2

votes

Why does good bacteria not benefit from sugar?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 12, 2013 at 11:20 PM

It seems strange to me that sugar causes bad bacteria to grow, while the good bacteria apparently just ignores it

Any reason for this?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on March 13, 2013
at 12:21 PM

@huntinbears, what you want is homeostatis not good dominate or bad dominated. The best way to deal with overgrowth is to repopulate the good without creating an environment that supports the bad. So I would say both

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on March 13, 2013
at 12:19 PM

@stephenr, afaik yes. But over intake of anything will. @vb, our gut flora is constantly going through its life cycle. The best bet is to continue to consume good bacteria.

7cf9f5b08a41ecf2a2d2bc0b31ea6fa0

(4176)

on March 13, 2013
at 03:58 AM

Interesting answer! If I have an overgrowth of bad bacteria, can this be cured simply by drinking lots of good bacteria (kefir)? as opposed to limiting sugar? or both?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on March 13, 2013
at 03:23 AM

Thank you for your answer. So interesting! What helps bacteria to grow? Or does it depend on the kind of bacteria?

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on March 13, 2013
at 02:39 AM

Interesting I didn't realize it was because bacteria dehydrate the bacteria. Makes sense I guess, would salt do that too though?

Medium avatar

(39821)

on March 13, 2013
at 12:02 AM

The good bacteria are on the Atkins diet as well.

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1 Answers

2
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on March 13, 2013
at 12:06 AM

Part 1, your question:

The truth is that all bacteria can be killed by sugar. Essentially (this is a vast oversimplification) the sugar dehydrates the bacteria via hypertonic process.

The problem is we consume far more bad bacteria than good bacteria. So sugar kills off bacteria which we repopulate with bad bacteria and cause a massive imbalance.

But the effect of sugar on bacteria is only one of the problems with sugar.

Part 2, what I think you are asking:

Yeast and Fungus, like candida, actually can "consume" and ferment sugars which lead to continued growth. These fungi also contribute to destroying good bacteria in the gut.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on March 13, 2013
at 03:23 AM

Thank you for your answer. So interesting! What helps bacteria to grow? Or does it depend on the kind of bacteria?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on March 13, 2013
at 12:21 PM

@huntinbears, what you want is homeostatis not good dominate or bad dominated. The best way to deal with overgrowth is to repopulate the good without creating an environment that supports the bad. So I would say both

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on March 13, 2013
at 02:39 AM

Interesting I didn't realize it was because bacteria dehydrate the bacteria. Makes sense I guess, would salt do that too though?

7cf9f5b08a41ecf2a2d2bc0b31ea6fa0

(4176)

on March 13, 2013
at 03:58 AM

Interesting answer! If I have an overgrowth of bad bacteria, can this be cured simply by drinking lots of good bacteria (kefir)? as opposed to limiting sugar? or both?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on March 13, 2013
at 12:19 PM

@stephenr, afaik yes. But over intake of anything will. @vb, our gut flora is constantly going through its life cycle. The best bet is to continue to consume good bacteria.

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