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Oven roasting beef - please help!

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created January 16, 2013 at 1:09 PM

I have a freezer full of grass-fed beef (roasts), but ruin it everytime I cook it!

I have tried to slow-cook method (200 farenheit for about 4 hours) and have also tried starting out with a super hot oven (450) for half an hour and then reducing to low temp for another 2 or so hours. I know that there are variations in cuts of beef that will impact the results but I have tried many cuts and many methods and still always end up with a tough roast at the end. Should I be cooking longer? Any tips would be appreciated!

361e96d70d6d3b91d63f6ad975e60ab6

(840)

on January 16, 2013
at 02:07 PM

Yeah slow cooker, low temp for 8+ hours is great.

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9 Answers

2
489497642ad41d4b45db4d07dbe54353

(978)

on January 16, 2013
at 02:01 PM

You have to temper the method to the meat. Just calling it a roast is not enough info, you need to know the specific cut. Some will work best with long and low, maybe with browning on the stovetop first, and water or other liquid in the pan. This is braising, and is best for tough cuts. Others will do best if left rare in the middle, so start high, end low, but don't overdo. A rib roast is one of these.

So, first Get A Thermometer! If you are new to roasting, this will teach you about times, levels of doneness and help you not have to guess. This is mostly for those cuts you want to leave rare. I want the middle of my rare beef to be at 120??F, I pull it out of the oven at 115. The heat from the outside finished the cooking. If you want it more done, check the charts available all over the internet.

Second, figure out what specific cut you have and look it up on the internet. Read a few ideas. For grass-fed, if you are starting high, you might not want it to be quite so high. Unless you have a good fat-cap, then you can go high.

The thing you want to avoid is the middle zone. Rare beef is tender, cuts with a lot of connective tissue will still be hard to chew. Very well done beef is tender, the proteins are completely denatured and the connective tissue is turned into gelatin. In the middle, the proteins have tightened up, the connective tissue is still whole, and you are panicking on whether you have not cooked it enough or over cooked it, so you pull it out of the oven, and it is at the worst time to eat it.

2
2aa70e52f948a66bdc3bfdecb0498987

on January 16, 2013
at 01:47 PM

I cook mine in a crock pot with 1-2 cups of water (depending on size)and all of my veggies added. I usually do 6 hours but longer if I will not be home. It is so tender and juicy I can easily pull it apart with a fork.

361e96d70d6d3b91d63f6ad975e60ab6

(840)

on January 16, 2013
at 02:07 PM

Yeah slow cooker, low temp for 8+ hours is great.

1
Medium avatar

(3213)

on January 16, 2013
at 02:04 PM

Try this: Season a chunk of beef with salt pepper and melted butter, wrap in aluminum foil, roast for 6 hours at 275??F, save the juices and use as Au Jus, enjoy!

Come back and let me know how it comes out

1
45ace03a0eff1219943d746cfb1c4197

(3661)

on January 16, 2013
at 01:59 PM

I would suggest a lot longer if it's a cut that needs slow, moist heat. You can do this covered in the oven, even all day if you're keeping your heat low. At 200 degrees, depending on the size of the roast, 18 hours might even be required. The crock pot also works well.

Specifying what cuts of meat you're using would help us be more exact. Tender cuts or rare roasts are a whole other story.

0
F891e7b1cbbbe3838c9bba9ff78aa3ed

on January 17, 2013
at 01:20 PM

Also try tomatoes the acid in them will break down the fat more and make it tender. Brown your meat on the stovetop and then throw it in with a can of diced tomatoes and some broth. (I know not exactly paleo on the canned tomatoes but much easier).

0
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on January 16, 2013
at 03:57 PM

There is a slight possibility the problem is in your freezer and not in your cooking method. The one time I did a bulk purchase of grass fed beef, well the people who went in with me ended up giving me the stuff they didn't use. It was tough and just didn't taste as good as what they could find at the supermarket. I understood where they were coming from, but I ate it anyway because I figured it was still good for me.

Add fat, and if you begin to suspect it is the meat, use it in a stew, or a curry. Think more along the lines of a game animal (like venison) rather than beef. If you look at venison recipes, you may be able to figure out something.

0
Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

on January 16, 2013
at 03:00 PM

I sear my roasts, then cook them in a covered pan. Try adding a cup of water to the pan.

0
40b065644e95a090f6a41808303773ae

on January 16, 2013
at 02:31 PM

I usually buy a bottom round roast and do the "450 for ~30 mins" trick, but I shut the oven off after the 30 and let it sit for 2 hours without opening the door -- not lowering the heat and continuing to cook it.

Comes out great every time.

0
Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on January 16, 2013
at 01:13 PM

It sounds like you know this, but you want to do an initial roasting at high heat to sear the surface and then finish at low heat to cook the interior, e.g.:

http://www.meadowmaidfoods.com/recipes/oven_roast_beef.htm

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