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Dehydrating String Beans...

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 13, 2012 at 1:50 PM

I am trying to dehydrate string beans. Trader Joe's sells dehydrated crunchy string beans that I am trying to replicate without the canola oil and tapioca starch that theirs is prepared with. I would prefer olive oil.

I have a dehydrater at home, and I have attempted on two separate occasions to replicate the crunchy string beans sold at TJ's. Each attempt ended in failure. On one occasion I blanched the string beans before putting them in the dehydrator, and the other occasion I did not. Each time the string beans ended up shriveled and unedible.

Does anyone know the proper way to dehydrate the string beans in order to get them hard and crunchy?

All advice and suggestions are welcome.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on February 06, 2013
at 01:51 PM

Thank you Michael, I never thought of roasting them before! I will have to try that now.

F54a16e4caf4dc8da9ef1369f46a95cd

(591)

on December 26, 2012
at 02:10 AM

Not the vegetable chips. They are literally dehydrated whole string beans, I've seen them. No clue how to make them.

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4 Answers

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1
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 06, 2013
at 03:40 AM

The dehydrating alone is not making them crispy: the starch coating and frying is making them crispy.

Yes, the dehydrating helps. However, the moist-and-yet-crispy bite to them is undoubtedly from the frying.

Consider dehydrating them much, much less than before (before they get shriveled). You want to remove just enough moisture from them so the frying goes very quick and yet thoroughly. Definitely toss them with a bit of starch - tapioca or potato starch would be perfectly paleo for this admittedly faileo treat. Then, for the frying, light olive oil is probably your best paleo-ish bet - higher temp than EVOO and also much cheaper. Salt immediately after frying.

I kind of want to try this myself (I've never tried drying green beans in my Excalibur). I've done similarly textured veggies, so I firmly believe this is feasible at home.

Good luck! ... and let us know! :-)

1
Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

on February 06, 2013
at 01:24 PM

I can't say that I know of the beans at Trader Joe's, but can relate what I sometimes do with green/string beans: roast them. If they get spread in a single layer on a tray, doused with liberal amounts of fat, they will become crisp and charred (and hence be delicious :) ). Highish heat is preferable. These could well replicate the Trader Joe's stuff that you like, and the same principles could probably be applied in the context of a dehydrator (high heat oven is just quicker...). No breading required, just subject them to the heat long enough with the lubricant and they will crisp up very nicely...

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on February 06, 2013
at 01:51 PM

Thank you Michael, I never thought of roasting them before! I will have to try that now.

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

They probably have equipment for freeze drying, I'm not sure that can be done at home.

0
194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on December 25, 2012
at 10:35 PM

I think those snacks undergo a highly mechanized process. In fact, if there's flour or starch in the ingredients, chances are the vegetable matter is pulverized into a batter, then made into shapes like the original vegetable.

This might be helpful.

F54a16e4caf4dc8da9ef1369f46a95cd

(591)

on December 26, 2012
at 02:10 AM

Not the vegetable chips. They are literally dehydrated whole string beans, I've seen them. No clue how to make them.

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