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jerky/pemmican drying temperatures

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 31, 2012 at 10:47 PM

I have seen recommended temperatures for making beef jerky/pemmican at 100 degrees f and 150 degrees f. Can anyone discusss the virtues or drawbacks of either? I've been doing it at 150 degrees.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on September 20, 2012
at 03:36 PM

The Excalibur brand is pretty darn good (that's what I have) - http://www.excaliburdehydrator.com/ . If not that brand, I think most would argue for side-fan as opposed to stacked trays w/ bottom fan, as those tend to need the trays rearranged more often during dehydration. Pick up some "teflon sheets" (pretty sure they are not teflon, and probably something like nylon) if you ever want to dehydrate stuff that can't sit across a mesh (e.g. fruit rollups, yogurt, etc). A jerky gun is handy for making ground beef jerky, but not required.

05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

(795)

on September 20, 2012
at 01:16 AM

Could you recommend a dehydrator? I been eating meat raw lol so I think I could probably withstand some of the "unsafeness" lol

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on September 19, 2012
at 01:39 PM

Hypothetically, that's the perfect internal temperature - enzymes will begin to break down higher than that temperature. You will get a lower internal temperature than the air in the dehydrator or oven. However, remember: jerky is made safe to consume by drying, which inhibits bacterial growth, and not cooking. You have wiggle room -- but play it safe. The most important thing I can offer: learn your dehydrator -- they all act differently.

05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

(795)

on September 19, 2012
at 01:58 AM

so you want to be at a temp of 117 F? so why don't you run you dehydrator at that temp? I am curious because I want to start making my own jerky and there are so many methods but I want a method that keeps all nutrients/enzymes intact

05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

(795)

on September 19, 2012
at 01:57 AM

so you want to be at a temp of 117 F? so why don't you run you dehydrator at that temp?

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3 Answers

1
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on September 01, 2012
at 12:37 AM

The magic internal temperature is 117F - above that temperature, proteins/enzymes in any food will begin to denature. The air temperature in the dehydrator is going to be higher than that. Dehydrating is not about cooking food from heat - it's about removing all moisture so that the food is preserved and will not spoil.

I run my dehydrator at about 140-155F for jerky. Every dehydrator is different, and you should learn yours a bit before trying an expensive portion of meat. ;-)

Once all the moisture is gone from the meat, you can proceed making the pemmican as usual, or just eat it as jerky.

05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

(795)

on September 19, 2012
at 01:57 AM

so you want to be at a temp of 117 F? so why don't you run you dehydrator at that temp?

05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

(795)

on September 19, 2012
at 01:58 AM

so you want to be at a temp of 117 F? so why don't you run you dehydrator at that temp? I am curious because I want to start making my own jerky and there are so many methods but I want a method that keeps all nutrients/enzymes intact

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on September 19, 2012
at 01:39 PM

Hypothetically, that's the perfect internal temperature - enzymes will begin to break down higher than that temperature. You will get a lower internal temperature than the air in the dehydrator or oven. However, remember: jerky is made safe to consume by drying, which inhibits bacterial growth, and not cooking. You have wiggle room -- but play it safe. The most important thing I can offer: learn your dehydrator -- they all act differently.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on September 20, 2012
at 03:36 PM

The Excalibur brand is pretty darn good (that's what I have) - http://www.excaliburdehydrator.com/ . If not that brand, I think most would argue for side-fan as opposed to stacked trays w/ bottom fan, as those tend to need the trays rearranged more often during dehydration. Pick up some "teflon sheets" (pretty sure they are not teflon, and probably something like nylon) if you ever want to dehydrate stuff that can't sit across a mesh (e.g. fruit rollups, yogurt, etc). A jerky gun is handy for making ground beef jerky, but not required.

05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

(795)

on September 20, 2012
at 01:16 AM

Could you recommend a dehydrator? I been eating meat raw lol so I think I could probably withstand some of the "unsafeness" lol

0
Efd28623add25421afa2884b466163c4

(163)

on September 19, 2012
at 01:13 AM

I use a cardboard box and 100 watt bulb. I can't remember the temperature it gets to but I want to say around 105F. The taste and texture is better than regular jerky and miles ahead of store-bought. However, it does take 2-3 days to completely dry it out.

0
C16aed2d83525d4d1d560fa67b579702

on August 31, 2012
at 11:37 PM

I have done it before and shoot for about 150-160, mainly due to food safety concerns. The "temperature danger zone" is between 40 and 135 deg. fahrenheit.

Plus, the higher temperature would hasten the drying of the jerky. I used convection ovens with the jerky sitting on a metal grate to facilitate drying around and underneath the jerky.

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