1

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Ever tried RAW BACON?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created March 19, 2011 at 4:23 AM

Anybody ever tried it? I've always wanted to, but "conventional wisdom" seems vehemently opposed to this. Haha, it's pretty funny. If you look it up in google, alot of the "answer" sites have guys saying, "No!!! That will kill you dude!!!"

Maybe it might be a bit too chewy? Does it taste different? Would there be any benefits?

D8195c5ae6c967027a3133d74969d0e1

(543)

on March 20, 2011
at 02:58 PM

I also watched Sheen news inadvertently yes I tried humor - still this shouldn't be here - I assume, like my response this is an elongated joke - but the punch line has lost effect! :)

Medium avatar

(5639)

on March 20, 2011
at 12:50 AM

See this is what I'm talking about! That sounds incredible!

Medium avatar

(5639)

on March 20, 2011
at 12:22 AM

I was intending to poke fun at the "intelligent" answers.

B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on March 19, 2011
at 06:17 PM

I concur with damaged justice. By answering you've made it worthy of an answer, thus, making it a bit paradoxical. And I wouldn't say he needs 'institutional' help, he's merely thinking of thing outside the norm. Surely the first person to 'cook' bacon was going against the grain. (All said with respect, perhaps you were merely trying to be humorous.)

B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on March 19, 2011
at 06:16 PM

I concur with damaged justice. By answering you've made it worthy of an answer, thus, making it a bit paradoxical. And I would say he needs 'institutional' help, he's merely thinking of thing outside the 'norm'. Surely the first person to 'cook' bacon was going against the grain. (All said with respect, perhaps you were merely trying to be humorous.)

9cfa1ab909f6f89544be665d4ef6e3ea

on March 19, 2011
at 04:46 PM

And yet you chose to answer it with an equally value-less non-answer?

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on March 19, 2011
at 02:59 PM

Only if you're in greater Chicago :) It seems to be a pretty small operation.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on March 19, 2011
at 02:17 PM

First, it's not raw, it's cured. Second, the risk of contamination is very low.

D628a7339e8567f7246fc0cf652acacf

(639)

on March 19, 2011
at 02:04 PM

Yeah, that's the same stuff I refer to in my response. Not my cup of tea even freshly sliced. I wouldn't be at all surprised if the grocer I got it from gets it from your smokehouse...

35a8b223ae5d863f17a8c9e3a8eed5eb

(571)

on March 19, 2011
at 10:07 AM

yahoo answers oO c'mon, are you serious!?

8f4ff12a53a98f3b5814cfe242de0daa

(1075)

on March 19, 2011
at 07:45 AM

Bacon is processed ( http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/can-bacon-be-part-of-a-healthy-diet) meat, but not cooked. Wild and farmed are noted to be loaded with Trichinosis https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Trichinosis . Luckily you won't get sick as long as the trich parasites are health enough to function within your immune system.

5514047f3281f61b1139fe6483ae6989

(315)

on March 19, 2011
at 05:04 AM

Unless this is a trolling attempt, if so, well done.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on March 19, 2011
at 04:41 AM

alarmists: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100113195136AAYk7d6

Medium avatar

(5639)

on March 19, 2011
at 04:40 AM

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080908231008AAG775k

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13 Answers

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5
35a8b223ae5d863f17a8c9e3a8eed5eb

(571)

on March 19, 2011
at 10:05 AM

Yes, as a kid I've alway eaten raw Speck (the fatty part of the bacon or belly) from conventional pork at my aunt's. It's pretty common in Germany. At least, it used to be. Unfortunately, my parents put me on grain based, almost meat free diet :(

ever-tried-raw-bacon?

Today i digged into raw pork belly i got from pastured pigs. It's absolutely delicious and the fat really melts on your tongue. I also love eating very fatty cuts from raw wild boar. Apart from that and Ground Beef (steak tartare) i always cook my meat. There is nothing to worry about raw ground pork and Speck in my country. All the butchers know that their customers eat it raw on bread (mostly) :D Just make sure to buy it directly at a sales counter! I may be different for your country and its culture, so just make sure.

Medium avatar

(5639)

on March 20, 2011
at 12:50 AM

See this is what I'm talking about! That sounds incredible!

3
100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on March 19, 2011
at 02:24 PM

As others have pointed out, bacon isn't raw, it's cured. Even so, look at this recent SciAm article (HT Dr. Eades): The Complex Origins of Food Safety Rules--Yes, You Are Overcooking Your Food

Consider the overstated risk of exposure to Trichinella , which has led to ridiculously excessive recommendations for cooking pork. This overkill is just one of many such examples. Cooking standards for chicken, fish, and eggs, as well as rules about raw milk cheeses, all provide examples of inconsistent, excessive, or illogical standards. To a public health official, mandating that pork chops or chicken breasts be dry and overcooked makes sense if it keeps even one person from getting sick. In this calculus, one less case of foodborne illness is worth millions of ruined chops or breasts.

...

The excessive restrictions on cooking pork didn???t come out of nowhere. In decades past, pork was intrinsically less safe than other meats because of muscle infiltration by Trichinella and surface contamination from fecal-borne pathogens like Salmonella and Clostridium perfringens . As a result, people learned to tolerate overcooked pork, and farms raised pigs with increasing amounts of fat???far more fat than is typical in the wild ancestors of pigs such as wild boar. The extra fat helped to keep the meat moist when it was overcooked.

Since then, research has sharpened our understanding of pork-associated pathogens, and producers have vastly reduced the risk of contamination through preventive practices on the farm and in meat-processing facilities. Eventually the FDA relaxed the cooking requirements for pork; they are now no different than those for other meats. The irony is that few people noticed?????culinary professionals and cookbook authors included. Government information aimed at consumers from both the USDA and the FDA continued to promote excessive cooking standards for pork. Amazingly, even pork industry groups continued to do the same thing.

After decades of consuming overcooked pork by necessity, the American public has little appetite for rare pork; it isn???t considered traditional. With a lack of cultural pressure or agitation for change by industry groups, the new standards are largely ignored, and many new publications leave the old cooking recommendations intact.

I don't know where they got the idea of pork getting bred fatter, though. I thought it was the opposite. They do, however, often inject it with water and salt, probably to combat the dryness of overlean animals plus overcooking.

2
B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on March 19, 2011
at 02:50 PM

As the various other commenters have noted, and I will agree, there is a danger of ingesting parasites. If you are dead set on trying it, I would look into the source of your bacon. See how it is processed, where it is processed, and generally does this look like a place free of parasitic pork?

I don't eat anything pork related in the first place (frankly, maybe once a year if at all); I find their physiology so closely related to humans to be a bit unnerving. For example, there are pig heart transplants in humans, dialysis using hogs, and scientists have used them to experiment and gain better knowledge about how various things will affect the human body. That and them pretty much being animal trash cans doesn't sound too appealing. I could share more thoughts from my agriculture class in school ... but sometimes just not to knowing is best and people can continue eating it :). Ignorance is bliss (and I don't mean that in a derogatory manner).

1
D628a7339e8567f7246fc0cf652acacf

on March 19, 2011
at 11:23 AM

Cured bacon actually has been in a 200 degree oven for a fair amount of time, according to the documentary I saw. So it's probably safe, although I wouldn't personally eat it without cooking it. If I wanted to do that, there's a European grocery store in the area with a deli that sells "smoked" bacon, which is pretty close to raw but is intended for consumption without further cooking. I didn't find it to be that great when I tried it.

I don't think it's possible to know for sure that pork is trichinosis free without cutting it into thin enough strips and checking every bit of the interior volume. Current pig farming practices in both the U.S. and Europe make it an extremely rare thing for pigs in those places to have, but given how badly I don't want it, I will not be eating any raw pork.

1
0e4e5882872d6a7c472ea51aec457e66

(1994)

on March 19, 2011
at 07:48 AM

In Germany nobody worries about undercooked porc - and I like to eat seasoned minced porc or bacon raw while cooking... porc tenderloin tastes just as fine raw. Ham or smoked porc belly or Mettwurst or Salami are also raw.

Never had any health problems from this. In the slaughterhouses they test for Trichinella.

1
5514047f3281f61b1139fe6483ae6989

on March 19, 2011
at 05:03 AM

Have you ever seen the show, "Monsters Inside Me?" I'm pretty sure the threat of Trichinosis is enough to keep sensible folks from consuming undercooked pork.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trichinosis

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on March 19, 2011
at 02:17 PM

First, it's not raw, it's cured. Second, the risk of contamination is very low.

5514047f3281f61b1139fe6483ae6989

(315)

on March 19, 2011
at 05:04 AM

Unless this is a trolling attempt, if so, well done.

0
64e8117cb4a16e0222b15c471f9c905f

on February 27, 2013
at 08:14 AM

I ate raw uncured smoked duck bacon today :) yum

0
B05dbb45026079de629182008275c7e4

(0)

on January 08, 2013
at 02:56 PM

Bacon is cured and is delicious raw. Most of my bacon I eat raw while softly frying. As for pork, my family for 3 decades refuse to cook their pork (and everything but chicken or turkey) at best it's rare. Never been sick. I eat raw eggs 5x a week and am healthy.

0
07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on March 19, 2011
at 12:56 PM

At a small smokehouse near my office building in Chicago (creates a little cognitive dissonance) they sell "gypsy bacon" which has been smoked and is OK to serve without further cooking.

When they've sliced it fresh for me, it's been great. It looks and feels raw, but it's not.

I once purchased a pre-sliced, pre-packaged vacuum sealed bag and didn't care for it at all - it got slimy and watery and gross.

07ca188c8dac3a17f629dd87198d2098

(7970)

on March 19, 2011
at 02:59 PM

Only if you're in greater Chicago :) It seems to be a pretty small operation.

D628a7339e8567f7246fc0cf652acacf

(639)

on March 19, 2011
at 02:04 PM

Yeah, that's the same stuff I refer to in my response. Not my cup of tea even freshly sliced. I wouldn't be at all surprised if the grocer I got it from gets it from your smokehouse...

0
344102b6bc599c7c3f1f58ca0ac29513

on March 19, 2011
at 07:24 AM

"Have you ever seen the show, "Monsters Inside Me?" I'm pretty sure the threat of Trichinosis is enough to keep sensible folks from consuming undercooked pork."

Ha, then colour me stupid because I bloody love the stuff and eat it raw all the time. We do have different food standards here in Europe where I live though, so I'm not worried about parasites. And there's this:

http://www.advicegoddess.com/archives/2011/03/18/youre_overcooki.html

8f4ff12a53a98f3b5814cfe242de0daa

(1075)

on March 19, 2011
at 07:45 AM

Bacon is processed ( http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/can-bacon-be-part-of-a-healthy-diet) meat, but not cooked. Wild and farmed are noted to be loaded with Trichinosis https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Trichinosis . Luckily you won't get sick as long as the trich parasites are health enough to function within your immune system.

0
8f4ff12a53a98f3b5814cfe242de0daa

(1075)

on March 19, 2011
at 06:25 AM

Watching the first season 1 episode of house was enough to make me fear undercooked pork. Little parasites living in random places, etc.

0
807ea18498bcc5474b249a184f4d1ad6

on March 19, 2011
at 05:17 AM

I used to eat it raw a lot when I was a kid. However I'd not try it now, unless I was about to starve to death and couldn't find a way to cook it. I do remember it being very chewy and not tasting bad.

-2
D8195c5ae6c967027a3133d74969d0e1

on March 19, 2011
at 03:40 PM

Not worthy of an answer! If you're serious you might consider getting institutional help!

D8195c5ae6c967027a3133d74969d0e1

(543)

on March 20, 2011
at 02:58 PM

I also watched Sheen news inadvertently yes I tried humor - still this shouldn't be here - I assume, like my response this is an elongated joke - but the punch line has lost effect! :)

B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on March 19, 2011
at 06:17 PM

I concur with damaged justice. By answering you've made it worthy of an answer, thus, making it a bit paradoxical. And I wouldn't say he needs 'institutional' help, he's merely thinking of thing outside the norm. Surely the first person to 'cook' bacon was going against the grain. (All said with respect, perhaps you were merely trying to be humorous.)

9cfa1ab909f6f89544be665d4ef6e3ea

on March 19, 2011
at 04:46 PM

And yet you chose to answer it with an equally value-less non-answer?

B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on March 19, 2011
at 06:16 PM

I concur with damaged justice. By answering you've made it worthy of an answer, thus, making it a bit paradoxical. And I would say he needs 'institutional' help, he's merely thinking of thing outside the 'norm'. Surely the first person to 'cook' bacon was going against the grain. (All said with respect, perhaps you were merely trying to be humorous.)

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