2

votes

Should I avoid bacon on the whole30?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 28, 2011 at 8:29 PM

I'm bumping my ass back on track and doing whole30 (5 days in). Should I avoid bacon because of the small sugar content? I just found some nitrate/nitrite/antibiotic-free bacon at safeway but one of the ingredients is celery salt. I'm sure it's a minute amount, like the sugar, and I don't even know what celery salt is, if it's harmless or not. Should I eat it or return it? I only eat a couple pieces at a time.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on July 02, 2013
at 09:57 PM

Finally, "*Am I crazy here...* Seems like you are obsessing a bit, yes. :-P

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on July 02, 2013
at 09:56 PM

"*this and that until it is browned. Fried until browned = carcinogens, right?*" Somewhat true; when meats, starches, veggies, fruits are heated to the point of browning, many new molecules are formed; some are carcinogenic. This is especially true of breads and things like french fries. If your burgers off the grill don't look like charcoal briquettes, then I wouldn't worry about the amount you get from cooked meats.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on July 02, 2013
at 09:54 PM

Second, "we prepare bacon is fried -- really hot. Fried really got = Transfats, Yes?" **No.** Hydrogenated fats are an entirely different thing than possibly oxidized fats. Animals products don't naturally contains processed trans-fat (and the oddball natural trans fat like conjugated linolic acid are not usually grouped in when we say "trans fats").

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on July 02, 2013
at 09:52 PM

First, cured meats are one, traditional, way of processing meat, but they are a far cry from the bleached meat found in hot dogs, for e.g.

E687b5eb51456c9a0205aff406f44ca3

on May 25, 2012
at 10:30 PM

"back on tract"... nice!

2e841984c55e1f346f6e38f60c1620a6

(540)

on May 25, 2012
at 10:03 PM

agreed, the whole30 is a reboot and about being strict. I would never consider it a long term eating plan.

627cf3f5d1ddfb4c2f4c96169420f55f

(1621)

on July 05, 2011
at 08:08 PM

The whole point of a whole is to be strict. To follow rules. For 30 days. This is how one can get back on tract. Now, I believe that one should set their OWN rules but following the whole30 protocol is a good place to start. If one wants to include bacon then they should. I just wouldn't recommend eating along with other foods that we should eat in moderation. Be strict but follow your OWN rules.

65430e39d7e9e9322718d016fe668051

(2944)

on May 29, 2011
at 10:07 PM

Thanks Melissa. The one I found is nitrate/nitrite/antibiotic free.

6f2c00fcbf48c69f0ea212239b3e1178

on May 29, 2011
at 12:07 AM

Nuance = eating something even if it has something bad in it ?

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8 Answers

6
7e746be2f0e550a8cd7df881322ae705

on May 29, 2011
at 12:03 AM

If you are going to call it a Whole 30 and follow their rules, then it is NO BACON for you.

If you would like to call this a reset or a getting back on track month, then you need to define your parameters before you start and not make them up as you go along. Decide what's important to you and set up your own guidelines. Write them down, post them on the fridge, whatever, but follow them.

Personally, I think the Whole 30 is too strict. It makes transition harder than it needs to be. Some people do better with super strict though and some people need a gradual transition to Paleo eating. You should know which would work best for you.

4
0ed733c27d74a998a5a5b0cad0ce3682

on May 29, 2011
at 05:48 PM

I just responded to this exact question on the site. Bacon isn't off-limits during your Whole30, but it has to follow the same rules as everything else. No added sugar or nitrates/nitrites are often the stumbling block for commercially produced bacon, but if you can find some high quality stuff without the additives, it's good to go on the Whole30.

Best, Melissa

65430e39d7e9e9322718d016fe668051

(2944)

on May 29, 2011
at 10:07 PM

Thanks Melissa. The one I found is nitrate/nitrite/antibiotic free.

4
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on May 28, 2011
at 11:14 PM

My feeling is that Whole30 is too rule-based and doesn't handle nuance well. If Melissa sees one bad thing in something then it's banned. That may be and OK approach to turn around someone who is metabolically deranged, but I don't know. Granted I haven't helped nearly as many people as they have, but I'm a much bigger believer in nuance and understanding why you're eating what you're eating. I will eat a few slices of bacon with breakfast, but I won't have a pound a day. I'll have a handful of almonds in the afternoon as a snack, I won't eat a whole bag of them. We make fun of people who make arbitrary rules about what they won't eat (hint: vegetarians), so we shouldn't do the same. Now that doesn't mean there aren't things you should never eat (hint: wheat), but that's based on tons of science that says unequivocally that it's bad. Basically, you need to weigh the pros and cons of everything you eat and decide if it's worth it for you.

6f2c00fcbf48c69f0ea212239b3e1178

on May 29, 2011
at 12:07 AM

Nuance = eating something even if it has something bad in it ?

627cf3f5d1ddfb4c2f4c96169420f55f

(1621)

on July 05, 2011
at 08:08 PM

The whole point of a whole is to be strict. To follow rules. For 30 days. This is how one can get back on tract. Now, I believe that one should set their OWN rules but following the whole30 protocol is a good place to start. If one wants to include bacon then they should. I just wouldn't recommend eating along with other foods that we should eat in moderation. Be strict but follow your OWN rules.

2e841984c55e1f346f6e38f60c1620a6

(540)

on May 25, 2012
at 10:03 PM

agreed, the whole30 is a reboot and about being strict. I would never consider it a long term eating plan.

E687b5eb51456c9a0205aff406f44ca3

on May 25, 2012
at 10:30 PM

"back on tract"... nice!

4
9f9fa49265e03ddd2bf2bba5477a556b

(3184)

on May 28, 2011
at 08:42 PM

Well the best way to know if it is Whole30 friendly is check their blog:

http://whole9life.com/2011/05/the-bacon-bummer/

2
Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on May 28, 2011
at 11:58 PM

As long as it's the best quality uncured bacon you can find, I don't think there's any reason to exclude it.

0
A4ac9316e242250d83328a5ba92c5955

on July 02, 2013
at 08:42 PM

Hi Guys,

I'm looking into the Whole30 program and it has piqued my interest. However, there are some things nagging my brain about it -- Bacon, other fried items, transfats and carcinogens.

A cured meat like Bacon is considered processed meat by most standards, yes? How is it escaping the negatives associated with processed meats in the Whole30 plan?

Also, the way we prepare bacon is fried -- really hot. Fried really got = Transfats, Yes? Isn't it universally agreed that transfats are bad for humans?

I've been reading recipes that show fried this and that until it is browned. Fried until browned = carcinogens, right?

Am I crazy here or really missing something big in the Whole30 approach to things? I would truly appreciate some rational explanation to these seemingly giant oversights. And I'm open to scientific explanations, but not so interested in explanations that don't involve critical thought.

Help, anyone?

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on July 02, 2013
at 09:54 PM

Second, "we prepare bacon is fried -- really hot. Fried really got = Transfats, Yes?" **No.** Hydrogenated fats are an entirely different thing than possibly oxidized fats. Animals products don't naturally contains processed trans-fat (and the oddball natural trans fat like conjugated linolic acid are not usually grouped in when we say "trans fats").

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on July 02, 2013
at 09:57 PM

Finally, "*Am I crazy here...* Seems like you are obsessing a bit, yes. :-P

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on July 02, 2013
at 09:56 PM

"*this and that until it is browned. Fried until browned = carcinogens, right?*" Somewhat true; when meats, starches, veggies, fruits are heated to the point of browning, many new molecules are formed; some are carcinogenic. This is especially true of breads and things like french fries. If your burgers off the grill don't look like charcoal briquettes, then I wouldn't worry about the amount you get from cooked meats.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on July 02, 2013
at 09:52 PM

First, cured meats are one, traditional, way of processing meat, but they are a far cry from the bleached meat found in hot dogs, for e.g.

0
E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

on May 25, 2012
at 11:24 PM

Have you ever made your own bacon? I'm not sure where you live or what your access to pastured meats is, but I've been making my own bacon for probably four or five months now and I'll never go back to store-bought stuff. You can control the ingredients (including making them Whole30 compliant if you so choose). I don't think, by the way, that you can't eat bacon on a Whole30... just that you need to find some not cured with sugar to fit the rules of the program.

0
2e841984c55e1f346f6e38f60c1620a6

(540)

on May 25, 2012
at 10:02 PM

You can get whole30 approved bacon from US wellness meats which produces a sugar free version.

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