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Can I store beef dripping in my deep fat fryer?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 20, 2012 at 9:43 PM

Can I store beef dripping in my new deep fat fryer or will it quickly go off at room temperature. I suppose I could put the whole machine into one of my fridges when it cools down. Ideally I'd like to store the fat at room temperature for two or three weeks until the fat is looking a bit dirty.

Also the instructions said not to mix fats, I've made a 75% beef dripping / 25% virgin coconut oil mix. Why would that be a problem?

Adb249ff0b1447d86ed308d0265e2b86

(571)

on October 22, 2012
at 01:55 PM

It's just the standard Britannia brand they sell in the supermarkets. I'm happy with the flavor. I've now established, from finding lab test results, that beef dripping takes longer to go rancid than any other commonly used fat. Since posting my question my mum, aged 70, told me in her day they used to leave lard in the chip pan for weeks, it doesn't really go off.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on October 21, 2012
at 07:38 AM

I don't find that beef dripping has a strong flavour at all, and that of course makes it very versatile. I also find that it keeps very well - what was your source of the dripping? I buy mine from a butcher here in the UK and it is consistently of high quality.

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2 Answers

1
Ff1dbd6cecad1e69a8234fb2c2c5c5ed

(1409)

on October 21, 2012
at 06:36 AM

Fat which has been heated will go rancid more quickly and the higher the heat, the quicker the spoiling.

1
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on October 20, 2012
at 11:24 PM

I have not had good luck with keeping beef drippings, they seem to go rancid quickly, and in any event have a strong flavor and aren't very versatile. I am not 100% sure of the health qualities of beef drippings, but if they are actually going rancid, then they probably aren't good for you.

This might work better if the fat were trimmed from the beef and rendered slowly rather than coming off of a roast, but I find that duck and pork fat are a lot better than beef in terms of keeping the rendered fat for cooking with later.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on October 21, 2012
at 07:38 AM

I don't find that beef dripping has a strong flavour at all, and that of course makes it very versatile. I also find that it keeps very well - what was your source of the dripping? I buy mine from a butcher here in the UK and it is consistently of high quality.

Adb249ff0b1447d86ed308d0265e2b86

(571)

on October 22, 2012
at 01:55 PM

It's just the standard Britannia brand they sell in the supermarkets. I'm happy with the flavor. I've now established, from finding lab test results, that beef dripping takes longer to go rancid than any other commonly used fat. Since posting my question my mum, aged 70, told me in her day they used to leave lard in the chip pan for weeks, it doesn't really go off.

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