2

votes

is grass fed beef from stores also grass finished?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 06, 2012 at 4:16 AM

specifically from whole foods, trader joes, and fresh and easy.

claim to be grass fed, but are they also grass finished like from ordering directly from ranches?

E791387b2829c660292308092dc3ca9b

(831)

on November 12, 2012
at 05:35 PM

Laura's Lean would be the best thing at Kroger's. They do feed some grain but the cattle are left on pasture and not feedlotted.

C0237fd9e277fcef496d538beda1f35b

(287)

on November 09, 2012
at 01:32 AM

I can actually buy the bison meat at our Krogers. They don't sell grass-fed beef though.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 06, 2012
at 09:23 PM

I should have gotten the +4 wtf

366c23d69eadce094a2b22299c58a424

(2988)

on November 06, 2012
at 04:09 PM

TheArcaneOne is correct. It is difficult to keep dairy cows producing without supplementing grains in the winter, but cows grown for meat do not need to be fed supplemental grains.

D7854f42e1c1d92f22b3903cd5d4a438

(218)

on November 06, 2012
at 12:49 PM

The farm I get my beef from feeds their cows hay during the winter which is just dried grass.

05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

(795)

on November 06, 2012
at 07:37 AM

if you doubt it, call the farm that provides that whole foods with the meat. usually whole foods displays which farms they get their meat from, and is usually local, when in doubt call and ask to see if you can visit the farm. That is what I do.

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6 Answers

6
C936fc70adc6330f3e3340984aba8eb1

on November 06, 2012
at 04:48 PM

As a grassfed rancher myself, we raise Angus/Wagyu grassfed beef, i thought i would weigh in on this. i agree that the best way to find out about whole foods is to ask them, they are usually good about disclosing any info about where their meat or produce are sourced.

But I wanted to respond to the question about what they are fed in the winter. for us, and for most grassfed ranch operations i assume, we feed hay, primarily alfalfa, that we grow, swath and bale ourselves. Hay is also "grass" and provides the health benefits that are associated with grassfed beef. It does take an extra season to get a grassfed steer or heifer to weight, about 1200 pounds, meaning it takes about 22 months instead of 14 or so if they fatten them up on corn in a feed lot, and that means that our calves are with us for two winters. they are born in the spring, usually feb or Mar and then make weight sometime almost 2 years later. So, keeping them healthy, well fed and happy throught all that time is critical.

1
C936fc70adc6330f3e3340984aba8eb1

on November 06, 2012
at 04:52 PM

Also, i just wanted to clarify some beef "lingo" so we are using the same terminology. Grassfed means grass finished, at least it should. There are some out there that call anything that was ever on grass, even just as a calf "grassfed". Grassfed means grass and only grass, ever. You can get more info about it and the certification of grassfed beef producers from the American Grassfed Association at www.americangrassfed.org.

There you can find a list of inspected, certified grassfed producers. that is the only way you can be sure you're getting what you want.

1
34997c76c8ce232f28942f233e180f18

on November 06, 2012
at 04:27 AM

I noticed Whole Foods has the tag saying "100% grass fed", however I remember only seeing this on lamb and maybe pork. As far as beef goes, I can't really comment as I purchase my grassfed beef online. I found that their grassfed beef livers were very good and cheaper than where I get my beef from too.

Of course it depends where it is sourced from. I think it would be best to ask one of the butchers or better yet, Whole Foods lists where the meat was sourced from so you could probably visit the website/call the place and find out yourself.

0
96fdd625758e32fbe401fb642ec39447

on November 08, 2012
at 05:08 PM

Brad is absolutely correct - technically Grassfed, at least as a Marketing claim, legally has to mean that the animal only consumed grass and/or forage for it's entire life (with the exception of when it consumed milk as a calf/lamb/kid/[insert other small ruminant animal name here]). This is a USDA Marketing Claim and cannot be legally used in selling meat without complying with those rules. The American Grassfed Association takes this a step further and certifies producers whose animals comply with three criteria:

• Their animals were fed a lifetime diet of 100% forage • Their animals were raised on pasture, not in confinement • Their animals were never treated with hormones or antibiotics

If you are looking for grassfed meat directly from a farm - whether it be beef or other meat, you can find it at www.homegrowncow.com/?paleohacks. Check the American Grassfed Association checkbox or the Grass-fed check box to find meat, or farms that raise that type of meat near you. You can also contact Home Grown Cow and request evidence that the claims of any of their farms are true, or request a farm visit. The choices also extend beyond grass-fed, and include criteria such as pasture-raised, no added hormones, no antibiotics and so on.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 06, 2012
at 06:45 AM

100% grass-fed would lead to a lot of cows dying in the winter. Unfortunately, "grass-fed" cows are usually grass-fed up until and after winter, though there is no way to avoid the fact that they must maintain a supplemental diet in the winter in order to live.

It would be animal cruelty to starve the cow, to let it die as there is little pasture to be fed upon during these times.

D7854f42e1c1d92f22b3903cd5d4a438

(218)

on November 06, 2012
at 12:49 PM

The farm I get my beef from feeds their cows hay during the winter which is just dried grass.

366c23d69eadce094a2b22299c58a424

(2988)

on November 06, 2012
at 04:09 PM

TheArcaneOne is correct. It is difficult to keep dairy cows producing without supplementing grains in the winter, but cows grown for meat do not need to be fed supplemental grains.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 06, 2012
at 09:23 PM

I should have gotten the +4 wtf

0
E791387b2829c660292308092dc3ca9b

(831)

on November 06, 2012
at 04:37 AM

Whole Foods sells both 100% grassfed and beef that has been fed grain. If it says grassfed that means 100% grass and no grain. Their Bison is also 100% grassfed and it's price is usually the same or even a bit less than their beef so I just buy Bison.

C0237fd9e277fcef496d538beda1f35b

(287)

on November 09, 2012
at 01:32 AM

I can actually buy the bison meat at our Krogers. They don't sell grass-fed beef though.

E791387b2829c660292308092dc3ca9b

(831)

on November 12, 2012
at 05:35 PM

Laura's Lean would be the best thing at Kroger's. They do feed some grain but the cattle are left on pasture and not feedlotted.

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