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Help me eat Beef..

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 31, 2010 at 9:33 PM

I used to be a vegetarian few years back. Then slowly started with chicken, fish and turkey. But most of the time I just eat turkey/chicken and so I am not able to get enough fat. Of course I eat guac etc but I would prefer animal fat. So I want to eat beef. Could anybody tell me which cut I should buy and post some very tasty foolproof recipe (so that I stick to it better)? By the way I have tried ground beef and found it was good, but don't want to be eating the same thing daily.

884de41c8ab17d8f970311f63c8f5d53

(0)

on August 23, 2011
at 05:24 PM

If you're not a die-hard locavore, I have found some 100% grass-fed Wagyu that ships from Florida: http://www.pastureprimewagyu.com./

10034c23f65addc5735eb02a32448223

(361)

on November 08, 2010
at 12:46 AM

I did http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yX1Q3x9Cs4 and it turned out AWESOME!

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 01, 2010
at 06:58 PM

Ground beef can be made into lots of stuff - burgers, chili, meatza, meatloaf, meat sauce...

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 01, 2010
at 06:56 PM

We like strip steaks over ribeyes - just throw 'em on the grill. Burgers on the grill are easy and a favorite.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 01, 2010
at 01:33 AM

If you liked ground beef, you should like lots of other cuts as well that IMO taste better than ground beef.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 01, 2010
at 01:31 AM

Amen to ribeye.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 31, 2010
at 10:51 PM

i second the recommendation on ribeyes in general. To be honest im still not a big beef fan, but ribeyes are absolutely terrific. Best kind and amount of fat on those i find.

61852721b5ff3613f56f043fe890a679

(1172)

on October 31, 2010
at 10:51 PM

Fiesta Brisket Rub: not paleo. Doesn't even sound like something I'd recommend to non-paleo friends. Ingredients: Salt, Spices, Rice Flour, Paprika, Sugar, Monosodium Glutamate, Onion, Garlic, Calcium Stearate (Free-Flow Agent), Tenderizer (Proteolytic Enzyme derived from Aspergillus Flavus Oryaze and from Papaya), TBHQ and Citric Acid.

4e71477b1b79dfbe3aa9d6fcbc6aa859

on October 31, 2010
at 10:46 PM

Oops I forgot the links to the tools, here they are: You can find these tools for a lot less money in stores than you can online. Jaccard: http://www.americangrassfedbeef.com/jaccard-meat-tenderizer.asp Round Tenderizing Tool: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00004UE7Y/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_3?ie=UTF8&cloe_id=a9271b5b-6f93-4b54-ac9d-0198bdb4a7c1&attrMsgId=LPWidget-A1&pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B000066OJD&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0X4MQRG9BTEKNJMTK586

61852721b5ff3613f56f043fe890a679

(1172)

on October 31, 2010
at 10:41 PM

Yes. I do the exact same thing. Sirloins, ribeyes, t-bones, strip steaks, tri-tips, all of them, I cook exactly the same. 1. bring the meat to room temperature and pat it dry 2. liberally salt and pepper it 3. make a cast-iron skillet very hot. put in the meat. 4. cook it for just a few minutes - only until it stops sticking to the pan. as soon as it releases, flip it. 5. repeat on the second side. 6. remove it from the heat, put it on a plate, tent it with foil or an upturned bowl, and let it sit for ten minutes. enjoy.

10034c23f65addc5735eb02a32448223

(361)

on October 31, 2010
at 10:01 PM

Is it really that simple!!

  • 10034c23f65addc5735eb02a32448223

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4 Answers

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3
29ebbe9f78bc4b4aa959abf9d1431348

on October 31, 2010
at 09:48 PM

Ribeye and t-bones. Cast iron skillet. SaLt and pepper. I was a vegan for more than 12 years. Paleo and healthy for five years now. Noah

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 01, 2010
at 01:31 AM

Amen to ribeye.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 31, 2010
at 10:51 PM

i second the recommendation on ribeyes in general. To be honest im still not a big beef fan, but ribeyes are absolutely terrific. Best kind and amount of fat on those i find.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 01, 2010
at 06:56 PM

We like strip steaks over ribeyes - just throw 'em on the grill. Burgers on the grill are easy and a favorite.

10034c23f65addc5735eb02a32448223

(361)

on November 08, 2010
at 12:46 AM

I did http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3yX1Q3x9Cs4 and it turned out AWESOME!

10034c23f65addc5735eb02a32448223

(361)

on October 31, 2010
at 10:01 PM

Is it really that simple!!

61852721b5ff3613f56f043fe890a679

(1172)

on October 31, 2010
at 10:41 PM

Yes. I do the exact same thing. Sirloins, ribeyes, t-bones, strip steaks, tri-tips, all of them, I cook exactly the same. 1. bring the meat to room temperature and pat it dry 2. liberally salt and pepper it 3. make a cast-iron skillet very hot. put in the meat. 4. cook it for just a few minutes - only until it stops sticking to the pan. as soon as it releases, flip it. 5. repeat on the second side. 6. remove it from the heat, put it on a plate, tent it with foil or an upturned bowl, and let it sit for ten minutes. enjoy.

2
Ecef210e24a493f64c76d9c5a4ae7c88

on October 31, 2010
at 09:52 PM

You've come to the right man :)

First and foremost, stick to grass-finished beef. Not all grass-fed beef is 100% grass fed; they often "finish" the cattle on grain to up the fat content.

According to the author of Steak (the book, and I'm not joking), the best cut is the strip loin. This author is OK with grain-finishing for the added flavor, but he's not paleo at all, just a flavor expert. He mentioned the tenderloin, rib eye, and porterhouse as good choices.

Any real cook knows that good steak should go unvarnished. Maybe a little lemon pepper, but a good cut of beef will blow your mind on it's own if you find one. Try local farmer's markets for Angus, Devon, or Hereford breeds. Wagyu is the best, but impossible to find grass fed.

Grilling is the way to go most of the time, but roasting can work well for large cuts. Grilling should be relatively quick, just to brown the outside and get those sexy grill lines. Don't cook it all the way through unless you're queasy with red meat. Roasting should be high heat for 15-30 minutes, then low heat until it's done (depends on type/size of cut, etc.).

Check out this podcast for more info: http://www.thelivinlowcarbshow.com/shownotes/2415/mark-schatzker-makes-the-perfect-steak-episode-402/

884de41c8ab17d8f970311f63c8f5d53

(0)

on August 23, 2011
at 05:24 PM

If you're not a die-hard locavore, I have found some 100% grass-fed Wagyu that ships from Florida: http://www.pastureprimewagyu.com./

0
4e71477b1b79dfbe3aa9d6fcbc6aa859

on October 31, 2010
at 10:43 PM

I will swear by this recipe for any steak, any cut, tenderize each side of the meat with a tenderizing tool, Jaccard or the round type of tenderizer is great (see links for these tools below.) Do Not use a meat mallet. I use a tenderizer religiously on both sides of the meat for every steak & every cut of meat I prepare. Then I rub down the steak with Olive oil, then a light dusting of Fiesta brand brisket rub on both sides & cracked pepper. NO SALT. That's it. Put it on a hot grill for about 3-5 minutes per side for med rare, 5-7 for medium (this is for thick cut steaks of at least 1 inch.) After that, in my opinion a steak is ruined if you cook it any longer than that.

Rump Roast I would get your dutch oven or good roasting pot with a lid that you plan to roast it in. Preheat the oven to 375. Get a burner on the stove top ready for the pot with a medium-high heat, if you have gas usually an 8 is good here. You will put just enough olive oil in the bottom of the pan to coat it & get it hot. I take the roast & will cut slits all over it & put slivers of garlic in it. Then pepper & brisket rub the entire outside. Then put the roast into the oiled pot to sear it on each side until it looks like a good steak sear. When you're done with that cover the roast with water, make sure the water covers the roast shake a little more brisket rub into the water & a little more pepper. Put it in the oven. You can also add some veggies here. I do carrots, parsnips, baby sweet potatoes & onions. You can even do brussels sprouts. Roast for about 2 hours until your roast is about 155-160. When it hits this temp take it out & let it rest for 15 minutes.

61852721b5ff3613f56f043fe890a679

(1172)

on October 31, 2010
at 10:51 PM

Fiesta Brisket Rub: not paleo. Doesn't even sound like something I'd recommend to non-paleo friends. Ingredients: Salt, Spices, Rice Flour, Paprika, Sugar, Monosodium Glutamate, Onion, Garlic, Calcium Stearate (Free-Flow Agent), Tenderizer (Proteolytic Enzyme derived from Aspergillus Flavus Oryaze and from Papaya), TBHQ and Citric Acid.

4e71477b1b79dfbe3aa9d6fcbc6aa859

on October 31, 2010
at 10:46 PM

Oops I forgot the links to the tools, here they are: You can find these tools for a lot less money in stores than you can online. Jaccard: http://www.americangrassfedbeef.com/jaccard-meat-tenderizer.asp Round Tenderizing Tool: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00004UE7Y/ref=pd_lpo_k2_dp_sr_3?ie=UTF8&cloe_id=a9271b5b-6f93-4b54-ac9d-0198bdb4a7c1&attrMsgId=LPWidget-A1&pf_rd_p=486539851&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B000066OJD&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0X4MQRG9BTEKNJMTK586

0
1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on October 31, 2010
at 09:48 PM

Buy a bottom round roast or other oven roast (ask the butcher, they love questions around here) take it home. Also get some stew meat.

Cut an onion, line the bottom of a crock pot with the slices. Rub the roast with salt, paprika, garlic and dry mustard.

Put roast on top of onion and turn it on low.

Leave it there for 3 to 4 hours or so (or until a meat timer with an alarm, which you should get, hits 125 to 130)

Take out, let it sit for a while and then slice with a serrated knife.

Add red wine or balsamic vinegar to the stuff left in the crock pot (about a cup) and about an equal amount of water. Add stew meat cook for a while (3 hours or so). You can toss in some carrots and celery at the beginning, or some frozen mushrooms. Some shredded cabbage is good in the last half hour, but be careful with slow cooking cruxiferious veggies cause they can give off sulfur compounds that taste nasty if cooked too long.

Vola, two easy beef dishes that can be cooked in a lazy afternoon and the stew freezes pretty well.

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