1

votes

How to obtain decent bacon?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 25, 2011 at 12:23 AM

I love bacon, but haven't been able to find any that looks reasonable in Sydney. In England there were literally hundreds of sources of great bacon, if only I'd take advantage of it more.

All I can find is smoked bacon - is that what you eat? Surely smoked bacon is not Paleo; who knows what additives they smoke it with. The other list of ingredients is also very off putting. A typical packet I saw was only 85% bacon.

So I'm wondering if it's realistic to somehow make my own "pure" unsmoked, untampered with bacon? Or can I request this from a butcher?

Any bacon hacks would be hugely appreciated!

F4d04667059bc682540fdfd8b40f13a7

on February 25, 2011
at 03:11 AM

Thanks Wayne - that's got to be worth a trip!

F4d04667059bc682540fdfd8b40f13a7

on February 25, 2011
at 12:38 AM

Thanks so much Jon - that looks absolutely great! I know what I'm doing this weekend...

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5 Answers

5
6d9b8105790efa406618c72e840f2093

on February 25, 2011
at 12:27 AM

You'll need to source a couple of ingredients, but they're probably both found at the same place; you're neighborhood butcher shop. Tell your butcher what you're planning to do, and ask for a piece of pork belly (make sure you don't get salt pork. You want fresh peork belly.). About 5 lbs is a pretty good place to start (don't make less than this or you will regret it later!) and also ask him or her for pink curing salt. Pink salt is a mixture about 6.5% sodium nitrite, and 93.5 percent kosher salt. It is called pink salt as it is dyed pink to prevent accidental use as regular salt. With these two items in hand, you're ready to get started.

Great homemade bacon recipe

One 5lb slab of pork belly, rind removed. Ask your butcher to take of the rind. 1/4 cup of salt 1 tsp pink salt Generous half cup of maple syrup or honey. (You could also substitute a half cup of brown sugar if you prefer. That's it, there are only three ingredients needed! Rub the pink salt all over both sides of the bacon and then slather on the salt andmaple syrup or honey as well, trying to get all exposed surfaces coated. Pop the pork belly into a large Ziploc bag, and keep it in the fridge for a week, turning every day. There will be some liquid accumulating in the bag; this is normal, don't remove it.

After a week, take the bacon out of the bag, wash off any salt that remains...and voila, you have bacon.

Now fry a little piece cut out from the center of the belly. It's bacon after all, so it should be salty; but if you think it is too salty, try soaking it in cold water for about an hour. This will leach out some of the salt. Repeat the tasting and if you still think it's too salty, give it another hour in a new batch of water.

You now have great tasting bacon that's ready to enjoy; and you can either now slice it up and watch how fast it disappears from your fridge, or get ready to take it the next level by hardwood smoking it.

The smoking stage will make this bacon even better, but you'll be amazed at how good the bacon already tastes. All the excess water has been removed through the dry curing; so the tastes are concentrated...and you'll never see your homemade bacon shrivel away to nothing in the frying pan.

Commercial bacon is pumped full of water, and when you cook it, all this water is released. Adding water is a great way to make more money when you're selling bacon by the pound, but not such a good way to make delicious bacon.

If you decide you want to smoke the bacon, you'll see that's its pretty easy as well. Take a look at my (link below) hub on smoking for easy to follow instructions...using a backyard BBQ!

There's a great thread on the cooking forum at E-Gullet all about charcuterie, so check out their link below if you want to learn more about home curing.

A great book on homemade bacon, sausages, hams, etc. is Michael Rhulman's Charcuterie. People are raving about this easy to follow text on all sorts of different charcuterie. It taught me a lot, and the bacon recipe above is loosely based on one from the book.

F4d04667059bc682540fdfd8b40f13a7

on February 25, 2011
at 12:38 AM

Thanks so much Jon - that looks absolutely great! I know what I'm doing this weekend...

3
C2502365891cbcc8af2d1cf1d7b0e9fc

(2437)

on February 26, 2011
at 01:38 AM

If you're not eating grains, legumes, fructose, vegetable oils etc. you're miles ahead. Just go ahead and enjoy whatever bacon is available.

2
B2dfc2184e3c3956b715645221978d0b

on February 25, 2011
at 11:19 PM

you can use normal large crystal sea salt. is so easy....

1
E075f760b0b32810e4f7073df47324e8

(128)

on February 25, 2011
at 01:48 AM

The Woolies at Menai have free range bacon most of the time for a few dollars more than the regular kind. Also spring hill beef have bacon as well though it is extremely expensive. It does taste better though.

I love those instructions Jon and am going to have to start making my own bacon!

F4d04667059bc682540fdfd8b40f13a7

on February 25, 2011
at 03:11 AM

Thanks Wayne - that's got to be worth a trip!

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