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What about the tallow?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 11, 2011 at 5:54 PM

OK, so I bought a calf. Yes, the whole thing....grass fed and all (amazing bone broth, BTW!) It pretty much filled my brand-new 21-cu foot freezer, for which I am grateful, given my hubby's job loss just this week.

When she delivered, the rancher gave me a bag of tallow, which looks like kind of pinkish extruded stuff. She said it was all the tallow from both calves because grass-fed beef is pretty lean (my brother also bought a calf, but he was willing to let me have his tallow). It wasn't much - maybe five pounds.

The rancher mentioned making soap, which is something I am familiar with, but isn't beef tallow also edible? Couldn't I use it for cooking? Or is that just for lard....I am a little confused here.

If I should be able to use it for cooking, I'd love to hear some suggestions as to how to use it. Would I just render it and use it like lard?

5de2fffda92c0bf2be7ede10cad55546

(1781)

on February 15, 2011
at 07:04 AM

YES YES! wonderful tallow. Many uses but don't make soap with it. Render it slowly at a low temp and it shouldn't have much smell or taste. I rendered a big jar and use it for everything, even found myself just eating it.

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

(1932)

on February 14, 2011
at 07:30 PM

Thank you all for these great answers! I really don't want to "waste" my tallow on soap when I can eat it, which is what prompted my question. Now I have a much better idea of the direction I'll take. Again, thanks much!

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 12, 2011
at 05:05 AM

If the heat is low enough, there's no stink. The cracklings taste better too. (They aren't really cracklings, they are too soft, but I don't know what else to call them.) I've started rendering in boiling water to keep the temperature down, even though it's more work. The water becomes fantastic broth too.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 12, 2011
at 05:04 AM

If the heat is low enough, there's no stink. The cracklings taste better too. (They aren't really cracklings, they are too soft, but I don't know what else to call them.) I've started rendering in water to keep the temperature down, even though it's more work.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 12, 2011
at 05:04 AM

If the heat is low enough, there's no stink. The cracklings taste better too. (They aren't really cracklings, they are too soft, but I don't know what else to call them.) I've switched to rendering in boiling water to keep the temperature down, even though it's more work.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 12, 2011
at 05:03 AM

If the heat is low enough, there's no stink. The cracklings taste better too. (They aren't really cracklings, they are too soft, but I don't know what else to call them.) I've started rendering in boiling water to keep the temperature down, even though it's more work.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 12, 2011
at 05:03 AM

If the heat is low enough, there's no stink. The cracklings taste better too. (They aren't really cracklings, they are too soft, but I don't know what else to call them.) I've started rendering in boil water to keep the temperature down, even though it's more work.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 12, 2011
at 05:02 AM

If the heat is low enough, it doesn't stink. The left over stuff (they are too soft to call it cracklings) tastes better too. I've started rendering int boiling in water to keep the temperature down.

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3 Answers

1
2b8c327d1296a96ad64cdadc7dffa72d

on February 11, 2011
at 06:21 PM

Here is a link to rendering tallow: http://www.cheeseslave.com/2009/07/09/how-to-render-lard-tallow/

And here is another for making soap: http://candleandsoap.about.com/od/soapmakingoils/ss/rendertallow.htm

The rendering part is similar, what you do after that is dependent upon what you want. Good luck!

0
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on February 11, 2011
at 06:38 PM

A week ago I made tallow for the first time. I use it for cooking just like lard. Tallow has a stronger beef taste than lard has a pork taste, so be sure the taste goes well with what your cooking. If I had as much as 5 pounds, I would try making pemmican.

Heads up to those who make their own: be prepared to endure a stinky house for awhile.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 12, 2011
at 05:03 AM

If the heat is low enough, there's no stink. The cracklings taste better too. (They aren't really cracklings, they are too soft, but I don't know what else to call them.) I've started rendering in boil water to keep the temperature down, even though it's more work.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 12, 2011
at 05:03 AM

If the heat is low enough, there's no stink. The cracklings taste better too. (They aren't really cracklings, they are too soft, but I don't know what else to call them.) I've started rendering in boiling water to keep the temperature down, even though it's more work.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 12, 2011
at 05:02 AM

If the heat is low enough, it doesn't stink. The left over stuff (they are too soft to call it cracklings) tastes better too. I've started rendering int boiling in water to keep the temperature down.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 12, 2011
at 05:04 AM

If the heat is low enough, there's no stink. The cracklings taste better too. (They aren't really cracklings, they are too soft, but I don't know what else to call them.) I've switched to rendering in boiling water to keep the temperature down, even though it's more work.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 12, 2011
at 05:04 AM

If the heat is low enough, there's no stink. The cracklings taste better too. (They aren't really cracklings, they are too soft, but I don't know what else to call them.) I've started rendering in water to keep the temperature down, even though it's more work.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 12, 2011
at 05:05 AM

If the heat is low enough, there's no stink. The cracklings taste better too. (They aren't really cracklings, they are too soft, but I don't know what else to call them.) I've started rendering in boiling water to keep the temperature down, even though it's more work. The water becomes fantastic broth too.

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

(1932)

on February 14, 2011
at 07:30 PM

Thank you all for these great answers! I really don't want to "waste" my tallow on soap when I can eat it, which is what prompted my question. Now I have a much better idea of the direction I'll take. Again, thanks much!

0
A39d8f5dfc5ac23a9ba3d3ccf85c0632

(190)

on February 11, 2011
at 06:01 PM

We get tallow from our local farmer, we simply cut off pieces and let the fat melt off before using. It's WONDERFUL - doesn't work the same way as lard since it doesn't completely render, but it works to provide good fat the same way. Enjoy!

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