2

votes

Grassfed beef "gelatin" in the crock pot

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 01, 2010 at 6:16 PM

I notice when I use a crock pot to make a grass-fed roast (usually a chuck roast), after I put the roast and the liquid in the fridge, the liquid forms a layer of white fat, but also turns into a gelatin-like substance. Just curious if anyone knows what causes this. Is it connective tissue that is rendered during the cooking process? And why does it not happen, or at least is not as pronounced in conventional beef?

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on April 14, 2011
at 02:10 PM

I just cooked several LARGE Marrow Bones in the crock pot for 36hours... not only does my house smell amazing, but I think im now spoiled against standard steaks. So Frickin good. Used a little vinegar, have a HUGE Jar of Gelatin in the fridge to cook with/add to grill steaks/gravy.

35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on April 13, 2011
at 07:19 PM

Hannah, I've made chicken stock with both factory farmed birds and pastured birds, there is a huge difference. The stock from the pastured birds sets up like jello!

C8521a858edd480815a55f683afff86a

(2065)

on July 02, 2010
at 05:16 PM

I have never made chicken stock from non-pastured chicken, but I have read that factory chickens b/c they don't move around enough, don't produce the same amount of connective tissue that makes a stock gel up. Obviously you have seen otherwise, that's interesting. I work at a restaurant and noticed that our chicken stock based soups are not thick and gelled when they come out of the cooler. At home my stock can not even remotely be considered liquid after they have been cooled, I have to scoop it out of the bowl with a cup!

  • 08f65e31fe63fa8c91edcdf8ece35607

    asked by

    (220)
  • Views
    4.2K
  • Last Activity
    1279D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

4 Answers

3
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on July 02, 2010
at 05:14 PM

In a cooking class, they said that if you add vinegar (acidic) to this dish before cooking, you will get more of the gelatinous stuff. Highly prized ingredient in cooking.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on April 14, 2011
at 02:10 PM

I just cooked several LARGE Marrow Bones in the crock pot for 36hours... not only does my house smell amazing, but I think im now spoiled against standard steaks. So Frickin good. Used a little vinegar, have a HUGE Jar of Gelatin in the fridge to cook with/add to grill steaks/gravy.

3
4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on July 01, 2010
at 06:35 PM

Gelatin is basically rendered collagen. Collagen occurs in all tissues in the body, including bones and connective tissue. I personally have never noticed a difference in the amount of gelatin produced by creating stock from grass-fed and grain-fed animals. I used to make chicken stock from every chicken I ate, and they created plenty of getalin despite being 99 cent/lb roasters from the grocery store. Maybe someone with more knowledge of animal physiology can contradict me, but I don't think there's any significant difference in the amount of collagen between grain and grass fed animals.

When you render the animal, collagen is liberated from the various places it has been held in the body. The rendering process helps purify the now liberated collagen and breaks the connections which had previously existed between collagen molecules. When you cool the resulting liquid in water, you get a gel. Voila, gelatin!

C8521a858edd480815a55f683afff86a

(2065)

on July 02, 2010
at 05:16 PM

I have never made chicken stock from non-pastured chicken, but I have read that factory chickens b/c they don't move around enough, don't produce the same amount of connective tissue that makes a stock gel up. Obviously you have seen otherwise, that's interesting. I work at a restaurant and noticed that our chicken stock based soups are not thick and gelled when they come out of the cooler. At home my stock can not even remotely be considered liquid after they have been cooled, I have to scoop it out of the bowl with a cup!

35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on April 13, 2011
at 07:19 PM

Hannah, I've made chicken stock with both factory farmed birds and pastured birds, there is a huge difference. The stock from the pastured birds sets up like jello!

2
2b8c327d1296a96ad64cdadc7dffa72d

on July 01, 2010
at 06:36 PM

are you cooking with bone, or without?

a well-marbled "tough" cut will break down, and some of that congealed mass you see is connective tissue, some is actually gelatin from the bone if you've cooked it long enough for portions to break down. Remember that the bone is cut, so the marrow is exposed, and it will cook out/down into whatever gravy goodness you're making!

1
A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

on July 02, 2010
at 02:25 AM

It should happen no matter if the meat was grass-fed or not... I eat regular meat as for now (for many different reasons), and it's always the result... the more bones and joints/cartilage you cook, the better gelatin it produces.

It can actually be taken while still hot, and poured over a choice of cut veggies, hard boiled eggs etc. in a cup, and then later eaten cold with some vinegar poured over. YUM. But for that it needs to be made of a lot of bones, often (pig) legs or so. still remember from childhood... :)

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!