1

votes

BEEF Juice: what is it called

Answered on October 24, 2017
Created March 17, 2011 at 8:11 PM

I made som eground beef and decided to store the juices in a glass jar which I then refridgerated. Is there a generic label for this "BEEF JUICE"? I haven't found anything on the net. I would like to find out what nutritional properties it has and so include it in the diet as opposed to tossing it out. ANyone know any sources or what this substance is conventionally named?

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on March 18, 2011
at 04:48 PM

sorry but that sounds gross. beef juice shouldn't be left out like that. ghee in the pan, cool. coconut oil. sweet. beef juice. napes.

A6e2b231f69366ce825476c5a6dcfff6

(1967)

on March 18, 2011
at 06:32 AM

A didn't have a name for it, but I usually leave it in the pan and cook breakfast in it in the morning.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 18, 2011
at 01:40 AM

I heard from someone that it is called "beef drippings" in a different vernacular... that sounds about right. Anyone know what the nutritional profile is for the "drippings"?

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on March 17, 2011
at 11:16 PM

Can't get enough

D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

(4111)

on March 17, 2011
at 09:20 PM

I don't know, but of course anything commercially prepared will have a lot of sodium. I can't imagine that there was enough au jus produced to track the nutrition data? But if I were trying to do that then I would probably use beef stock as the closest choice available. Again being aware that nutrition tracking websites will probably use a commercially prepared beef stock as their example. It won't be exact since you weren't cooking bones down for stock, but might be close enough.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 17, 2011
at 08:51 PM

Thanks. I searched the net for "au jus" for nutritional info and there was a claim made by a random site that several hundred mg.s of sodium were contained in it. Where can I get nutritional info on this? Not much popped up.

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on March 17, 2011
at 08:43 PM

I think I'll have some.............

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 17, 2011
at 08:28 PM

Just a variety of protein in it I presume? But it sure tasted like a lot of fats were contained in it also as I consumed some experimentally.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 17, 2011
at 08:27 PM

I was frying it in a pan on lowish heat and the juices kept coming off. I suppose this wasn' the proper way to cook beef for maximal retention of nutrients/ killing off bacteria and hormones? So it is called BEEF JUICE after all. Thanks.

  • 77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

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7 Answers

4
D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

on March 17, 2011
at 08:36 PM

D67e7b481854b02110d5a5b21d6789b1

(4111)

on March 17, 2011
at 09:20 PM

I don't know, but of course anything commercially prepared will have a lot of sodium. I can't imagine that there was enough au jus produced to track the nutrition data? But if I were trying to do that then I would probably use beef stock as the closest choice available. Again being aware that nutrition tracking websites will probably use a commercially prepared beef stock as their example. It won't be exact since you weren't cooking bones down for stock, but might be close enough.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 17, 2011
at 08:51 PM

Thanks. I searched the net for "au jus" for nutritional info and there was a claim made by a random site that several hundred mg.s of sodium were contained in it. Where can I get nutritional info on this? Not much popped up.

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on March 17, 2011
at 08:43 PM

I think I'll have some.............

2
2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on March 17, 2011
at 09:45 PM

I call it beefy juice :) It's amazing reheated in a pan, let it glaze and caramelise and you'll have the loveliest beefiest beefy juice to go with your meal YUM!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 18, 2011
at 01:40 AM

I heard from someone that it is called "beef drippings" in a different vernacular... that sounds about right. Anyone know what the nutritional profile is for the "drippings"?

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on March 17, 2011
at 11:16 PM

Can't get enough

2
Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on March 17, 2011
at 08:14 PM

It's called beef juice.

Is there a reason why the juices didn't stay with the ground beef?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 17, 2011
at 08:27 PM

I was frying it in a pan on lowish heat and the juices kept coming off. I suppose this wasn' the proper way to cook beef for maximal retention of nutrients/ killing off bacteria and hormones? So it is called BEEF JUICE after all. Thanks.

2
E34fbfa1bca9ae970c9c7313bf9de9f8

(1436)

on March 17, 2011
at 08:13 PM

myoglobin + water = beef juice

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 17, 2011
at 08:28 PM

Just a variety of protein in it I presume? But it sure tasted like a lot of fats were contained in it also as I consumed some experimentally.

1
64242a1130eb51f4852f78beed38b3d5

(1343)

on March 19, 2011
at 03:16 AM

Salad Dressing.

0
D017b0d3cb3b235ee8dababb76e4af25

on October 24, 2017
at 06:38 PM

Beef Juice, not to be mistaken for milk!

0
2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on March 18, 2011
at 04:46 PM

Protein: High

Fat: Moderate

Saturated fat: High

Cholesterol: Moderate

Carbohydrates: None

Fiber: None

Sodium: Low

Major vitamin contribution: B vitamins

Major mineral contribution: Iron, phosphorus, zinc

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