6

votes

Hack my derpiness

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 08, 2012 at 9:22 PM

When I was in high school I worked at a camp for little kids. One day I was assigned to shadow a kid that they told me had something called dyspraxia. He was from England, where the condition is quite well-known. Apparently it's not much diagnosed here. But I think I was assigned to shadow him because we were so similar. I've always been incredibly uncoordinated. My mother pulled me out of school because she didn't want me sequestered in special ed, so I've never been evaluated for anything. But I've never really been able to play any sports that involve throwing or catching. I have always tripped a lot and just been derpy. I'm 25 and still don't have a driver's license despite having had MANY instructors. I really want to pass that test. It's also kind of expensive to constantly break/destroy things.

I am able to get things eventually if I work really hard on them for a long time, but any kind of boost in the area would make a huge difference to me. I have noticed that my coordination issues ebb and flow, so I think diet does make a difference. I was trying to remember one of the best times for me and I think that was when I did the Movnat workshop. I didn't injure myself very much there and managed to keep up with the group somewhat, which was highly unusual for me. Super 100% clean paleo diet, tons of exercise, tons of sunlight and fresh air, and good sleep. Kind of the opposite of now. So I'd like to run a self-experiment to see what works best. I think I'm at the perfect baseline right now because I'm eating a mediocre diet and not taking any supplements.

I'm probably going to do Seth Robert's balance experiment. But what dietary changes to test? So far I'm thinking of increasing omega-3 slightly (through food since I seem sensitive to fish oil supplements), decreasing omega-6 (I've been eating A LOT of that lately), increasing saturated fat from coconut and butter, going 100% gluten-free (lately I've been eating out and probably getting some trace amounts), and really instituting strict sleep hygiene. Any other ideas? Has anyone else noticed that diet/lifestyle changes effect their coordination/dyspraxia.

685e3c967e63b4eacccf02628fd9a3ac

(1026)

on February 15, 2012
at 11:36 AM

What were your results, Matthew? Parsley would be rich in boron too, but raisins seem to be the best source. All fruits and vegetables have quite some boron.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 10, 2012
at 06:33 PM

No, I played outside a lot. Maybe I hit my head way too many times though :) I remember falling out of swings, out of trees, etc. I wasn't allowed to have a computer until I was 14.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on February 10, 2012
at 06:11 PM

Just out of curiosity, would you classify your early childhood as more "inside-kid" oriented? I wonder about this. As a kid, I played a lot of sports and then would sit on my ass in front of a computer, so I wonder if I somehow nulled out the natural movement learning process. I have moments of total derp, but other times I'm quite fast and precise. I wonder how much constant physical play is required at a young age to really train balance and coordination - and if not getting enough sets you up for a life of walking into tables :|

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 10, 2012
at 05:29 PM

Yep, I do yoga and it's helped a lot with mobility issues. I am lucky to have found a class where they go slow, because it does take me a little longer to master the movements.

0faecc3397025eab246241f4dcd81f5e

(2361)

on February 09, 2012
at 08:39 PM

Interesting - the cerebellum is the area the Dore programme of exercises works on

3ea09e99d3631b6f19917d7b374e1cb3

(110)

on February 09, 2012
at 04:24 PM

FYI neurotransmitters in made in the gut do not cross the BBB to be used in the central nervous system. Amino acids have to be taken up via LNAA transport across the BBB to be made into neurotransmitters in the brain itself. GAPS is effective because inflammation due to toxins in the gut WILL lead to inflammation in the brain. As the gut barrier is eroded, so is the BBB, so leaky gut=leaky brain. A GAPS diet addresses this by restoring the integrity of the permeability of the gut.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on February 09, 2012
at 04:21 AM

Melissa, my husband has a severe neuro disorder and his body works against him more often than not. But he pushes the edge of what he can do safely every day, and despite being very physically weak, he works towards economy of movement and elegance of movement. He doesn't want to look as weak as he is and he doesn't want to get hurt. And none of his growth is physical - it's all mental. He CAN'T grow better muscles. Maybe you can't fix your brain all the way, like he can't fix his body - but maybe you can find workarounds, like he does. I am cheering you on!

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on February 08, 2012
at 11:18 PM

Stabby, the "brigade" part was a jab at my weight. :)

Fd1c2cf9a221fc05d3de453e57bcbb79

(0)

on February 08, 2012
at 11:12 PM

Along those lines, have you thought about/tried a somatic awareness practice like Feldenkrais? It could be a great complement to any nutritional hacking.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:48 PM

They called you a brigade?! Wikipedia says that "A brigade is a major tactical military formation that is typically composed of three to six battalions" One person cannot be a brigade! They are the oafs!

35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:47 PM

When you say you "got your ears checked" what does that mean? Visual exam of your eardrums and a hearing test? Or a full vestibular work up?

35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:39 PM

But continuing to challenge that "slowness of learning" while tweaking other things may help. From what I understand of neurology, you do have to continually work on strengthening connections in order to improve, whether one is trying to keep mentally nimble to combat alzheimers, regain control after paralysis or simply improve general proprioception.

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:22 PM

Oddly enough, my son was OK'ed by the school system today for "Occupational Therapy" today because at 7, he is still not coordinated enough to properly write. He is an Asbergers, part of the Autism spectrum. I wouldn't say he's clumsy, but he still lacks fine motor skills such as writing and tying shoes.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:20 PM

haha true, the amount in food is a little uncertain. I have just started a boron supplement as an experiment.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:19 PM

haha true. I have just started a boron supplement as an experiment.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:15 PM

Matthew you and your prunes, they'll be the death of you they will! But yeah he's right there are food sources, however it's hard to tell how much of a mineral is in the soil so I side with supplements.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:14 PM

Ha! I shouldn't assume things. Anyway, some people use borax (the stuff you put in the dishwasher) but when I did that people started to question my sanity, and it was also kind of gross and I started to question my own sanity, so I switched to boron caps http://www.iherb.com/Now-Foods-Boron-3-mg-250-Capsules/428?at=0 Good luck!

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:11 PM

Prunes and raisins FTW.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 08, 2012
at 10:06 PM

Where can a moron get a good source of boron?

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 08, 2012
at 09:40 PM

it makes sense because so many neurotransmitters are produced by the gut.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 08, 2012
at 09:40 PM

Yeah, Natasha Campbell McBride groups dyspraxia in with autism, ADHD, etc. as "gut & psychology syndrome"

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 08, 2012
at 09:39 PM

Seven years of gymnastics and never did manage to do a cartwheel. I'm amazed they even let me stay in the classes.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 08, 2012
at 09:38 PM

Um, yeah, I've had six or seven years of gymnastics. This is a neurological thing that you can't just learn your way out of. With private lessons and lots of work, I've found I can excel in some sports, but there is always a general slowness of learning.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 08, 2012
at 09:36 PM

@primallykosher that's exactly what I thought when I saw the notes on the wikipedia article about the comorbidity of dyspraxia with conditions and diseases like ADHD and Asperger's.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 08, 2012
at 09:33 PM

For those of us that need a little info on dyspraxia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Developmental_dyspraxia

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 08, 2012
at 09:32 PM

For those of us that need a little info on dyspraxia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Developmental_dyspraxia

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 08, 2012
at 09:32 PM

For those of use that need a little info on dyspraxia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Developmental_dyspraxia

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on February 08, 2012
at 09:32 PM

It looks slightly autistic related though. Perhaps there is a gut brain issue going on, which would be why your mediocre diet is giving you issues. SCD and GAPS groups may know more about this medical derpiness.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 08, 2012
at 09:31 PM

Yeah, got my ears checked, my eyes checked too. All OK.

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

13 Answers

7
Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on February 08, 2012
at 09:51 PM

What I would do is tinker with every possible nutritional and lifestyle modification you can. Eliminate all factors you can possibly find in a systematic way. It might not be nutritional, but oftentimes people benefit from the fringe of nutritional intervention. For example the boron that I tweeted about which I think you saw. Although I don't expect you to remember it (and Julianne over there saw it too. Hi Julianne! Oh the nostalgia.)

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7889884

"When contrasted with the high boron intake, low dietary boron resulted in significantly poorer performance (p < 0.05) on tasks emphasizing manual dexterity (studies II and III); eye-hand coordination (study II); attention (all studies); perception (study III); encoding and short-term memory (all studies); and long-term memory (study I)."

Low boron levels are bad for the brain, and depending on region, diet, and what they do to the water, intake can be low. Compound that with your particular history of GI problems which might mean malabsorption, and we have grounds for a hypotheses. Test it and let me know how it went so I can send a letter to Hugh Laurie and tell him that House ain't so hot (if I'm not right that still doesn't mean he's as hot as people think!)

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:19 PM

haha true. I have just started a boron supplement as an experiment.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 08, 2012
at 10:06 PM

Where can a moron get a good source of boron?

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:11 PM

Prunes and raisins FTW.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19235)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:20 PM

haha true, the amount in food is a little uncertain. I have just started a boron supplement as an experiment.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:14 PM

Ha! I shouldn't assume things. Anyway, some people use borax (the stuff you put in the dishwasher) but when I did that people started to question my sanity, and it was also kind of gross and I started to question my own sanity, so I switched to boron caps http://www.iherb.com/Now-Foods-Boron-3-mg-250-Capsules/428?at=0 Good luck!

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:15 PM

Matthew you and your prunes, they'll be the death of you they will! But yeah he's right there are food sources, however it's hard to tell how much of a mineral is in the soil so I side with supplements.

685e3c967e63b4eacccf02628fd9a3ac

(1026)

on February 15, 2012
at 11:36 AM

What were your results, Matthew? Parsley would be rich in boron too, but raisins seem to be the best source. All fruits and vegetables have quite some boron.

5
3ea09e99d3631b6f19917d7b374e1cb3

on February 08, 2012
at 10:36 PM

OK this is the third time I'm typing this- I really want you to have this information!

You need to have your cerebellum and vestibular systems checked out by a functional neurologist. Neurons need two things to live- fuel & activation. By activating them, you encourage them to branch out and grow new connections. This is neuroplasticity and can happen throughout your lifetime. If these areas of the brain are weak, and from your symptoms, they seem like prime candidates, firing into them from connecting parts of the brain can strengthen them and improve their function. This can be done with really simple exercises, applied properly.

I would recommend looking for someone who holds a diplomate from the American Chiropractic Neurology Board (acnb.org). Very few if any medical neurologists will look at this from a functional perspective- they are only trained to look for organic lesions. And of course, if they can't medicate it, or cut it out, there's not a whole lot else for them left to do. You can check out this video at myhoperestored.org to get a little better idea of what is involved in functional neurology. (Warning the video is a little bit cheesy.)

Also, gluten antibodies have been shown to have an affinity for Perkenje cell's in the cerebellum, this is the basis for what's known in the literature as gluten ataxia. So if you're symptoms get worse after gluten-watch out.

Bonus: a lot of my functional neurologist colleagues are excellent functional medicine docs that can help you hack the diet end of things too.

You can always get in touch with me if you need an personal referrals, depending on if I know anyone good in your area.

0faecc3397025eab246241f4dcd81f5e

(2361)

on February 09, 2012
at 08:39 PM

Interesting - the cerebellum is the area the Dore programme of exercises works on

3
747f9c27424619fe3ae717c7455c292e

on February 08, 2012
at 11:12 PM

I don't have any dietary suggestions, but I second Dean's deliberate practice answer.

I've been practicing aikido for 10 years, and I've had to learn countless new motions that were unnatural at first. A number of people in my college club were uncoordinated, and with practice everyone improved, to some degree or another.

The nice thing about aikido that it really forces you gain a better understanding of biomechanics, both your own, and of your partner. After ten years of aikido I'm much better at watching people's motions and suggesting improvements, both with aikido, but also with other things like throwing motions.

The "deliberate" in deliberate practice is key. Most people screw up new motions by rushing them, and focusing on the intended end result, rather than the process. Since your body isn't familiar with the motion yet, focusing on the result achieves nothing. It's best to move very slowly and let your body become familiar with the new motion.

Tetsuzan Kuroda sensei is able to move freakishly fast, but from what I have been told, a large part of his training is super slow. By moving slowly he is able to remove extraneous motion.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BSqlc_hQz08

I'd suggest picking up an activity that is going to teach a number of new, deliberate motions using your entire body. MovNat might fit this bill, I don't know. Aikido certainly fits the bill for me, and other "internal" arts like Tai Chi, Baguazhang, etc... might as well.

3
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on February 08, 2012
at 09:36 PM

It's spooky that you should ask this now. In my routine reading the other day the term ataxia came up and, as I read about it, I became convinced that I'd had mild issues with it in the 2-3 years before I switched to ancestral eating.

I remember lots of minor incidents in which my balance wavered as I moved around; I had definitely become "clumsy" which was a definite deterioration for me. I was afraid to hold babies, puppies and kittens I was so lacking in confidence although my grip was strong at first. Anyhow, ataxia was listed as something that can be caused by gluten.

Now that I have read about ataxia and you have asked about coordination and dyspraxia, I can say I HAVE experienced a change since I changed to ancestral eating patterns. My balance and coordination are back to being rock solid while moving.

I honestly can't remember the last time my balance felt untrustworthy or I dropped something because my grip had relaxed without volition. I took a nasty fall last summer, but it started with a stepping stone sliding out from under my foot.

I hope you're able to a gain some insights that help you find what you're seeking. I feel like I've gotten to know you just a little bit and I want good things for you. Keep us posted!

3
1097af3c74bbb01abe61981dd2b20853

on February 08, 2012
at 09:34 PM

I was this kid until I was like ten. I said "I am tired of stubbing my toes on furnitures, smacking into door frames, running like a 'girl', and being unable to do anything sporting at all." And so I took gymnastics in grade five. What they taught me, and what stuck, was the notion of motion as a goal in itself. Don't think of what you want to pick up and then just pick it up. Think about moving your hand to the object then grasping it. Think of doing that smoothly. Think of all the places between where your body is now and where you want it to go. Think it through. Watch you hand move. Watch your feet move. Watch and think.

Took all year but I stopped smacking into things, tripping over stuff, stubbing my toes and being generally derpy, unless I was really distracted. By the time high school rolled around I could even hit a few home runs and play volleyball competently.

So "think it through" and practice doing just that for a year.

Fd1c2cf9a221fc05d3de453e57bcbb79

(0)

on February 08, 2012
at 11:12 PM

Along those lines, have you thought about/tried a somatic awareness practice like Feldenkrais? It could be a great complement to any nutritional hacking.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 08, 2012
at 09:38 PM

Um, yeah, I've had six or seven years of gymnastics. This is a neurological thing that you can't just learn your way out of. With private lessons and lots of work, I've found I can excel in some sports, but there is always a general slowness of learning.

35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:39 PM

But continuing to challenge that "slowness of learning" while tweaking other things may help. From what I understand of neurology, you do have to continually work on strengthening connections in order to improve, whether one is trying to keep mentally nimble to combat alzheimers, regain control after paralysis or simply improve general proprioception.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 08, 2012
at 09:39 PM

Seven years of gymnastics and never did manage to do a cartwheel. I'm amazed they even let me stay in the classes.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on February 09, 2012
at 04:21 AM

Melissa, my husband has a severe neuro disorder and his body works against him more often than not. But he pushes the edge of what he can do safely every day, and despite being very physically weak, he works towards economy of movement and elegance of movement. He doesn't want to look as weak as he is and he doesn't want to get hurt. And none of his growth is physical - it's all mental. He CAN'T grow better muscles. Maybe you can't fix your brain all the way, like he can't fix his body - but maybe you can find workarounds, like he does. I am cheering you on!

2
D81880919f3d4b75b6ca8380914137d1

on February 10, 2012
at 05:15 PM

Melissa,

I've experienced similar coordination problems and have always "feared" basketballs and other flying objects coming towards me. I have never played sports because when someone throws a ball towards me, I duck down and shield my face. I trip a lot, presumably on my own feet, and tend to run into things like doorways and other objects that most people probably don't find challenging. As for diet, I grew up on the low-fat 80's Snackwell's crap and evolved into a vegan. Now I eat paleo (with) dairy and have not considered diet as being a factor with my coordination. I've suspected that some of the coordination problems are a result of being extremely nearsighted and unable to wear contact lenses (only glasses). HOWEVER, I do not have any coordination problems when I am practicing yoga on the mat, and I have seen some improvement in coordination over the past 8 years that I have been doing yoga. Part of this could be due to going barefoot more often and developing the small muscles in the feet and ankles. Since I have started barefoot running and wearing Vibram shoes, I have stopped getting mysterious bruises everywhere from running into things. So, my suggestion is to go barefoot as often as possible, exercise your feet, and practice yoga a few times a week.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 10, 2012
at 05:29 PM

Yep, I do yoga and it's helped a lot with mobility issues. I am lucky to have found a class where they go slow, because it does take me a little longer to master the movements.

2
284213562569be43dfda0ad40914da6f

on February 09, 2012
at 01:07 AM

  1. I am not the most coordinated of dynamic movers but I am able to catch things that fall off the table, a shelf in the fridge or a cabinet. Have you observed yourself reacting to falling objects without knowing that you were about to initiate motion?

  2. Do you think driving is challenging because you are not tracking the dividing line well (with your eyes) or because you are not reacting in time?

  3. For the balance experiment (as the owner of weak calf muscles and frequently sprained ankles), I would suggest using something other than the board. A lengthwise-folded towel works well.

  4. Ive experienced the best coordination while eating quite a bit of ghee--i think the fat is essentially unchanged during the rendering process so maybe it has something to do with the proteins and other solids that are removed. I make my own and wait until there's a clear majority of black solids at the bottom of the pan. I tested this out by doing concentric-only box jumps and I managed to improve. Still, however, can't hit the cricket ball consistently.

2
C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on February 08, 2012
at 10:26 PM

Check out the GAPS (Gut and Psychology Syndrome) dietary protocol. Dispraxia is actually listed on the cover as one of the many GAPS issues the diet addresses. Paleo is pretty darn close to the GAPS prescription but has an special intro phase and focuses lots on good gut health to heal brain related issues. If a dietary intervention is what you're looking for I can't think of anything more on point. I'm practicing it in conjunction with Paleo dietary guidelines.

So basically more homemade bone broth (building blocks of a healthy/healing gut), fermented veggies and dairy (healthy bacteria), and probiotics (more healthy bacteria).

http://gapsdiet.com/INTRODUCTION_DIET.html http://gapsdiet.com/The_Diet.html

I hope this helps.

2
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:17 PM

I have always been a bit Derpy, was nicknamed "The Oaf Brigade" in high school. Have been known to knock over whole bar tables at random while influenced by a very small amount of alcohol. If the Education system had been more prepared for Asbergers (and it's effect on fine motor skills for some) back in the early 80's I probably would have had more specific help instead of special ed, copious drugs, and being told to avoid sports.

I know you are already fairly mobile, which has helped me immensely. My next "evolution" will be spending more time doing some offroad dynamic movement styled stuff, as well as continuing my constant drilling of olympic weightlifting.

I've found I'm less clumsy when fasted, oddly enough. I seem to have a more careful "physical awareness". My best workouts always seem to be 6-8 hours after feeding, as opposed to the old standby (1-2 hours pre-workout meal before training). Since my focus is on jumping and olympic lifting, it requires quite a bit of coordination and balance.

Now that I think about it, maybe I could progress to an OMAD diet (one meal a day) and do a bit more "dynamic" movement (hiking/jumping offroad).

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:48 PM

They called you a brigade?! Wikipedia says that "A brigade is a major tactical military formation that is typically composed of three to six battalions" One person cannot be a brigade! They are the oafs!

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on February 08, 2012
at 11:18 PM

Stabby, the "brigade" part was a jab at my weight. :)

1
912ec069b5bd84af1b6ef7545b950908

on February 09, 2012
at 04:29 AM

Are you somewhere that you could take nia classes? Nia integrates modern dance and martial arts practices. It sounded really airy-fairy to me when I started doing it, but it's helped a lot with my balance and coordination. I was a grade-school gymnastics charity case, too, although in my case it had to do with long-term inner ear issues as well as some other problems.

1
C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on February 08, 2012
at 09:29 PM

There is a scientific name for being a Derpina?!? LOL

http://knowyourmeme.com/photos/226418-derpina

Do you have any inner ear problems or a history of them?

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 08, 2012
at 09:31 PM

Yeah, got my ears checked, my eyes checked too. All OK.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 08, 2012
at 09:40 PM

Yeah, Natasha Campbell McBride groups dyspraxia in with autism, ADHD, etc. as "gut & psychology syndrome"

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on February 08, 2012
at 09:40 PM

it makes sense because so many neurotransmitters are produced by the gut.

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:22 PM

Oddly enough, my son was OK'ed by the school system today for "Occupational Therapy" today because at 7, he is still not coordinated enough to properly write. He is an Asbergers, part of the Autism spectrum. I wouldn't say he's clumsy, but he still lacks fine motor skills such as writing and tying shoes.

3ea09e99d3631b6f19917d7b374e1cb3

(110)

on February 09, 2012
at 04:24 PM

FYI neurotransmitters in made in the gut do not cross the BBB to be used in the central nervous system. Amino acids have to be taken up via LNAA transport across the BBB to be made into neurotransmitters in the brain itself. GAPS is effective because inflammation due to toxins in the gut WILL lead to inflammation in the brain. As the gut barrier is eroded, so is the BBB, so leaky gut=leaky brain. A GAPS diet addresses this by restoring the integrity of the permeability of the gut.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on February 08, 2012
at 09:32 PM

It looks slightly autistic related though. Perhaps there is a gut brain issue going on, which would be why your mediocre diet is giving you issues. SCD and GAPS groups may know more about this medical derpiness.

35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:47 PM

When you say you "got your ears checked" what does that mean? Visual exam of your eardrums and a hearing test? Or a full vestibular work up?

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on February 08, 2012
at 09:36 PM

@primallykosher that's exactly what I thought when I saw the notes on the wikipedia article about the comorbidity of dyspraxia with conditions and diseases like ADHD and Asperger's.

0
2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on February 08, 2012
at 10:15 PM

Balance should be established in childhood, and I have no clue how much improvement can be expected for an adult. But the principle still applies: practice, practice, practice... deliberate practice at the edge of your comfort zone! How is juggling for a goal?

And for practice to work best you need to feed your brain. A proper paleo diet (whatever that is) should contain all the building blocks for myelination of those balance and coordination pathways, while supporting optimal brain function. And it won't contain as many unnatural substances to screw with your body's chemical balancing either... no wonder a strict diet did you good!

It is hard to get good amounts of DHA/EPA from clean sources, and vitamin K2 in general, so I would supplement those. A neurosurgeon might have even more recommendations.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!