6

votes

Do probiotics lower the diversity of your gut bacteria? Do they choke out the resident good bacteria?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 25, 2012 at 9:35 PM

Mostly Im just curious. We have TONS of different kinds of friendly bacteria in our gut right? So wouldnt dosing them with only a few different kinds found in the various fermented milk products (kefir, yogurt etc) throw off that balance? Creating a monuculture just like the farms that only plant one crop?

I have read online to not be concerned with any lower gut discomfort after consuming kefir because "its just your gut bacteria duking it out with the newcomers'... Uh regardless of whether or not the bugs contained in kefir are good ones isnt killing off your residents a bad thng? Or do they only go after the less than desirable residents? Honestly it kind of feels like when I eat gluten by accident and my entire lower stomach feels like there was a massive die off.

I guess I am just wondering if the bacteria found in kefir is better than the normal SAD compliment but is going backwards for an already diverse healthy gut.

Also how in the world does anything alive survive the trip through the stomach.

Thanks=)

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on November 27, 2012
at 05:45 AM

ps matt I have been dying to pick your brain. do you have a throw away contact email that I could send you something at?

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on November 27, 2012
at 03:20 AM

Sorry I made assumptions. "Done deal" in the case of antibiotic use or chemo or any other thing that wipes out every living thing in the gut. I dont mean for anything that ails you.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 27, 2012
at 12:22 AM

Who says probiotic bacteria are necessarily going to cure what ails you?

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on November 26, 2012
at 02:52 AM

Huh..so they arent always effective. I thought it was kind of a done deal.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on November 26, 2012
at 02:51 AM

Thats an interesting idea.. but I wonder if the body would just compensate by producing more acid?

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on November 26, 2012
at 02:51 AM

wow.. thats pretty cool. Though it does make me wonder if we *should* just because we can.

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5 Answers

4
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 25, 2012
at 11:26 PM

When encapsulated the bacteria survive otherwise something like 99% are killed off in the stomach. They are only temporary means of repopulating gut flora. It's also possible your body will not recognize them and kill all probiotics entering your body. There's not enough research supporting that probiotics can treat or cure any sort of disease or ailment, rather that they may benefit digestive health.

I've been taking about 420 active billion probiotic bacteria a day and it has not treated any of my problems.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on November 26, 2012
at 02:52 AM

Huh..so they arent always effective. I thought it was kind of a done deal.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on November 27, 2012
at 05:45 AM

ps matt I have been dying to pick your brain. do you have a throw away contact email that I could send you something at?

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on November 27, 2012
at 03:20 AM

Sorry I made assumptions. "Done deal" in the case of antibiotic use or chemo or any other thing that wipes out every living thing in the gut. I dont mean for anything that ails you.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 27, 2012
at 12:22 AM

Who says probiotic bacteria are necessarily going to cure what ails you?

3
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 26, 2012
at 02:34 AM

I don't think we should be too worried about the little bugs we eat, they're designed to tolerate quite a bit. A study for example: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22281320 It also doesn't take many surviving microbes to populate down the line.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on November 26, 2012
at 02:51 AM

wow.. thats pretty cool. Though it does make me wonder if we *should* just because we can.

3
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on November 26, 2012
at 02:13 AM

This isn't an answer to your question, but I sometimes wonder if taking probiotics with lots of water and/or basic substances like baking soda would reduce the bacteriocidal ability of stomach acid and allow for the safer passage of probiotics into the intestines.

It makes sense in my head, but I haven't seen research supporting it. Anybody want to weight in on this?

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on November 26, 2012
at 02:51 AM

Thats an interesting idea.. but I wonder if the body would just compensate by producing more acid?

0
Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

on December 05, 2012
at 05:28 PM

I'd assume if probiotics wouldn't survive the GI, they'd be formulated for delayed release.

0
A089b683ee0498f2b21b7edfa300e405

on November 27, 2012
at 04:18 AM

Here are some well researched answers to your question:

www.syontix.com

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