3

votes

How many toxins are in non-organic/grass fed beef products?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 20, 2011 at 6:45 PM

Obviously, grass fed beef is superior...but just HOW bad is the other stuff?

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 21, 2011
at 12:37 PM

Yeah, my wife made a regular pork butt in the crock pot last night. I felt kinda yucky after I had some.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 21, 2011
at 06:43 AM

Wash it carefully to remove whatever bath it was dipped in (Amonia? Chorine? or is that for chickens only) and soak it in a marinade - salt and citrus will kill off a lot of the nasties, but not all. Avoid expensive cuts of steak that might be glued together with meat glue. Bacteria is on the surface, searing it kills it. So rare steak is ok, rare hamburger is not since every grain as surface all around it. Slow cooker is a great way to go. Not sure if they still do it anymore, but they used to expose beef to Carbon-Monoxide to make it look red for a longer period of time.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 20, 2011
at 10:08 PM

The omega-ratio in grain-fed beef, while poor, isn't that bad because total omegas in beef is very low to begin with. In other words, you don't consume enough PUFAs in beef to be overly concerned with the ratio of O3 to O6.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 20, 2011
at 10:07 PM

Oh Nocebo effect... you're funny.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 20, 2011
at 09:54 PM

You could add mycotoxins from the grain feed to that list.

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on December 20, 2011
at 09:51 PM

Plus the pesticides they ingest.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on December 20, 2011
at 09:26 PM

Fructose is more 'toxic' than either grain fed or grass fed beef, just something to think about. Trenbolone Acetate is not found in domestic beef on your store shelves, imported beef is another story. Antibiotics Penicillin and Tetracycline's are not fed to cows unless they get a bacterial infection and are never slaughtered while taking them. Milk cows are again, another story altogether. The biggest problem w grain fed meet is the o3/o6 ratio.

C59f469d51da372100083ff164e8f943

on December 20, 2011
at 08:19 PM

That all doesn't seem HORRIBLE...except that the corn fed beef has corn in it...but really, I taste a huge difference, and I feel like shit after eating it. Maybe my body is getting more senstive to the toxic stuff.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 20, 2011
at 08:13 PM

What? Dude, where's the list to with that? And what does -23 mean? It removes toxins? Oh, you were just kidding... Never mind.

Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on December 20, 2011
at 07:53 PM

non-organic has 7 toxins, compared to -23 in grass-fed beef

C59f469d51da372100083ff164e8f943

on December 20, 2011
at 07:45 PM

LOL I'm not losing sleep over it. I can afford the grass fed, and I do buy it more often than not. I did cook some non-organic ribeyes the other day and felt immediately sick. Same thing for some Johnsonville sausage that I made. I was jsut curious about the amount of difference in toxins, etc.

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4 Answers

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2
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 20, 2011
at 08:59 PM

I worry most about bacterial contamination since I all my chronic health complaints disappeared completely in the 8 months I've been eating large quantities of supermarket beef. I avoid any beef I don't like the looks of, since my first 20 years of buying was before the use of antibiotics and growth hormones.

Although it's not labeled healthy, there's one market in my area that carries local produce and I noticed their beef/poultry looks just like the old days and also tastes better. They even have bags of pork rinds that are in large, irregular pieces rather than machine cut and have fabulous smell and taste compared to the tasteless big brand ones. Make sure you check out all smaller local markets because you never know when you'll stumble across a gem!

A lot of my supermarket beef goes in the slow-cooker. If I choose to slow-fry (setting 4 out of 9) I usually pull apart the lean pieces divided by fat. The fat gets rendered first to provide liquid fat for the pan and the pieces get seared around the edges and then slow-fried to medium.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on December 21, 2011
at 06:43 AM

Wash it carefully to remove whatever bath it was dipped in (Amonia? Chorine? or is that for chickens only) and soak it in a marinade - salt and citrus will kill off a lot of the nasties, but not all. Avoid expensive cuts of steak that might be glued together with meat glue. Bacteria is on the surface, searing it kills it. So rare steak is ok, rare hamburger is not since every grain as surface all around it. Slow cooker is a great way to go. Not sure if they still do it anymore, but they used to expose beef to Carbon-Monoxide to make it look red for a longer period of time.

5
6cca02352c216b4ca8325fda7d83832c

(1042)

on December 20, 2011
at 09:32 PM

I asked a similar question recently about CAFO beef liver vs. grassfed beef liver, and the few answers I received confirmed my perception that very few people in the Paleo community have knowledge about toxin levels in grassfed or CAFO beef products: http://paleohacks.com/questions/84026/how-to-prepare-cafo-beef-chicken-liver-if-it-has-significant-toxin-levels#axzz1h6ywz8D3

The best article I read about the subject (although it was about beef liver specifically, the information could easily be extrapolated to any beef cut) was this: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/does-the-liver-store-toxins/#axzz1gjYLpVTd

The statement of most interest to me in the above article: "Livestock, even CAFO livestock, just aren???t exposed to toxic levels of heavy metals." I am more concerned about the hormones and antibiotics in CAFO beef products than the toxins, unless you classify the hormones and antibiotics given to CAFO cows as toxins, because they have toxic effects on our bodies. My opinion is that as long as CAFO beef products are a cheat and not a staple in your diet you should have nothing to worry about - i.e. follow the 80/20 rule advocated by Kresser and Sisson among other respectable Paleo experts.

3
07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on December 20, 2011
at 07:43 PM

Not bad enough to lose sleep over if that's the best you can do.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 20, 2011
at 10:07 PM

Oh Nocebo effect... you're funny.

C59f469d51da372100083ff164e8f943

on December 20, 2011
at 07:45 PM

LOL I'm not losing sleep over it. I can afford the grass fed, and I do buy it more often than not. I did cook some non-organic ribeyes the other day and felt immediately sick. Same thing for some Johnsonville sausage that I made. I was jsut curious about the amount of difference in toxins, etc.

1
A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 20, 2011
at 08:15 PM

Just the growth hormones and antibiotics. And the less favorable n6/n3 ratio. And if they are badly treated when killed, they could have other hormones elevated (cortisol, epinephrine, etc).

That's all I can think of atm.

Edit.

I suppose E coli tends to be more of a problem in regular (grain fed) beef.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on December 20, 2011
at 09:54 PM

You could add mycotoxins from the grain feed to that list.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 21, 2011
at 12:37 PM

Yeah, my wife made a regular pork butt in the crock pot last night. I felt kinda yucky after I had some.

88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

(803)

on December 20, 2011
at 09:51 PM

Plus the pesticides they ingest.

C59f469d51da372100083ff164e8f943

on December 20, 2011
at 08:19 PM

That all doesn't seem HORRIBLE...except that the corn fed beef has corn in it...but really, I taste a huge difference, and I feel like shit after eating it. Maybe my body is getting more senstive to the toxic stuff.

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