1

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Standing 10 hours a day - Back Pain

Answered on September 18, 2015
Created June 01, 2013 at 1:17 AM

Hi Guys,

I'm currently working in a job, traffic controlling, where I basically have to stand in the same location for 9-10 hours a day.

I've read Esther Gokhales book on posture, I've got pretty good shoes, etc but my LOWER back just kills me! Maybe it'll get a little better once my lower back gets used to it.

But any advice out there? Any type of shoes that I should check out? (I'm supposed to wear 'work boots' but a more casual shoe will be fine)

Thanks

43e5b71c58899d8bb5efde54649536ac

(10)

on June 01, 2013
at 06:56 AM

What kind of hip dysfunction could it be? Any resources on how I can fix it?

43e5b71c58899d8bb5efde54649536ac

(10)

on June 01, 2013
at 03:20 AM

I might be able to get a rubber mat. Ill look into it. Thanks fred!

43e5b71c58899d8bb5efde54649536ac

(10)

on June 01, 2013
at 03:20 AM

thanks for your comment snowman! nah, no sort of heel on my boots at the moment. I was stretching/squatting my back out last week while working. I've also been in jobs where I was on my feet all the time but was walking around too and I never had any problems so maybe if I just continually walk up and down a 5-10meter section it might help me out!

43e5b71c58899d8bb5efde54649536ac

(10)

on June 01, 2013
at 01:48 AM

Hi Cherice, The shoes I have at the moment are one of the best workboots (the type of boots worn in a construction site - these are the type I'm expected to wear) out there. I can't wear minimalist shoes in this job. But I can wear some more casual style shoes. I've heard good things about Rockport shoes when standing all day. My back pain is not diet related.

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7 Answers

1
4610451431ec7155c87a5698be682a95

(1122)

on June 01, 2013
at 02:22 AM

Can you stand on a rubber mat? I have to stand a lot so I bought myself a mat like those used in a commercial kitchen or a garage. Pretty cheap. Also, I've heard good things about White's work boots. Have you read anything on The Alexander Technique? Didn't know if it was similar to Gokhale?

43e5b71c58899d8bb5efde54649536ac

(10)

on June 01, 2013
at 03:20 AM

I might be able to get a rubber mat. Ill look into it. Thanks fred!

1
Be803dcde63e3cf5e21cc121097b8158

on June 01, 2013
at 02:06 AM

To be honest, I think it's just too much standing. I've never had lower back problems working jobs where I'm constantly walking and changing my posture. But when I'm standing still in a long queue or during a train commute, my back begins to tighten quite quickly.

Regarding your work boots, do they have any sort of heel? This can be a problem. Try a shoe that's very flat.

Also, try to squat and round out the bottom of your spine whenever you can. At home, you can lie on your back and hug your knee to your chest.

43e5b71c58899d8bb5efde54649536ac

(10)

on June 01, 2013
at 03:20 AM

thanks for your comment snowman! nah, no sort of heel on my boots at the moment. I was stretching/squatting my back out last week while working. I've also been in jobs where I was on my feet all the time but was walking around too and I never had any problems so maybe if I just continually walk up and down a 5-10meter section it might help me out!

1
34f00c7b4e5738cf04ead1a012a14ed1

(996)

on June 01, 2013
at 01:35 AM

What's your definition of "good" shoes? Consider a barefoot style (there are many that look just like typical athletic shoes.)

How paleo are you? I get knee pain when my body is inflamed, for me that's any time I eat something my body doesn't agree with. Perhaps take a look at your diet and see if you can further reduce inflammation?

43e5b71c58899d8bb5efde54649536ac

(10)

on June 01, 2013
at 01:48 AM

Hi Cherice, The shoes I have at the moment are one of the best workboots (the type of boots worn in a construction site - these are the type I'm expected to wear) out there. I can't wear minimalist shoes in this job. But I can wear some more casual style shoes. I've heard good things about Rockport shoes when standing all day. My back pain is not diet related.

0
Ee34c123e09fd8cce2ec7379720acfeb

on September 18, 2015
at 12:53 PM

I'm a nurse and on my feet for over 7.5 hours of my shifts, I ride a bike and walk a dog every day too. Personally I have found great relief for back pain and sciatica from using a neoprene lower back support at work (I was very surprised that my energy levels are far less depleted too!), I also use a Japanese haramaki. Self-massage with some muscle rub while watching TV in bed on my side for 15 mins or more was very useful when dealing with pain along with conventional pain-relief tablets and topical gels. And later I found core strength excercises helpful. You may need to have a break from standing for as much as a month or two, I found I needed 3 weeks holiday to get on top of my back/sciatic pain/periformis syndrome, I also had a few sessions of trigger point acupuncture while on holiday.

0
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on June 02, 2013
at 02:34 PM

An excerpt for you to consider with you back pain: I bet it is related to you dehydration.
Today’s human spine that I operate upon has dramatically changed. The human skeleton has undergone a major overhaul to accommodate walking on two legs. The single arch of the common mammalian spinal column has been completely abandoned in us. Ironically, the only vestige of our past is still found in infants. Human babies are still born with it, but they lose it soon after birth in favor of a perfectly straight spine. It will be straighter as an infant and early toddler than it will ever be again. As soon as they gain control over their cerebellum and cortico-spinal tracts learn to sit up, a forward curve develops near the top of the cervical spine. This lordotic curve is maintained in adults even today. In surgery, my goal is to reestablish that curve when it is lost for many biomechanical reasons.

Our lumbar vertebrae have grown larger in the medial and lateral dimension and in a rostral caudal dimension to be able sustain the unprecedented apical pressure our species now has to bear because of walking erect. Our lumbar discs and ligaments also expanded and had to hydrate massively to help share the loads. It happened so quickly in evolutionary time scales that the annulus around the disc today in modern humans is still only made up of a patch work of fibers that do not even form a compete web to contain the disc well. This implies that optimal hydration of the disc imperative for erect walking painlessly.

This was made possible by many of the hormones made in the pelvis and retroperitoneal space and water from the feet. The pelvic girdle has been moved into a different coronal plane, and the iliac blades on each side of it have spread apart and flattened into a saucer-like shape to hold the main weight of the intestines. These adaptations helped the bipedal mammal from developing a giant prolapse of their gut when it went from a horizontal plane to gravity to a vertical plane to gravity. It also makes a lot of sense why the gut would shorten in humans, as well, compared to other primates. The smaller gut would be a great mechanical advantage to a bipedal creature who was trying to recreate their spine. In fact, it appears embryologic gut rotation maneuvers might be directly tied in a quantum fashion to the changes in the developing spine. How did these changes in the basic mammalian body plan begin? We are primates that evolved around the East African Rift Zone. Re read Brain Gut 3 and 4 to review the details again.

We are designed to walk in seawater absorb it via glands in our feet and excrete the excess salt. On the way up our feet and legs, this water is designed to become coherent in nerves, fascia, and in our lumbar discs to hydrate all the carbon nanotubes to facilitate energy transfer. This is huge in the spinal discs and annulus for a big reason. Discs and the annulus do not have any blood supply so this means they cant energy transfer like other tissues can. It means they rely on water superconduction solely for excellent physiologic function. It is also why back pain is the number one disability in modern humans. Many doctors have wondered why discs do nto have a blood supply. It’s because water is the ticket. This is why they do not have a blood supply……….they rely 100% on coherent water for energy. Without it you get modern man. This is how I make my living. People just do not understand how our body REALLY works. Modern life just blocks you from your real truths.

From here:http://www.jackkruse.com/quantum-biology-6-bipedalism/

0
708f6da6bc041a2e42ed74ed34b1ba43

on June 01, 2013
at 06:49 AM

If your back hurts from just standing, you probably have some hip dysfunction going on causing unwanted loading on your spine

43e5b71c58899d8bb5efde54649536ac

(10)

on June 01, 2013
at 06:56 AM

What kind of hip dysfunction could it be? Any resources on how I can fix it?

0
38f440817bacbbbdc014c5527426e6ba

on June 01, 2013
at 03:33 AM

Definitely second the rubber mat. I've got degenerative disc disease esp. in low back and switching to Paleo & cooking a lot almost drove me to quit. I got mine at bed bath & beyond (they always have 20% off coupons) but you can google "kitchen mat for back pain" too. It's the only way pro chefs manage to stay on their feet all day/night. Good luck!

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