1

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I can't stand beef, what to do?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 20, 2011 at 8:40 PM

For some time I've been having trouble with eating beef. Low-fat, high-fat, any cut, it doesn't matter. The smell makes me nauseous and I really dislike the taste. I've been cooking broth using bones from beef, but it smells awful too.

However, I don't have any problems eating pork or chicken, or cooking broth from the bones.

This is becoming a problem because so many paleo advocates advise to favor ruminants instead of pork and chicken. Some opinion I read was that poultry fat should not be used at all.

And, what worse, there isn't really any pastured pork or chicken available where I live. Even when organic, they're fed grains, and some even abused with rapeseed oil.

This is not a matter of accustomization. During my days of grain and sugar eating, I preferred beef. The closer I get to paleo style eating, the less I like beef.

So what to do? I'm not sure I should force myself into eating beef. That wouldn't last far anyhow. So should I stop eating meat altogether and eat eggs for protein and get my fats from butter? Though that would get kind of boring too, eventually.

Thanks in advance for anyone taking the time to answer!

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on February 21, 2011
at 02:45 PM

I agree with the tone, but I do understand the point. I eat a lot of things I don't love because I know they are good for me. Usually, I get used to them. Some of them I learn to love like blueberries and sweet potatoes!

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on February 21, 2011
at 02:44 PM

Yeah, I keep wanting to like lamb and try it every month or so, but I just *don't*. It's the smell and the texture. I'll keep trying though.

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on February 21, 2011
at 02:40 PM

Wow. That's helpful, I'm sure.

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on February 21, 2011
at 05:16 AM

How is your zinc levels? My mother was a medical journal proofreader when I was growing up, and always insisted that I needed more zinc if I didn't feel like eating meat (I was always a carbaholic though, so I have no idea if she was right or not). You could also try strong flavored sauces, like Fra Diavolo or a nice spicy curry so that the beef is more there for texture than for flavor.

04293f705870e1837b8670d3c1cd5f67

(2261)

on February 20, 2011
at 10:31 PM

Did you mean eatwild.com? Listing by state. Everything you wanted to know about grass fed too.

E28616db1b59c2ab90d2d5596dfd019b

(10)

on February 20, 2011
at 08:59 PM

Thanks for the answers. Lamb is not that easily available, or if it is, it's probably some low-fat cut and/or frozen. Or shipped from the other side of the globe.

82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 20, 2011
at 08:46 PM

Yep, lamb would be good too.

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 20, 2011
at 08:42 PM

What about lamb?

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10 Answers

3
82166cc32b6cf26de33b69f58fb583b1

on February 21, 2011
at 08:03 AM

I don't have any problems eating pork or chicken... should I stop eating meat altogether and eat eggs for protein and get my fats from butter?

Before we can talk about solutions to your problem, we have to identify the problem.

The main problem is the ratio of omega-3 and omega-6 fats. The ratio is better in grassfed animals than grainfed, and better in beef and lamb than other meats.

Can you get a good ratio of omega-3 and omega-6 fats without eating grassfed ruminant meat? Sure! In fact there are several ways you can accomplish this. Here are your choices:

  1. Eat grainfed pork (it's much better in this respect than chicken) and compensate for its low omega-3 levels by adding oily fish (salmon, herring, mackeral, sardines, etc.) to your diet. In my opinion, pork plus oily fish is your best single choice.

  2. Eat grainfed pork and compensate by adding supplements (fish oil or krill oil). Personally, I wouldn't do this because polyunsaturated fat in supplements is too likely to be oxidized or contaminated by solvents.

  3. Eat a lot of omega-3 enhanced eggs. I think it's a good idea to eat some eggs. But if you rely on them for all your protein, you'll be eating more eggs than any of our paleolithic ancestors did. Back in paleolithic times, eggs were a seasonal treat, not something that was available in unlimited quantities every day of the year. Maybe it's healthy to eat huge numbers, but maybe it's not -- we don't know. Since we don't know, I fall back on the rule, "Paleolithic is probably safe, neolithic maybe not." Eating moderate numbers of eggs is paleolithic; a dozen per day for months at a time is not.

  4. You ask specifically about adding butter to eggs to get more fat. Eggs all by themselves are 63% fat by energy. This is close to the amount that people usually like to eat so there might not be much need to add a lot of fat to an egg-based diet, although if you wanted to add more, that would be perfectly healthy. It should be noted that grassfed butter has a good omega ratio, but it doesn't have enough omega-3 to compensate for other foods (like grainfed meat) that have bad ratios. Oily fish and supplements can compensate; butter cannot. Personally, I don't eat butter (or any dairy) because I think there is a good chance that cow's milk (and milk generally) contains hormones and other growth regulating substances that have harmful effects in the adult human body. I can't point to any research that proves this, but not everything about milk has been studied. Whenever we don't know something for sure, I fall back on the simple rule, "Paleolithic foods are probably safe, neolithic foods may not be safe." Butter (and all dairy) is neolithic.

So far in my answer I've been assuming that you want to get a lot of calories from meat fat. But David Moss brings up another strategy. You could avoid meat fat by eating the leanest meat possible. In the United States, the leanest commercial meat is pork tenderloin. Pork tenderloin is less than 3% fat by weight. You would still need to supplement with omega-3 (oily fish or extracted oil) but you wouldn't need to supplement as much.

If you avoid meat fat, you'll run into a new problem. You'll need to replace the lost calories from meat fat with some other source of calories. There are several ways to do that.

  1. Add tubers to your diet. Potatoes, sweet potatoes, tapioca, taro, etc. This is perfectly paleolithic. There is a widespread belief in this forum that paleolithic means low-carb. This isn't true. Many of our paleolithic ancestors, and many people in hunter-gatherer societies in recent times, ate large amounts of starch.

  2. Add saturated plant fat to the diet in place of animal fat. You have two choices: coconut oil or palm kernel oil. Personally, I wouldn't be too keen on doing this. I don't like the idea of artificially extracted fats. I prefer to eat whole foods.

  3. Add grassfed butter. I already covered this above.

After thinking it through, here's what I'd do myself. I'd eat grainfed pork as my main meat, but limit the amount. I'd also eat some omega-3 eggs, but not a huge number. I'd eat oily fish pretty often. I'd get some of my calories -- a few hundred a day -- from tubers.

In other words, I'd pick a combination of all the paleolithic choices listed above.

1
7df8f3cc7f1475c3ecbbd4a4feb87d04

(514)

on February 21, 2011
at 01:59 AM

There's always fish - you could get most of your protein & other nutrients from salmon, sardines, shrimp, oysters, and even get more adventurous if you have a nice sushi spot where you live.

1
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on February 21, 2011
at 01:36 AM

Keep eating pork and chicken. There's nothing saying you must eat beef you know... Curries, marinades, herbs and spices to change things up.

1
C4134ed417dbc0a6b79ab2cee32632d3

(1801)

on February 20, 2011
at 09:17 PM

Funny, I went through a phase when I first started to LC that I went off beef. It's back in favour with my taste buds though! What I did find was that although I'd gone off the taste of the beef meat, I could eat the fat from the edge of the cut and it was nice, but the muscle meat was yack! Worth a try?

I'm in the UK and we don't have Bison here, so I can't say what the flavour is like. But, I assume it's a red meat? Again, Lamb - from what I've read, it sounds like the decent lamb is imported from Australia/New Zealand. Lamb is known as a "fatty" meat - hence it's yummy taste!

Or, how about Venison? If there's nothing local, are you able to source from an online farmer/producer who will deliver?

1
E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 20, 2011
at 09:01 PM

What about non-beef red meats like lamb, which are substantially better than pork or chicken for fatty acid profiles?

Alternatively, I don't think pork would be a disaster, so long as you go for very lean cuts and get the rest of your fats from some more suitable source. It doesn't matter if 9% of the fat from the meat you're eating is omega 6, if your meat contains very little fat. Personally I find butter tastes better (and is more nutritious) than the fats from meats anyway, especially pork fat (I suspect I'm in a minority here).

I wouldn't advise just eating lean chicken, since it's relatively devoid of nutrients (not that fatty chicken is significantly preferable). If you're eating lean chicken plus a lot of fat, then it'll be a struggle to get enough nutrients. It might be viable if you're literally just eating chicken for a moderate amount of protein and get the rest of your nutrients from assorted plants. I would say that eggs fall into the same category. If you're just eating the whites for protein then you're not getting any substantial micronutition and if you're eating large amounts of yolks, then you'd get more omega 6 than you'd be getting from pork anyway. Of course, if you want to eat a variety of offal instead of beef, then you'll be fine for nutrients and lean sources of protein!

0
072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on February 21, 2011
at 03:00 AM

Grass-fed ground beef is my go-to meat of choice, but for you, I would recommend rotating your preferred lean meats (wild seafood, pork and chicken). Any of them with a big mound of quacamole on top is a winner, and the rotation and variety will help you get the nutrients you need.

Since you ate beef previously, you might just give it a rest for awhile and then try it again at a meal with a very nice cut and see what you think. Might not work. Then again, it might.

0
A089b683ee0498f2b21b7edfa300e405

on February 21, 2011
at 02:59 AM

You could try goat - A fine tasting ruminant meat. Easily available at asian stores, fresh and generally grass fed.

0
Medium avatar

on February 21, 2011
at 01:19 AM

If this fellow doesn't like the smell of beef, then lamb is really going to put him off. I know plenty of people who love beef but find lamb to be too strong. Personally, I don't eat beef for non-taste reasons and eat fairly substantial portions of lamb daily. My GF will never touch it, though.

It seems like eating a bunch of coconut and macadamia nuts would be better than eating a lot of conventionally-produced chicken or pork, to be honest.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on February 21, 2011
at 02:44 PM

Yeah, I keep wanting to like lamb and try it every month or so, but I just *don't*. It's the smell and the texture. I'll keep trying though.

0
65430e39d7e9e9322718d016fe668051

(2944)

on February 20, 2011
at 09:09 PM

Don't eat it if you don't like it. It's just a preference. Have you checked eatwild.org for local farms around your area that you could get chicken from? You could always order meat to be shipped to you, but personally I feel that goes against the whole paleo approach. However if you see Icelandic lamb, it's most likely grass-fed.

04293f705870e1837b8670d3c1cd5f67

(2261)

on February 20, 2011
at 10:31 PM

Did you mean eatwild.com? Listing by state. Everything you wanted to know about grass fed too.

-2
08ce57b1bbb3bda8e384234389c36d94

on February 21, 2011
at 02:34 PM

Frankly I could care less that you don't like beef. Eat it anyway, it's good for you!

In years past millions upon millions of kids were forced by their mothers to swallow down copious amounts of cod liver oil. Sure, they hated it but so what? It was far superior to contracting rickets.

In short my advise to you is stop being such a wuss.

7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

(18701)

on February 21, 2011
at 02:45 PM

I agree with the tone, but I do understand the point. I eat a lot of things I don't love because I know they are good for me. Usually, I get used to them. Some of them I learn to love like blueberries and sweet potatoes!

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on February 21, 2011
at 02:40 PM

Wow. That's helpful, I'm sure.

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