04:05 PM

Just watch Terry Wahls and Sally Fallon - they both explain cravings, especially sugar and fat cravings. They both explain nutritional deficiencies. As for dairy - it is NOT nutritionally dense. Compare dairy to kale or salmon. You can get the same vitamins as dairy from other nutritionally dense foods.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 12, 2012
at 06:41 PM

Amy, the question is why so many people who feel lonely/depressed/whatever ARE NOT CRAVING anything, but some people do crave stuff? Have you tried overeating raw broccoli with liver and some grass-fed butter? Try it as an experiment!

Fd7b128cf714044a86d8bd822c7a8992

(4292)

on September 13, 2012
at 01:11 AM

It's a really interesting idea and I think it has some truth, but: I can binge on lettuce. I can binge on cucumbers. Never done liver, but I can binge on chicken. If I have nuts in the house at all it's like a foregone conclusion that I'll end up binging on them. None of those things are junk food. And I eat an excellent diet full of micronutrients. Furthermore, when my diet was much, much worse (think: pasta and potatoes every day), I had 0 binging issues because my current mental health problems weren't there. If binging were due to deficiency, shouldn't it have lessened with a better diet?

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 12, 2012
at 10:42 AM

+10,000,000,000

76211ec5301087de2588cfe3d6bccba9

(1178)

on September 12, 2012
at 02:21 PM

it is completely possible to overeat vegetables when you are in binge-mode. it has more to do with a reward response/addiction i believe.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 12, 2012
at 04:02 PM

If you watch Terry Wahls video, she explains why people overeat (they are deprived of nutrients). Most sweets/fats are calorie dense foods, that's why we crave them. Sally Fallon also explains why we crave foods. There is no such thing as emotional overeating - when we are stressed, our vitamin A gets depleted (source - Sally Fallon's video) and we start craving things.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on September 12, 2012
at 11:24 AM

Eh, not necessarily. Broccoli and veggies can take up a large volume and you'll be full WAY before digestion of carbohydrates even starts. Something sweet and carbicidal doesn't trigger your hunger/satiety hormones to signal your body and tell you "you've eaten enough, fatty." And I can absolutely overeat liver. If Vitamin A toxicity wasn't a concern, I would be having a full-size liver meal daily.

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on September 12, 2012
at 01:59 PM

To me, the fact that a person wouldn't overeat broccoli or liver don't prove that cravings are the sign of a nutritional deficiency. By that logic, most people with cravings must be deficient in carbs/sugar/salt since that's generally what we crave. Which of course cannot be true - I don't think the average overeating American is deficient in sugar! I think cravings may be triggered by overall deficiency - not eating enough period - and I think it's interesting as to whether a specific deficiency causes a specific craving ,but I disagree that you've "proven" it by points 1 and 2 above.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 13, 2012
at 03:25 AM

@ Maria - nuts don't count, we binge on them for a different reason. As for cucumbers and lettuce - they are not junk food, but compared to other foods, they are NOT nutritionally dense. Terry Wahls never mentions lettuce and cucumbers. Also, you say you eat an excellent diet full of macronutrients - do you eat liver and kale on a daily basis? Have you tried Terry Wahls diet? Why pasta and potatoes did not give you cravings - for the same reason they don't give cravings to millions of people. Has your gut flora got altered somehow by antibiotics?

4
98266ae0c87836d4bb714b6d31cacbf9

on September 12, 2012
at 05:49 AM

Make it your number one priority to record what you eat the next 30 days. In fact start with one week for now. Basically keep this journal/smartphone at all times. BEFORE you even eat anything write it down, what this does it makes you aware of what you are actually going to eat and if it is unnecessary you won't eat it. Soon this will become your natural state and you won't need the journal anymore. Also analyze your emotions when you over eat.

05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

(795)

on September 12, 2012
at 07:58 AM

I tend to binge sometimes, but usually on nuts (something that I don't really allow in my diet cause I feel a slight discomfort when eating it, but I just want to stuff myself full of either almonds or sunflower seed butter) though it makes me feel yucky.

Dc6407193ba441d1438f6f0c06af872b

(4400)

on September 15, 2012
at 12:27 AM

Yes, it's a pain in the butt to record everything you eat. So if you commit to doing this, you may decide you'd rather wait an hour for dinner than eat and have to record it. Not to mention it's a bummer to record eating a huge amount of junk. It helped me, anyway.

Dc6407193ba441d1438f6f0c06af872b

(4400)

on September 15, 2012
at 12:30 AM

I definitely binged, though not like many of the commenters here. Still, for me it was really useful to record all I ate, for one reason: it's fun to binge, but it's no fun to have to record it. The humiliation, but mostly just the hassle, made it not worth it. Better to just wait until dinner to eat!

3
E565e11cf32b38ab1f45086c1e0205f7

(613)

on September 12, 2012
at 02:47 PM

lightbulb... Could both physical and psychological factors be contributing to binge eating? I battled with it in the past, and I feel that this was the case for me. I think my problem was about 70/30 physical/psychological. Tracking my diet and discovering that I had some big nutritional gaps (although I thought, before actually tracking and documenting, that I was eating a balanced diet), and also recognizing that I was suffering some blood sugar issues shed a lot of light on why I was eating the way I was. It seems to me that nutritional deficiencies and blood sugar spikes and crashes were tipping off the binge, and because I would sometimes feel better physically after binging, I came to connect that comfort with binge eating. That comfort led me to binge sometimes for largely emotional reasons.

Now that I've gotten my nutrition in order and addressed the blood sugar issues, I rarely feel the urge to binge, and to a certain extent, have lost the ability to do so. If I find myself emotionally overeating, I do often get a clearer signal than in the past to just stop.

The changes I made:

Cut out caffeine. When I come down from its stimulation I feel hangry.

Tracking my diet on cronometer. Discovered that my diet was chronically low in potassium, magnesium, and zinc. Started supplementing and focusing on getting more of these nutrients in my diet.

Started taking chromium to help with blood sugar issues.

Drinking more water. Thirst signals can be easily confused with hunger signals, especially if you're craving sweets.

Considering the true nature of cravings. Sometimes I found that I was binging and binging and binging on sweets, then realizing that what I truly wanted/needed was something salty (with a good quality sea salt) - indicating that maybe my cravings really were linked to mineral deficiency. Sometimes as soon as I made that realization, I would eat the kind of food I needed and feel satisfied. My cravings were sometimes vague and misleading.

Obviously your problem could be completely different from mine, but I would definitely recommend documenting your diet, assessing patterns that exist with your binge eating, and assuring proper nutrition. If you seem to be well-nourished and you're still having problems, then continue to look deeper into the emotional aspects of your eating.

Oh, and I totally recommend the no caffeine lifestyle as well.

3
15b482fb13aab3e8eea76d66732439cb

(120)

on September 12, 2012
at 11:05 AM

I am a compulsive overeater, and with the fellowship of the Overeaters Anonymous program, as well as a very good paleo program, have lost 222 lbs in the last year in a half.

I found that I could not eat sensibly, could not reward myself with chocolate, sugar or any other foods that I could not eat like a gentleman. One bite was too many, 1,000 is not enough. The miracle is not that I haven't had my trigger foods in a year an a half, it's that I don't want to eat that crap anymore.

I would suggest getting to a meeting, they are free, no one will lecture you, and they may have men's meeting as well.

Figuring out why I was a compulsive overeater was not enough, knowing that I was one was not enough. I needed a daily program of living that made me face the world with a new perspective.

Good luck.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 12, 2012
at 06:38 PM

+1 for great advice. And this: "One bite was too many, 1,000 is not enough."

2
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 12, 2012
at 10:57 AM

There's probably some factor of food reward/boredom built in, but most of it is going to be "I need this mineral/micronutrient, I'm starving for it" and to a lesser extent chemical addiction.

So if you eat food like products that are depleted in micronutrients, i.e. crap in a bag, you'll never satisfy the hunger. Feeding with more sugar laden crap isn't going to silence the requirement - it'll make it worse since eating refined sugar (and carbs) is going to further deplete certain nutrients such as magnesium.

Also things with artificial ingredients, i.e. color/flavor are designed to be addictive, so there's the other half of that piece. If you see high fructose corn syrup, wheat, MSG in all its forms - hiding under dozens of different names, artificial sweeteners, etc., they're all addictive.

So yeah, eating some ice cream here and there is just going to make things worse on several levels. Even if it's high quality ice cream, since it's going to be made with refined sugar. If you really want to, see if you can make your own using whole ingredients.

There's another aspect to this that's handled by the book "The Mood Cure" by Julia Ross - turns out that when we're missing certain kinds of proteins that control serotonin/dopamine levels, we start craving sweet foods. You can supplement with things like 5HTP, tyrosine, tryptophan, DLPA - there's symptom charts in the book that can guide you to which of these to supplement with in what way, so check that out. You could of course, just get lots of good quality protein from meats/fish/eggs, and get lots of greens with it.

At the same time, the level of exercise you're doing is going to demand carbs, so try to get in the good kind, sweet potatoes, etc. as they've got minerals and carrotenoids, and vitamins. But make sure you get plenty of good fats and meats at all meals.

As an example: If you're craving something sweet, one thing you can do is mash a baked sweet potato with some vanilla extract, cinnamon, a bit of coconut oil, and maybe a bit of cocoa powder (unsweetened.) If it's not sweet enough, add a bit more cinnamon, and if you really have to, some stevia.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 13, 2012
at 10:19 AM

Yup, modern engineered foods (don't just mean GMOs) are designed to fool our senses. Take them out and a while later, our senses work again. i.e. soda is designed to temporarily quench our thirst, but really the fructose, salt (yes, there's salt in some!), actually cause us to be more thirsty, so we tend to crave a second one soon after. Things like flavored chips are designed to be crunchy, but when you chew them they turn into non-filling mush - their aroma and high salt (but only from sodium, lacking other minerals) drives us to want to eat more though it's a nutritionally devoid food.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 13, 2012
at 10:24 AM

Things like MSG, fructose, caffeine, wheat, some of the artificial flavors and additives in junk food are very addictive - so if you're hooked on them, you can't trust your senses, also if you're on SAD, you're going to be a carboholic. Once you get away from the additives and high carbs for long enough, you can begin to heal, and your senses will function properly, at which point, cravings become trustworthy and indicate stuff you're actually missing from your diet.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 12, 2012
at 06:36 PM

Glad you mentioned the chemically manipulated foods, b/c I don't think anyone's body is subconsciously trying to obtain micronutrients when they're shoveling in Doritos or Little Debbie cakes. When you're *already* on a clean diet, then yes, your body might give you proper signals (craving something salty, sweet, of fatty) but when you're still addicted to what the Hartwigs (from Whole9) call "food with no brakes," then you can't *trust* the signals your body sends. Our modern processed foods are *manufactured* with the purpose of inducing unnatural cravings for more, more, more.

2
Cc77e21f3cd585c52fe7614d226b6b35

on September 12, 2012
at 05:05 AM

Are you eating enough during the day? You say you're fairly active maybe check what you should be getting each day: http://scoobysworkshop.com/calorie-calculator/ I find the days I don't eat enough I'm starving the next day to make up for it, perhaps this is what leads to the binges?

Good luck in working it out :)

0
93eea7754e6e94b6085dbabbb48c0bb7

on September 12, 2012
at 10:29 PM

Check out mindful eating. StArt meditating and doing yoga. Once conscious, listen to your body in the present. You must be aware and here now.

0
419a42d2ae909c7987bd9d58b44cb7e8

(0)

on September 12, 2012
at 03:12 PM

Hi there, Wow, can I relate to what you're saying. I know that sometimes it might seem impossible to overcome the compulsion. I spent my whole life in it. I am now out of it, and I am now devoting my life to helping others out of it. You can check out my story on www.ranaolk.com. I coach others on the path to wellness, it's free, and I would love to chat with you too.

0
5a739c24d8c83f27a168170d3c797506

(60)

on September 12, 2012
at 10:22 AM

I am also a binge-eater! Wow, doesn't that feel good to admit :) I am working through this myself without professional help (even though I likely should seek some out). It looks like everyone has already made the main comments (trying to find the 'why' you are eating, and ensuring it is not due to deficiency) However a couple things that help me are: 1. NEVER reward yourself with food. You are not a dog. If you have been 'good' today then you have to get into the mind set that keeping a good diet is also good for you. 2. NEVER eat junk alone. For me, it's often at social gatherings and I try to avoid it, but sometimes I give myself permission to have a piece of cake at a birthday party. However, I treat it like I would with alcohol...instead of the occasional 'drink' with friends, its the occasional 'piece of cake' with friends :) 3. Try not to have 'cheat' meals. When life sometimes gets tricky and I go a little crazy I'll have some dark chocolate, or a glass of wine. Full-blown cheats to a binge eater is way to hard to come back from. For me, its also too mentally damaging. If I just have a 'taste' rather than a 'cheat' I feel better and my recovery is much quicker :)

I know these 'rules' won't fix problems, but they have significantly helped me.
Cheers.

0
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 12, 2012
at 07:56 AM

This is a shot in the dark, but have you considered that your binges might be set off by something bio-mechanical like a fungal overgrowth? I have strong suspicions that compulsive actions we take, or feeling like something else is in control might be just that.

http://paleohacks.com/questions/148284/binge-eating-and-diflucan-for-candida#axzz26CV9A9Qk

It might be worth trying Diflucan or some strong probiotics and seeing what happens.

-1
84657447dbbeac53040434abe2fe22dc

(32)

on September 12, 2012
at 04:37 AM

Stop smoking pot?

Medium avatar

(2338)

on September 12, 2012
at 02:24 PM

the only time i've ever binged was when i as high.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on September 12, 2012
at 10:43 AM

Nice one! But some people do "Get the munchies" without the grass.

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on September 12, 2012
at 11:20 AM

This is just plain ignorant.

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