2

votes

helicobacter pylori treatment - the paleo way?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 02, 2012 at 5:46 AM

my girlfriend was recently diagnosed with the helicobacter pylori bacteria and the doctors sound like they want to prescribe a course of antibiotics. Based on my research however, it sounds like many people have this bacteria and show no symptoms, which makes me wonder if antibiotics is the best course of treatment.

What would the paleo way of treatment be? Her symptoms generally include an upset, "clenched" feeling in her stomach, and diarrhea. She currently eats "somewhat" paleo along with me, though she sometimes eats some grains and tofu. I've suggested her trying probiotics, which she's been on for about a week now.

thanks!

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 23, 2013
at 08:09 PM

I forgot where I read it - SCD diet? siboinfo.com?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 23, 2013
at 08:09 PM

It has something (I am not a chemist, I forgot) that aggravates SIBO. It is good for H. Pylori though.

7767e05a8c4504f6be03f13ee40815cd

(1299)

on April 23, 2013
at 07:54 PM

Why is mastic gum bad for SIBO?

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 10:29 AM

Just treat them as highly trained people, but not perfect or omniscient, and all is good.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 10:26 AM

+1 Unvoting your answer, despite my occasional misgivings about doctors. While they arent hitting google scholar up on my illnesses when I get them like I do, or logically giving deep thought deconstructing it, they are still fonts of invaluable information, experience, help and advice. Worth running your ideas past them, even if they might boohoo them, it can also help to get a trained professionals input on stuff, so why not?...(its still your body, and your illness, and your choice etc)

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 10:14 AM

They are good and helpful at what they do, alot of times thats enough, sometimes its not what u desperately need, as a sick person. Nobodies perfect, right?

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 10:13 AM

I agree, though, that one should bring any alternate ideas up with the doctor! But its kinda above and beyond to expect that level of detail or side research from them, and they can often be dismissive - sometimes contradicting recent research simply because they are so used to hearing quackery from natropaths etc and quotes from wikipedia and are busy people. Sometimes they may have some good refutation here, though, or alternative advice - and thats worth checking in for.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 10:06 AM

I agree, though, that one should bring ideas up with the doctor. But its kinda above and beyond to expect that level of detail or side research from them, and they can often be dismissive - sometimes contradicting recent research simply because they are so used to hearing quackery from natropaths etc and quotes from wikipedia. Sometimes they may have some good refutation though, or alternative advice - and thats worth checking, even if at other times they are merely dismissive, or even ignorant of stuff that recent research has shown.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 10:00 AM

In short, its not their wellbeing. They have trained extensively, and are useful for what they are trained to do, but thats not always everything you want, as a sick person. As a sick person, you want a logical exposition of all the possibile diagnoses, a range of effective treatments that you can choose between based on pros and cons and a full functional veiw of whats going on, and how to fix it. Thats really asking too much of doctors to even expect that. They are busy people.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 09:57 AM

Think about it- your _personally_ sick, and suffering - who has more vestment/interest in the outcome, and the treatment you or the doctor? A doctor is paid to be professional, helpful but also skeptical. Often if your actually personally sick, you want more than that. You want logical speculation, perhaps a range of possibilites, the very latest relevant research, other options for cures and treatments that are genuinely useful. You also want to consider the choice of using medication or not carefully - there are risks with those things, however small, its your health, not the prescribers.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 09:45 AM

Sadly, most doctors visits arent like having doctor house on your case, like some kind of dedicated detective. Doctors are just people, they get appathetic in their work, they can be closed minded to ideas they dont like, they dont spend all their spare time reading the latest research on every medical topic, and they dont care for peoples issues like the patient cares for their own wellbeing. Thus its only natural in this world, that sometimes people are going to want to leave the doctors advice behind and chart there own course.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 09:40 AM

" There is also a reason why we waste 10 plus yrs of our lives studying medicine." - Money?

7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2040)

on December 02, 2012
at 06:01 PM

I don't think this should be down voted as PG is just saying simply to discuss what you've researched with your doc. A course of antibiotics is probably a good idea. You can follow it up with lots of rest/probiotics and a healthy diet to help repopulate the gut. I like having a balanced point of view on this site and answers like this shouldn't be discouraged.

E773ca32b29508bae2055579a26afa98

(470)

on December 02, 2012
at 07:18 AM

Tony was smart to consult a doctor and even smarter to take responsibility by doing more research online.

  • Ef40e29cee3d4f7b6d60e3473824f1dc

    asked by

    (272)
  • Views
    21.3K
  • Last Activity
    1503D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

9 Answers

4
81ead405cb501cece1b7bf8f2a7c0f33

on December 03, 2012
at 08:33 AM

My mom had the h. pylori bacteria, and suffered for years with pyloric ulcers and the symptoms your GF has. I can't stress this enough: research biofilms. The h. pylori bacteria essentially "sticks" to the lining of the stomach (via the biofilm), which means that even if antibiotics kill some of it, they won't be able to kill all of it. Some bacteria always stays behind, protected by the biofilm, and free to repopulate once the antibiotic treatment is over. We got rid of my mom's decades-long problem with a specific protocol. For 45 days, she took Interfase Plus, then Mastic Gum pills, and probiotics. And she substituted topical magnesium oil for magnesium supplements, because the h. pylori steal the body's magnesium to stick to the stomach wall. They also constantly throw off the ph of the stomach, which is part of the discomfort. My mom also chewed mastic gum (the actual gum - tastes kinda like licorice), because sometimes h. pylori bacteria hides in infected teeth or gums.

Anyway, my mom went from being hospitalized with pyloric ulcers to being completely h. pylori free. She is amazed that years of misery with digestive issues is gone, and so much happier. Plus, pyloric ulcers can lead to cancer...so the protocol likely saved her life.

The Interfase is an enzyme that basically dissolves the bonds the h. pylori use to stick to the stomach lining. Once those are dissolved, the Masic Gum pills (taken 30-45min later) kills the exposed bacteria. She might feel kinda sick the first week because the body is reacting to all that bacteria die-off. Anyway, she should take the probiotics to repopulate her gut with good bacteria. The chewing gum is an extra guarantee to make sure she doesn't swallow any bacteria living in infected teeth or gums. This protocol is very effective. It worked for my mom. It changed her life. Best of luck!

3
Bcb2f5436d11467e89123680c046b858

(1356)

on December 02, 2012
at 03:25 PM

Chris Kresser has an excellent series about GERD in which he addresses H. pylori.

2
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on December 02, 2012
at 05:59 AM

  1. Mastic gum. Make sure she does not have SIBO. If she has SIBO, mastic gum is a no-no.

  2. Look up Aglaee the Paleo dietitian website and follow her SIBO healing protocol - it is good for H. Pylori because it helps the immune system. H. Pylory is found in 84% people, but it only acts up in people whose immune system is compromised).

  3. Probiotics are good, but a very limited amount of fermented foods are better. Sauerkraut juice would help. Make sure, again, she does not have SIBO.

  4. I would eliminate grains and tofu for at least 6 months and re-introduce them only after her tests show negative results.

Believe it or not, I had a H.Pylori test done in May this year - it was positive. I had one in November (just recently) - it was negative. The only thing I have done was following a very very very strict LC diet with bone broth in the morning, liver at lunch and carbs at night. Nothing else. Not even mastic gum.

Actually, I have reacted to mastic gum because I have SIBO (I did not know at the time, the official diagnosis was gastric erosion). So I have stopped using it.

Good luck.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 23, 2013
at 08:09 PM

It has something (I am not a chemist, I forgot) that aggravates SIBO. It is good for H. Pylori though.

7767e05a8c4504f6be03f13ee40815cd

(1299)

on April 23, 2013
at 07:54 PM

Why is mastic gum bad for SIBO?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on April 23, 2013
at 08:09 PM

I forgot where I read it - SCD diet? siboinfo.com?

1
C40ce8fc4392ea8ee1f8194f40540307

(110)

on December 03, 2012
at 02:59 AM

Probiotics in Feces and Breastmilk more effective than antibiotics against h pylori

Not saying she should eat poop, but this was really interesting. Sounds like you are on the right track with the Probiotics. Maybe water kefir could help?

1
543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on December 03, 2012
at 01:23 AM

In my mind, the h pylori thing is a conundrum.
Over 80% of people infected with h pylori show no symptoms, according to wiki.

So in people with symptoms, how can we be sure they are due to pylori and not something else?

I have even read that pylori may be beneficial (don't have source at hand, but a google will likely find some).

So may be the problems only begin when pylori gets out of control...& starts to run riot.
This could happen if you have low stomach acid, it would seem that pylori thrives in low stomach acid.
In fact pylori itself will lower stomach acid, according to wiki (again), pylori actually "neutralizes and decreases secretion of gastric acid to aid its survival in the stomach."

So, attaining normal stomach acid levels (if low) would be a good thing;
...Increase metabolism to normal if low (slowing of the body???s basal metabolic rate associated with hypothyroidism may cause low stomach acid).
...Consider taking betaine HCL in capsule form.
...Taking ACV or Lemon Juice with meals (or before?) may help
...Ginger? another one that may help

Possible 'things' that may help eradicate or limit (rein back) pylori are mentioned in the other answers & in the Chris Kresser posts linked by Annika.
Here are few that may or may not have already been mentioned; iodine, manuka honey, olive leaf extract, DGL.

0
D08c0aa524cbf3eb43bb8484e7b8bb71

(10)

on January 18, 2013
at 10:27 PM

I found these two sites helpful: http://amyking.wordpress.com/2009/02/20/im-so-happy-i-have-h-pylori/

She references this site which includes more info on the supplements and protocol that helped her: http://www.advancedhealing.com/heartburn-gastritis-gerd-achlorhydria-h-pylori-treatment/

I went through two rounds of antibiotic treatments, due to be retested soon to see if the second round worked. I don't think probiotics alone will cure it but it can help to alleviate some of the symptoms.

0
75d65450b6ff0be7b969fb321f1200ac

(2506)

on December 03, 2012
at 01:29 PM

I was diagnosed with H. pylori some months after going paleo. I had been suffering from IBS and GERD for quite some time. Paleo did help, significantly. But only when the H. pylori was eradicated through a rather unpleasant course of antibiotics did my digestion problems all but disappear.

Yeah, taking antibiotics sucks. The H. pylori program required me to be on two antibiotics for 10 days. No doubt helpful bacteria was destroyed along the way. But on balance this treatment protocol is better than trying to use alternatives, such as taking mastic gum, because the results are pretty much assured (90% success rate) and one's body should recover in time from the antibacterial onslaught.

I don't know why I became a victim of H. pylori. But now that I clear of it I hope eating healthily (paleo) will prevent me from getting reinfected.

_Lazza

0
0b73cdbd0cb68aeeda14dafeebb2f828

on December 03, 2012
at 12:24 PM

Evaluation of Helicobacter Pylori eradication in pediatric patients by triple therapy plus lactoferrin and probiotics compared to triple therapy alone

Raw Milk contains more lactoferrin than pasteurized/homogenized milk. In UK cheese makers are good source ask at your local farmers market and they may be able to order if for you. Adding the contents of a probiotic capsule to starter culture when making yoghurt increases the range of good gut flora.

Using a lactoferrin supplement may help reduce pathogenic gut flora while promoting the growth of good gut flora.

Antimicrobial Activity of Curcumin against Helicobacter pylori Turmeric Tea is used a lot in the Far East.

Green tea inhibits Helicobacter growth You can also add a slice of raw turmeric to your tea pot when brewing green tea. Slice of Ginger Root may also add to the anti-H Pylori action

Activities of Garlic Oil, Garlic Powder, and Their Diallyl Constituents against Helicobacter pylori

-1
62442eec80b7d248ccfa08f98f736748

on December 02, 2012
at 06:41 AM

No offense but u r right that h pylori is a common bscteria. There is a reason why it causes some people trouble while others no. There is also a reason why we waste 10 plus yrs of our lives studying medicine. So while u may think u found something on the Internet that refutes ur doctor, I would suggest u go bring this up with doctor before asking people online here. We don't lead miserable lives for ten yrs only to be ignored got webmd.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 09:40 AM

" There is also a reason why we waste 10 plus yrs of our lives studying medicine." - Money?

E773ca32b29508bae2055579a26afa98

(470)

on December 02, 2012
at 07:18 AM

Tony was smart to consult a doctor and even smarter to take responsibility by doing more research online.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 09:45 AM

Sadly, most doctors visits arent like having doctor house on your case, like some kind of dedicated detective. Doctors are just people, they get appathetic in their work, they can be closed minded to ideas they dont like, they dont spend all their spare time reading the latest research on every medical topic, and they dont care for peoples issues like the patient cares for their own wellbeing. Thus its only natural in this world, that sometimes people are going to want to leave the doctors advice behind and chart there own course.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 09:57 AM

Think about it- your _personally_ sick, and suffering - who has more vestment/interest in the outcome, and the treatment you or the doctor? A doctor is paid to be professional, helpful but also skeptical. Often if your actually personally sick, you want more than that. You want logical speculation, perhaps a range of possibilites, the very latest relevant research, other options for cures and treatments that are genuinely useful. You also want to consider the choice of using medication or not carefully - there are risks with those things, however small, its your health, not the prescribers.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 10:14 AM

They are good and helpful at what they do, alot of times thats enough, sometimes its not what u desperately need, as a sick person. Nobodies perfect, right?

7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2040)

on December 02, 2012
at 06:01 PM

I don't think this should be down voted as PG is just saying simply to discuss what you've researched with your doc. A course of antibiotics is probably a good idea. You can follow it up with lots of rest/probiotics and a healthy diet to help repopulate the gut. I like having a balanced point of view on this site and answers like this shouldn't be discouraged.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 10:00 AM

In short, its not their wellbeing. They have trained extensively, and are useful for what they are trained to do, but thats not always everything you want, as a sick person. As a sick person, you want a logical exposition of all the possibile diagnoses, a range of effective treatments that you can choose between based on pros and cons and a full functional veiw of whats going on, and how to fix it. Thats really asking too much of doctors to even expect that. They are busy people.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 10:29 AM

Just treat them as highly trained people, but not perfect or omniscient, and all is good.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 10:13 AM

I agree, though, that one should bring any alternate ideas up with the doctor! But its kinda above and beyond to expect that level of detail or side research from them, and they can often be dismissive - sometimes contradicting recent research simply because they are so used to hearing quackery from natropaths etc and quotes from wikipedia and are busy people. Sometimes they may have some good refutation here, though, or alternative advice - and thats worth checking in for.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 10:26 AM

+1 Unvoting your answer, despite my occasional misgivings about doctors. While they arent hitting google scholar up on my illnesses when I get them like I do, or logically giving deep thought deconstructing it, they are still fonts of invaluable information, experience, help and advice. Worth running your ideas past them, even if they might boohoo them, it can also help to get a trained professionals input on stuff, so why not?...(its still your body, and your illness, and your choice etc)

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on December 03, 2012
at 10:06 AM

I agree, though, that one should bring ideas up with the doctor. But its kinda above and beyond to expect that level of detail or side research from them, and they can often be dismissive - sometimes contradicting recent research simply because they are so used to hearing quackery from natropaths etc and quotes from wikipedia. Sometimes they may have some good refutation though, or alternative advice - and thats worth checking, even if at other times they are merely dismissive, or even ignorant of stuff that recent research has shown.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!