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St. Patty's Day meals...

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created March 07, 2012 at 3:46 PM

So with St. Patty's Day coming up, I was just wondering what are acceptable meals. Corned beef is one my absolute favorite things in the world. When it goes through the curing process I understand it can be heavy on the salt. Is it still considered Paleo though?

I can deal with no steam potatoes and cabbage...but I need me some corned beef...and lots of it! LOL

Medium avatar

(19469)

on March 07, 2012
at 09:45 PM

Why no potatoes or cabbage? Every year my wife and I brine a fresh brisket at home (which gives you total control over the brining solution ingredients) and it is way better than any of the prebrined briskets that you'd buy at the store. I tend to wash this all down with some non-Paleo Guinness as well :)

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on March 07, 2012
at 07:34 PM

Blueballoon, thanks for the good report. How kind of you to post. Your dinner sounds scrumptious! :)

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on March 07, 2012
at 06:59 PM

I have made AB's recipe several times now. I love it. (I don't honestly mind the bit of sugar in the brine, since I don't exactly eat all of it. :) In fact, I've got a finished brisket cooking right now for dinner. Yum.

7d64d3988de1b0e493aacf37843c5596

(2861)

on March 07, 2012
at 04:11 PM

Anything (that you are not too sensitive to) is acceptable if it is a special occasion.

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5 Answers

3
0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on March 07, 2012
at 04:24 PM

You do not need our permission to eat an old world food, some meats are cured with sugar and that is a big difference than adding a cup for your sweet tooth. Enjoy it all.

3
193b7fb0fec8913d5ebb3b99a04d21c6

(2918)

on March 07, 2012
at 04:00 PM

Well I bought a package of Vienna Beef corned beef for St Pat's and here are the ingredients:

Beef cured with: Water, Salt, Sugar, Sodium Erythorbate, Sodium Nitrite, Flavoring.

So, um, traditionally not Paleo with the sugar and nitrates and weird unpronouncable stuff. For a once a year meal, sure.

I'll bet that you could find a more Paleo version of that anyway.

Why no cabbage? If you're avoiding potatoes, I get that, but sweet wonderful steamed cabbage? Mmmmmmm.

2
D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

on March 07, 2012
at 05:28 PM

Here is a corned beef recipe you might like. There are nice photos at that blog page. This recipe could easily be adapted, using sea salt rather than kosher salt, for example.

Corning the Beef Brisket, adapted from Alton Brown???s Good Eats

1 (4- to 5-lb) beef brisket, trimmed

2 quarts water

1 cup kosher salt

1/2 cup brown sugar

1 cinnamon stick, broken into several pieces

1 tsp mustard seeds

1 tsp black peppercorns

8 whole cloves

8 whole allspice berries

12 whole juniper berries

2 bay leaves, crumbled

1/2 tsp ground ginger

2 pounds ice (optional)

Place the water into a large stockpot along with salt, sugar, cinnamon stick, mustard seeds, peppercorns, cloves, allspice, juniper berries, bay leaves and ginger. Cook over high heat until the salt and sugar have dissolved. The aromatic fragrance of the spices is simply amazing.

Remove from the heat and add the ice. Stir until the ice has melted. Ice is added to cool down the solution but you can totally skip this and just refrigerate the brine until it reaches a temperature of 45 degrees F.

Once it has cooled, place the brisket in a 2-gallon zip top bag and add the brine. Seal and lay flat inside a container, cover and place in the refrigerator for at least 10 days. Check daily to make sure the beef is completely submerged and stir the brine. If you don???t have a huge zip top bag, brine the brisket in a large tupperware container and make sure to flip the brisket each day to make sure that all of the brisket comes in contact with the brine.

Cooking the Beef Brisket

1 small onion, quartered

1 large carrot, coarsely chopped

1 stalk celery, coarsely chopped

After at least 10 days, remove the brisket from the brine and rinse well under cool water. Place the brisket into a pot just large enough to hold the meat, add the onion, carrot and celery and cover with water. Set over high heat and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to low, cover and gently simmer for 2 1/2 to 3 hours or until the meat is fork tender.

Remove from the pot and thinly slice across the grain.

There are so many wonderful things you can do with corned beef. On the top of my list is a tasty Reuben sandwich: thin slices of corned beef with sauerkraut, Swiss cheese and Thousand Island dressing on lightly toasted rye bread. And a personal favorite is crusty corned beef hash with eggs.

This corned beef recipe is based on a recipe taken from Alton Brown???s Good Eats minus the salt peter.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on March 07, 2012
at 07:34 PM

Blueballoon, thanks for the good report. How kind of you to post. Your dinner sounds scrumptious! :)

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on March 07, 2012
at 06:59 PM

I have made AB's recipe several times now. I love it. (I don't honestly mind the bit of sugar in the brine, since I don't exactly eat all of it. :) In fact, I've got a finished brisket cooking right now for dinner. Yum.

2
Medium avatar

(2923)

on March 07, 2012
at 04:05 PM

Initial pre-boil to cook and remove some of the salt then dump the boiling liquid. Then you can do a second boil with a small handful of spices in the water for extra flavor (peppercorns and whole cloves are a good choice) or you can fry it in a pan (corned beef hash) or heat it in the oven (it is a brisket after all).

Cabbage is completely paleo (and very good for you, lots of sulfur). And most strains of paleo/primal won't begrudge you bathing it in clarified butter. If you want to be fancy then substitute in red cabbage, Napa cabbage, or bok choy for the white cabbage.

For the potatoes, if you allow "safe starches" then it's good to go, maybe some olive oil to finish it off. Otherwise, Well Fed has a recipe for Mashed Cauliflower. Or you can go some other variants, mashed turnip, mashed parsnips, mashed Jerusalem artichokes (basically, most of the root vegetables will adapt).

0
E34fbfa1bca9ae970c9c7313bf9de9f8

(1436)

on March 07, 2012
at 04:34 PM

Colconon! I don't avoid potatoes.

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