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Chana dal: what is it, exactly?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 02, 2010 at 1:35 PM

I'm wondering what the lectin content of chana dal is. I believe it is the lowest glycemic food. It does require some soaking before cooking and can be seasoned many ways. I have about a pound of it in my pantry and am loathe to consign it to trash before I get an opinion on eating it. I love the stuff and used to eat it with rice or as a spread on Esekial Bread.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 06, 2010
at 03:35 PM

I eat that chocolate probably every other day! The wife just made chili with black beans this weekend and it was very tasty. I do avoid wheat at all cost - just a little makes me feel bad. And I'm a nazi about veg oils and most other "crap".

0e395acc856e3353f3f5892e6b09b0e7

(1227)

on December 04, 2010
at 02:42 PM

Thanks for the link. I like your easy peasy take on this. I'm not going to throw out my stash of chana dal, but not rush to eat it either. I'm still new enough to paleo that I'm not doing much eating outside of Panu's steps. I do eat Lindt's 85% chocolate every single day, however.

A089b683ee0498f2b21b7edfa300e405

(3895)

on December 03, 2010
at 09:52 AM

@Dex, Soaking is only half the story. Even in India, where legumes are used a lot - traditionally, they are soaked, then ground into paste and let ferment before steaming/frying etc. With the advent of the pressure cooker and shortage of time a lot of these traditional methods are now given a go by.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on December 02, 2010
at 06:15 PM

@Dex, yeah i like the last part of what you said: never understood the want to soak, and all. Before living this way, i spent years following the principles of weston price. While theyre spoton in many regards, the insistence on such processing of grains, nuts, and legumes, just to get them to be digestible always struck me as less-than-optimal. I understand in times of famine and all, but living today i just dont see the need.

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3 Answers

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A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 02, 2010
at 02:19 PM

From my searching, chana dal = black chickpeas. I found this link to a paper "Antinutritional factors of chickpea and pigeonpea and their removal by processing" and it is interesting.

http://www.springerlink.com/content/k245563854864006/

Click on the "Download PDF" to see the full text.

Their opinion is that the lectin content is not significant enough to worry about, but that the protease inhibitors and oligosacharrides are. The protease inhibitors can be minimized through soaking/boiling etc. The oligosacharrides cannot (unless sprouted). I'm not sure if they have a worse side effect than flatulence.

My opinion: its a legume and therefore not paleo. However, beans/legumes are #11 in the 12 steps of Dr. Harris and I still do high fat dairy. I don't go out of my way to eat beans, but if I see some good chili and it has beans, well, down the hatch it goes! The real question is your tolerance to them. Do you feel better when you avoid them? If you can't tell the difference, I see no problem with having them from time to time. I wouldn't eat them daily - but that's my opinion - not totally scientific - and I'm okay with that.

0e395acc856e3353f3f5892e6b09b0e7

(1227)

on December 04, 2010
at 02:42 PM

Thanks for the link. I like your easy peasy take on this. I'm not going to throw out my stash of chana dal, but not rush to eat it either. I'm still new enough to paleo that I'm not doing much eating outside of Panu's steps. I do eat Lindt's 85% chocolate every single day, however.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on December 06, 2010
at 03:35 PM

I eat that chocolate probably every other day! The wife just made chili with black beans this weekend and it was very tasty. I do avoid wheat at all cost - just a little makes me feel bad. And I'm a nazi about veg oils and most other "crap".

1
06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on December 02, 2010
at 02:14 PM

http://www.neurophys.wisc.edu/ravi/recipes/recipe9.html

"Dals (pronounced Daals) are dried legumes, belonging to the pea family. They are available in great variety all over India and make a very healthy alternative to meat dishes. The following recipe uses "chana" (pronounced chun-ah) dal, which is yellow in color. It is similar to, but not exactly like, dried yellow split peas. You must buy the genuine yellow chana dal from an Indian grocery store. The taste will be different if you use yellow split peas."

Cannot find anything about the Lectin content...but it does have some. Soaking helps. Being in the legume family, I would avoid it...but small amounts probably would be ok. If you have a blood glucose meter, test your blood after fasting 12 hours and then test at 1 hour to see how much your glucose is raised. Normal is around 95-100. A rise to 120 is not a problem, but anything higher could be problematic.

I have never really understood the desire to soak any cultivated product just to get it into a form that is not harmful to my body.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on December 02, 2010
at 06:15 PM

@Dex, yeah i like the last part of what you said: never understood the want to soak, and all. Before living this way, i spent years following the principles of weston price. While theyre spoton in many regards, the insistence on such processing of grains, nuts, and legumes, just to get them to be digestible always struck me as less-than-optimal. I understand in times of famine and all, but living today i just dont see the need.

A089b683ee0498f2b21b7edfa300e405

(3895)

on December 03, 2010
at 09:52 AM

@Dex, Soaking is only half the story. Even in India, where legumes are used a lot - traditionally, they are soaked, then ground into paste and let ferment before steaming/frying etc. With the advent of the pressure cooker and shortage of time a lot of these traditional methods are now given a go by.

0
6cd1fd237f38525a73efde95a79cc80d

on March 26, 2014
at 08:58 PM

Channa dal is gram dal which is closely related to garbanzo chick peas and it seems like they carry the same scientific name Channa dal has a very low GI when compared to garbanzo (which is also called kabuli channa).

-------------------Mendosa.com author puts channa dal at a high pedestal for diabetics. Good info in this site and good recipes with channa dal.

I don't know about Paleo but I have to comment that channa dal and kabuli have bad reviews with respect to food intolerance, delayed sensitivity and lectin issues which is widely discussed in Dr. D'adamo site as well as in ALCAT testing.

Based on Nourishing traditions soaking method and pressure cooking, there is a probablity the lectins and antinutrients will be minimized. I don't find any concrete study on this though.

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