1

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factory farmed meat. Is beef better than chicken and eggs?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 31, 2012 at 3:45 PM

I ask this based solely on the fact that beef actually still tastes like beef while eggs have a very weak flavor and chicken has almost no flavor.

Are they all equally as bad? or should I be eating more beef?

I'm in debt right now so I don't really worry about grass fed.

3a9d5dde5212ccd34b860bb6ed07bbef

(1782)

on August 31, 2012
at 07:20 PM

Probably not great, but there's only about 1 gram of fat per 6oz breast.

Adb6852b4f2f42904da67708ffcd59f5

(496)

on August 31, 2012
at 06:51 PM

what is the o3 to o6 ratio of lean chicken breasts?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 31, 2012
at 05:08 PM

Excellent point!

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on August 31, 2012
at 04:52 PM

He can still get fats through avocados, coconut oil, olive oil, etc., and eat lean cuts of CAFO meats.

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6 Answers

6
3a9d5dde5212ccd34b860bb6ed07bbef

on August 31, 2012
at 03:55 PM

I think it is always a wise choice to opt for very lean cuts of meat (chicken breasts, flank steaks, tilapia) when wild/free range/grass fed are not options. This is because meat has a bad habit of accumulating fat soluble toxins.

3a9d5dde5212ccd34b860bb6ed07bbef

(1782)

on August 31, 2012
at 07:20 PM

Probably not great, but there's only about 1 gram of fat per 6oz breast.

Adb6852b4f2f42904da67708ffcd59f5

(496)

on August 31, 2012
at 06:51 PM

what is the o3 to o6 ratio of lean chicken breasts?

3
E791387b2829c660292308092dc3ca9b

(831)

on August 31, 2012
at 06:16 PM

Chickens are not vastly different from pastured to raised in a chicken house. They both use a frankenchicken breed that is butchered at 6-8 weeks. Both get grain, one just gets more. The other one gets a bit of bugs and gass but because these chicks are made to gain weight fast they are fat and lazy and they do very little foraging. So unless you can find a farm raising something other than Cornish X you are wasting your money on the free range bird.

Free range eggs are well worth the extra cost. Get them at your local Farmer's market or even better fresh from the farm. Fresh from the hen eggs stay good for 4-6 weeks so you can load up on them.

On the beef your cheapest choice will always be to buy it in bulk. You definitely want it grass fed just because of the hormones and the Omega 3 increase. Buying a quarter of a cow is pricey but saves you money in the long run and you get a variety of cuts for a much better price per pound. Your other option is to find a regular grocery that sells grass fed beef and catch it when it is marked down. Develop a relationship with the butcher there and he will let you know when he marks stuff down. I have had good success at Krogers catching all of their organic/grass fed stuff marked down.

2
68294383ced9a0eafc16133aa80d1905

(5795)

on September 01, 2012
at 01:20 AM

I think the points about fattier meats are well-said and well-established. Consuming toxic fat from sick animals isn't good. However, I'll speak, generally speaking about lean poultry (skinless chicken breast and egg whites, which contain almost zero fat).

Outside of essential aminos and protein, you get very little from these foods. They are satiating and great additions to a diet, but in a way, even the poorly-raised versions aren't that harmful simply because they don't contain much. I'm very conscious of food quality and sourcing, but I won't lie, I go through conventional egg whites and chicken all the time. It's so lean that you're basically eating it for pure protein. Cook it in healthy oils (I love dipping chicken in coconut oil) and you get a great-tasting combo of protein and fat.

It's no substitute for high-quality eggs or a juicy chicken thigh w/skin, but it's a nice alternative.

2
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 31, 2012
at 04:29 PM

Don't let perfect be the enemy of good enough.

Eat as well as you can. Poultry would likely be the best because they cannot use steroids or hormones on chickens... And wild poultry is still pretty high to O6, so you aren't losing anything there. Still you need some fat, so you cannot focus only on lean cuts.

Also check out farmers markets. I find great deals on big cuts of beef from grass fed cows that no one else wants to buy. Butcher yourself and save the dough.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 31, 2012
at 05:08 PM

Excellent point!

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on August 31, 2012
at 04:52 PM

He can still get fats through avocados, coconut oil, olive oil, etc., and eat lean cuts of CAFO meats.

0
45ace03a0eff1219943d746cfb1c4197

(3661)

on September 01, 2012
at 11:53 AM

I am more comfortable, personally, with leaner beef cuts than with either eggs or chicken when conventionally raised is all that's available.

I will not buy chicken at all. I'd limit eggs but probably not eliminate them. I would also be more inclined to avoid ground beef unless I knew the source.

I agree with CD, as well. Perfect can easily become the enemy of good. Starving and stressing are not desirable options.

0
Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on September 01, 2012
at 03:58 AM

There is no actual way to quantify this. One could try epidemiology, but, well, I would not try that, heh.

Beef has far more carnitine, taurine, and carnosine than chicken does. I'm not sure about creatine, but I think that beef is more nutritious in general.

I don't advocate the consumption of feedlot beef, I just distribute facts and let people make up their own minds.

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