0

votes

What conventional meats can I eat?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created February 17, 2011 at 2:18 AM

I already have about 50 pounds of grass-fed ground beef in my freezer but for the sake of variety, I am thinking of getting some conventional meats from the grocery.If I were to eat conventional meat a couple times a week, to save some money and for a bit of variety which cuts should I buy? I always hear people talking about buying lean meats but what cuts qualify as lean, my meat knowledge is limited? I would like suggestions for pork and beef.

35a8b223ae5d863f17a8c9e3a8eed5eb

(571)

on February 17, 2011
at 05:59 PM

lol i eat similar. I've lots of grass-fed ground beef and organs in my freezer, but i don't bother buying the more expensive stuff from my farmer. (Everything is more expensive than ground beef) For variety (Steaks) i buy cuts from conventional beef.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 17, 2011
at 05:21 PM

Both the question and the answer are about conventionally farmed meat.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 17, 2011
at 05:07 PM

The question is about conventionally farmed meat. The numbers above are for conventionally farmed meat.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 17, 2011
at 05:04 PM

His question is about conventionally farmed meat. The numbers above are for conventionally farmed meat. What does wild meat (game) have to do with this?

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on February 17, 2011
at 04:30 PM

keep in mind those omega ratios are conventional percentages, wild food has much better ratios, especially large variance in pork.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 17, 2011
at 02:50 PM

Welcome. :) I love pork belly. Every once in a while I go to the supermarket and buy regular old factory-farm pork belly. Omega-6 be damned! :) I live in a neighborhood with lots of third-world immigrants so the supermarkets here carry lots of interesting cuts of meat.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 17, 2011
at 02:48 PM

Welcome. :) I love pork belly. Every once in a while I go to the supermarket and buy regular old pork belly. Omega-6 be damned! :) (I live in a neighborhood with lots of third-world immigrants so the supermarkets here carry lots of interesting cuts of meat.)

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on February 17, 2011
at 02:45 PM

I also think the whole lean cut thing is overrated, but I prefer not to eat the fat off conventional meats.

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on February 17, 2011
at 02:44 PM

woops ton not tone

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on February 17, 2011
at 02:43 PM

I wish I had a butcher hahhaa....but I already have a tone of grass-fed liver and bones in my freezer. I know it's weird for me to ask for advice on what conventional meats to eat when I have a freezer filled with grass-fed meat, but I just want some variety and don't want to shell out anymore money for there grass-fed counterpart. I am guessing once a week of conventional meat won't hurt.

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on February 17, 2011
at 02:40 PM

Wow, thanks a lot. That is some fascinating information. It's to bad about pork belly, I really want to try it, but I can't find any good quality pork belly cuts anywhere.

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on February 17, 2011
at 11:54 AM

sorry I know that doesn't exactly answer the question, I am just understanding you are preoccupied about spending too much.

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 17, 2011
at 02:39 AM

I eat conventional meats all the time because that is what my budget allows. I like rump roast, which is a good buy. I make it in the crock pot.

  • 0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

    asked by

    (1146)
  • Views
    4.7K
  • Last Activity
    1378D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

5 Answers

5
82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 17, 2011
at 02:17 PM

The main problem with the fat in conventional meat is that it contains an unhealthy ratio of omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. That's what makes grassfed fat better.

The ratio is different in various species, and the difference is tremendous.

Therefore, the first consideration is not which cut, but which species.

Beef (regardless of whether it's raised on grain or grass) has relatively little omega-6, so it is the healthiest conventional meat. Lamb comes close. Pork is a distant third, and chicken -- forget about it. Here are the numbers for the composition of grainfed fat:

  • Beef . . . 3.1% omega-6 . . . 0.6% omega-3
  • Lamb is almost as good as beef.
  • Pork . . . 10.2% omega-6 . . . 1.0% omega-3
  • Duck . . . 12.0% omega-6 . . . 1.0% omega-3
  • Chicken . . . 19.5% omega-6 . . . 1.0% omega-3

    Source: Jaminet, Paul and Shou-Ching. Perfect Health Diet. YingYang Press: Cambridge (2010). Page 112.

(The difference between grain-fed and grass-fed meat isn't the amount of omega-6 fat. It's the amount of omega-3 fat. Omega-6 stays the same regardless of feed, but omega-3 changes.)

Note that pork has three times as much omega-6 as beef. All other things being equal, if you have to eat grain-fed meat, you're about three times better off eating beef or lamb than pork.

what cuts qualify as lean, my meat knowledge is limited?

Some of the fat in meat is visible to the eye as white or yellow streaks called marbling. The amount of marbling varies from one animal to the another, so each package you see in the store is different. You should, of course, pick out meat that has as little marbling as possible.

In addition, meat also has a lot of invisible fat. This is where a list comes in handy. The following cuts of beef are said to be the leanest ones.

Numbers (where shown) are grams of lipid per grams of meat. The source is the USDA database. All meat is raw and boneless. For beef, the grade is select.

  • Beef, eye of round (roast or steak)
  • Beef, sirloin tip side steak . . . 3.24
  • Beef, top round (roast or steak)
  • Beef, bottom round roast or steak ) . . . 3.83
  • Beef, top sirloin steak

In addition, I found the following in the USDA database myself. They may be synonyms for the cuts listed above, I don't know.

  • Beef, tip round roast . . . 3.35
  • Beef, flank steak . . . 5.00
  • Beef, tri-tip roast . . . 7.68

And now for pork.

  • Pork, loin, tenderloin . . . 2.17
  • Pork, loin, sirloin ( chops or roasts) . . . 4.22
  • Pork, loin, center rib (chops or roasts) . . . 6.48

And now for something completely different:

  • Pork belly . . . 53.01

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 17, 2011
at 02:50 PM

Welcome. :) I love pork belly. Every once in a while I go to the supermarket and buy regular old factory-farm pork belly. Omega-6 be damned! :) I live in a neighborhood with lots of third-world immigrants so the supermarkets here carry lots of interesting cuts of meat.

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on February 17, 2011
at 02:40 PM

Wow, thanks a lot. That is some fascinating information. It's to bad about pork belly, I really want to try it, but I can't find any good quality pork belly cuts anywhere.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 17, 2011
at 05:21 PM

Both the question and the answer are about conventionally farmed meat.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on February 17, 2011
at 04:30 PM

keep in mind those omega ratios are conventional percentages, wild food has much better ratios, especially large variance in pork.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 17, 2011
at 05:07 PM

The question is about conventionally farmed meat. The numbers above are for conventionally farmed meat.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 17, 2011
at 02:48 PM

Welcome. :) I love pork belly. Every once in a while I go to the supermarket and buy regular old pork belly. Omega-6 be damned! :) (I live in a neighborhood with lots of third-world immigrants so the supermarkets here carry lots of interesting cuts of meat.)

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 17, 2011
at 05:04 PM

His question is about conventionally farmed meat. The numbers above are for conventionally farmed meat. What does wild meat (game) have to do with this?

1
9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on February 17, 2011
at 11:50 AM

Try asking the butcher for any left over organs and bones, tell him/her you have a dog (I do this). Chicken gizzards are very cheap here and a very good meat.

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on February 17, 2011
at 02:44 PM

woops ton not tone

9e7039b63b656582f66d84c5255b436d

(1132)

on February 17, 2011
at 11:54 AM

sorry I know that doesn't exactly answer the question, I am just understanding you are preoccupied about spending too much.

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on February 17, 2011
at 02:43 PM

I wish I had a butcher hahhaa....but I already have a tone of grass-fed liver and bones in my freezer. I know it's weird for me to ask for advice on what conventional meats to eat when I have a freezer filled with grass-fed meat, but I just want some variety and don't want to shell out anymore money for there grass-fed counterpart. I am guessing once a week of conventional meat won't hurt.

1
65430e39d7e9e9322718d016fe668051

(2944)

on February 17, 2011
at 02:48 AM

I can't afford organic chicken all the time but I compromise by buying frozen chicken breasts from whole foods. I think the brand is Nature's Rancher or something like that. They have no hormones or antibiotics and are cage-free.... not ideal but better than conventional chicken. The bags are 2.5 lbs for $9.99. If it comes down to organic (or local/unconventionally farmed) veggies or organic (etc) meat, I always pick the meat.

0
531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

on February 17, 2011
at 05:58 PM

Costco favorites include leg of lamb (4.99/lb) and pork tenderloin (2.98/lb); also "stew beef" for 3.69/lb or chuck roast for about the same.

I buy a split quarter of grassfed beef every few months but supplement with supermarket meats. I'm still alive. Still feeling good. Sometimes just for kicks I'll even get some pastured chicken from the folks I get my grassfed beef from. They feed 'em grain like everyone else and the fatty acid profile sucks but damn if a chicken isn't accomodating to prepare and eat...and pricewise even the pastured leg/thigh pieces are $3.50/lb.

I like some of the big chain supermarkets because there's always a deal on something if you're not discriminating. Have crockpot will buy whatever...

-1
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on February 17, 2011
at 04:10 AM

Leaner meats have less white fat and marbling on them. When you see the white stuff, that is the fat. No white stuff, no fat. The marbling and fat is the tastiest part and I just go ahead and eat it because I am not afraid to eat a bit of fat. I think the whole lean cut thing is way over rated.

As for conventional meats, any wild caught fish is a good option. It is marked on the package if the fish is wild caught or farmed.

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on February 17, 2011
at 02:45 PM

I also think the whole lean cut thing is overrated, but I prefer not to eat the fat off conventional meats.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!