3

votes

Steak dinner... hold the butter?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 23, 2012 at 5:24 PM

I searched to see if this was posted before but nothing came up. My apologies in advance if this has been posted before.

So I came across this study Changes in atherogenic dyslipidemia induced by carbohydrate restriction in men are dependent on dietary protein source which I thought was pretty interesting. Atherogenic dyslipidemia is a cholesterol pattern which leads to hardening of the arteries.

They are basically contrasting the levels of cholesterol between saturated fat from butter vs saturated fat from plant source in conjunction to beef consumption. The exerpt does not specify whether it is grass-fed beef or conventional beef; but my assumption would be that it's conventional beef since that is the most applicable source to the average beef-consumer.

What's interesting to note is that they found a correlation between higher saturated fat consumption interacting with a micronutrient in beef on lipoprotein metabolism.

I don't think this is anything to get your panties in a knot over. But it might be something to take into consideration.

Your thoughts?

Personally, I would love to see this study done with grass-fed beef to see if maybe the hormones and preservatives in conventional beef have any impact on saturated fat interaction with beef. But it certainly won't

Fab409ac4a30957e3ed508514f7bff02

(295)

on June 24, 2012
at 02:21 PM

I just wanted to add that the study had people eating beef for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and Krauss says that previous studies showed that mixed protein sources (e.g. chicken, fish, etc.) did not show any problems. This is why they are looking into the effects the SFA might have on micronutrients that are specific to beef. As a follow-up to superoxide dismutase, even if SFA inhibit the absorption of key nutrients for its formation in humans, there is not much of copper and manganese in ground beef, but I suppose it could effect those nutrients coming from other food in the same meal.

Fab409ac4a30957e3ed508514f7bff02

(295)

on June 24, 2012
at 02:07 PM

@Jamie, the 2 diets had the same number of calories from fat - the difference was that one was primarily MUFA from olive oil and the other was SAFA primarily from dairy. So one could get their energy from MUFA - I don't see this as an issue. Also, as you say, the effects may be different with a different fat sources (e.g. coconut vs dairy).

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on June 24, 2012
at 09:45 AM

But then again, LDL theory of heart disease just seems totally BS. You should research it here, before you decide that LDL matters.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on June 24, 2012
at 08:28 AM

You could always use coconut oil if your worried. Lauric acid has little impact on LDL.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on June 24, 2012
at 08:27 AM

Cant really make any conclusions without reading the paper, and getting more info on the actual total diet, except that the high LDL theory is itself a weak correlation, its not a proven causation. Odd though, very the idea of a low fat, low carb diet. Where doesnt one gets ones energy from? Protein cant really sub well as an energy source as far as I know. (Certain aminos can be converted to glucose, but its even less efficient than fat conversion from what I understand). I suspect such a diet would be highly unhealthy.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on June 24, 2012
at 08:22 AM

Atherogenic dyslipidemia is produced from high carb, low fat diets, so in most studies, given the majority of high fat eaters also eat refined carbs and sugars, this seems like a sensible conclusion i think - sat fat + high gi & g/l foods= lots of small dense LDL and high heart disease risk.

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on June 24, 2012
at 05:37 AM

Just wondering why this was voted down? Would like to know if I said something inaccurate.

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2 Answers

1
Fab409ac4a30957e3ed508514f7bff02

(295)

on June 24, 2012
at 06:29 AM

I don't have the full study - just searched google and found this and this commentary besides the abstract.

For one, it was a randomized cross-over study looking at differences of 2 low-carb diets (compared to baseline), one contained a higher amount of saturated fat (vs MUFA) than the other. Both diets contained lean beef and the different types of fat were added in addition to the beef, so I fail to see how the source of the beef effects the results.

From this interview it looks like the study authors think the saturated fat is increasing absorption of the iron in the beef which is causing the adverse lipid profile, but he emphasizes that they don't know yet at this point why there is a difference. Also, Krauss has this to say about serum ferritin levels in case people jump the gun on this and go get their blood levels tested:

We have tested a standard lab marker for iron status, serum ferritin, but have not found it to correlate with lipid responses to a high beef diet. There are other analyses that could be more informative but not yet in the standard repertoire, and we plan to test these in our current study.

Ron Krauss

Also, in the comments, Jane points out that in rats SAFA inhibit the absorption of copper and manganese which may affect the antioxidant superoxide dismutase.

Looks like a study to throw into the follow-up pile! Thanks.

Fab409ac4a30957e3ed508514f7bff02

(295)

on June 24, 2012
at 02:21 PM

I just wanted to add that the study had people eating beef for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, and Krauss says that previous studies showed that mixed protein sources (e.g. chicken, fish, etc.) did not show any problems. This is why they are looking into the effects the SFA might have on micronutrients that are specific to beef. As a follow-up to superoxide dismutase, even if SFA inhibit the absorption of key nutrients for its formation in humans, there is not much of copper and manganese in ground beef, but I suppose it could effect those nutrients coming from other food in the same meal.

1
03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

on June 24, 2012
at 02:16 AM

I didn't read your link (not yet but I will when I have time to concentrate) but I think that you have to look at what else you are eating in addition to the fat. Is the person eating sugar and carbs along with the fat? I am of the opinion that the sugar and carbs are what make destroy the epithelial lining of the blood vessels making it easy for the cholesterol to stick and cause problems.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on June 24, 2012
at 08:22 AM

Atherogenic dyslipidemia is produced from high carb, low fat diets, so in most studies, given the majority of high fat eaters also eat refined carbs and sugars, this seems like a sensible conclusion i think - sat fat + high gi & g/l foods= lots of small dense LDL and high heart disease risk.

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on June 24, 2012
at 05:37 AM

Just wondering why this was voted down? Would like to know if I said something inaccurate.

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