3

votes

Sit at a desk for 9 hours a day at a desk job. Recommendations for burning calories during this time?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 11, 2012 at 2:46 AM

I have a desk job, and my work day total is 9.5 hours. Since I started 2.5 years ago I've gained lower back pain, poor posture, and of course weight.

Any recommendations for burning calories during the day at the desk and keeping good posture to get rid of my back pain?

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on November 12, 2012
at 12:33 AM

This seems to follow the idea that it is best to *let* your muscular support collapse and trust your ergonomic chair to support you properly. While that may reduce pain, it also encourages muscular atrophy - preventing us from building the solid support that one needs for proper posture in the absence of modern technology.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on November 11, 2012
at 10:55 PM

Combine the swopper chair with a sit-standing desk. That's what I do. Not cheap but its a good setup.

Fd7b128cf714044a86d8bd822c7a8992

(4292)

on November 11, 2012
at 11:44 AM

Another vote for the standing desk idea. If your boss doesn't want to pay for it, you can just improvise something (this is what I did - I just put a box on top of my regular desk). Bear in mind that it may be wise to combine this with some kind of gel mat or knee braces (depending on the floor of your office - concrete is super hard on the knees, even if it's covered with carpet) to ensure that your posture-improving solution doesn't wreck your knees.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on November 11, 2012
at 10:37 AM

+1 for movnat in the office. :)

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13 Answers

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4
Ce3e8dba49234f664871518b60f57443

(115)

on November 11, 2012
at 04:39 AM

In the U.S. there are O.S.H.A. regulations regarding ergonomics. Sadly, much of ergonomics is just finding ways to support poor body positioning.

My advice: request a standing desk. There are numerous studies along with anecdotal evidence to support the idea that a standing desk is far superior to a sitting desk. I've been using one for several months now and I am quite happy with it.

If that isn't going to happen, do a little research on Esther Gokhale and her methods to get a good idea of what good posture and body positioning is supposed to actually look like along with how to go about getting your body to transition to the new correct posture (both sitting and standing).

Fd7b128cf714044a86d8bd822c7a8992

(4292)

on November 11, 2012
at 11:44 AM

Another vote for the standing desk idea. If your boss doesn't want to pay for it, you can just improvise something (this is what I did - I just put a box on top of my regular desk). Bear in mind that it may be wise to combine this with some kind of gel mat or knee braces (depending on the floor of your office - concrete is super hard on the knees, even if it's covered with carpet) to ensure that your posture-improving solution doesn't wreck your knees.

3
218f4d92627e4289cc81178fce5b4d00

on November 11, 2012
at 12:01 PM

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/6187080.stm

was reading this theory on BBC about sitting up straight - perhaps its better to slouch!

food for thought

sit-at-a-desk-for-9-hours-a-day-at-a-desk-job.-recommendations-for-burning-calories-during-this-time?

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on November 12, 2012
at 12:33 AM

This seems to follow the idea that it is best to *let* your muscular support collapse and trust your ergonomic chair to support you properly. While that may reduce pain, it also encourages muscular atrophy - preventing us from building the solid support that one needs for proper posture in the absence of modern technology.

2
7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on November 11, 2012
at 01:33 PM

Get a Swopper chair:

http://www.swopper.com/

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on November 11, 2012
at 10:55 PM

Combine the swopper chair with a sit-standing desk. That's what I do. Not cheap but its a good setup.

2
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on November 11, 2012
at 11:00 AM

Every hour get up and perform 10 air squats

1
F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on November 11, 2012
at 05:46 PM

I also sit a lot at work but I don't gain weight. I don't eat more than I'm burning, I bike to work and see a trainer 2-3 times a week. I know sitting is murder on the body but it doesn't have to equal weight gain. Just adjust the rest of your life accordingly.

1
366c23d69eadce094a2b22299c58a424

(2988)

on November 11, 2012
at 12:54 PM

My office conversion cost less than $100 at Amazon: a laptop podium, a back-less tractor stool and a cheap plastic jump rope. The stool allows me to sit at my regular desk but forces me to use my core muscles to hold myself upright, and then I use the podium to spend about half the day standing. If I ever find the need to sit at my desk for longer periods than normal, I try to jump rope for 5-10 minutes every hour or so.

1
Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

on November 11, 2012
at 11:42 AM

Squats, one legged squats, squat jumps, lunges, lunge jumps (are these called something else?), star jumps, push ups of all kinds, burpees, jumping in general, any pilates/yoga type of stuff if you can (if you've got back stuff this may also good to do when not at work...)

These are sort of ameliorative measures, I agree with suggestions to address more systemic things, ie pursue a standing desk if you can/work on maintaining a good posture.

Consider looking on the dietary side too- while immobility etc increases likelihood of weight gain, gaining weight is not a necessary outcome of sitting around.

1
Dc594d9b86218d0a54baf964fd39496c

(594)

on November 11, 2012
at 11:08 AM

IF could help with the burning calories aspect - in an indirect sense

1
2e777bbcd49262eb31a24f821abec6bc

(1974)

on November 11, 2012
at 11:05 AM

When I had a desk job, every hour I would get up and walk around the office then I would do a 3 mile run outside on my lunch break. I would do yoga a couple times a week after work to correct posture. This worked perfectly for me... I never gained weight or back issues etc at that job.

1
7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2030)

on November 11, 2012
at 04:16 AM

Well I guess it would look kinda funny doing some movnat in the office like crawling to the water cooler or lifting the fax machine over your head lol!

I would just suggest getting up and moving around on your breaks, taking a walk on your lunch break if it's possible and taking the stairs if your in an office tower.

Not sure about burning while at your desk though maybe Dr. Ho?

I was kidding about Dr. Ho, please excuse my tomfoolery.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on November 11, 2012
at 10:37 AM

+1 for movnat in the office. :)

0
53b82516ff8a5b4eef99123bde812c3f

on November 12, 2012
at 12:14 AM

I'm in a similar situation, but luckily no weight gain so far. Massage therapy helped my back pain tremendously. I get up and stretch at least every hour. Weather permitting, I take a walk on my lunch break. I bring my lunch and snacks as to not be tempted by food in and around the office.

We're not made to sit at desks all day, but you gotta do what you gotta do to make a living.

0
1963db946ae415764d9044222fbf4c5b

on November 11, 2012
at 10:08 PM

For the back problems, move about, fidget, sitting still for long periods is the biggest problem. Change position often, get up and walk about as often as possible. These exercises are supposed to strengthen the important muscles, so they might help: www.livestrong.com/article/391123-what-are-the-multifidus-back-pain-solution-exercises/

For the weight I'm afraid it's mostly a case of eating less. If you change to a less active lifestyle, you need less food, even on a paleo diet. :-(

0
44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on November 11, 2012
at 06:40 PM

I bought dumb bell weights for work from fleamarket. Cost was about 12 usd. Best money ever spent.

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