2

votes

How to eliminate lower back pain in the mornings?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 27, 2012 at 2:46 PM

I recently developed slight lower back pain. It only happens in the mornings right after I wake up, regardless of my prior day's workout type or lack thereof.

It's just a dull pain, and goes away within a few minutes after stretching and waking up. It feels like it is in the back joints. Although it's not strong pain or debilitating in any way, it's a new phenomenon for me and I'd like to eliminate it.

Is there anything beyond fixing posture and trying out an anti-inflammatory diet I should try? I'll eliminate nightshades for a few weeks to see if that has an impact - something I was planning to test out anyway. I haven't done much milk products in years, none in the last month. I re-introduced sweet potatoes and white rice to my diet recently, which might coincide with the pain, but it looks like they should not be a cause.

Update: I sleep on my stomach, and I tried sleeping on my back based on the recommendations here. It made a huge difference, practically no pain in the morning! I'll continue to investigate dietary and posture improvements, though.

Update 2 one year later: Wow, 14k views. Here update, hope this helps others. My lower back pain is gone. I've made several changes; below a list in highly subjective ranked list of steps I've taken

  • deadlifts with proper form - by far the most prominent and immediate benefit. I did them just once with bad form to make a PR, and it took me two months to recover. Get a personal coach who has done more than a weekend course in training, or book Starting Strength by Mark Rippetoe.
  • stretching (some would call it yoga), especially hamstrings and glutes
  • sleeping on my back or side as mentioned above, instead of stomach
  • following advice from Esther Gokhale's book 8 Steps To A Pain-Free Back on proper posture, sleeping and sitting positions
  • adding bone stock to my diet. I only use it for cooking, so I don't consume much.
  • hot shower and Tiger Balm when things get really bad

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 27, 2013
at 02:28 AM

How many more times are you going to spam this link?

121a16aded2bed8dca492d3c9662ef4c

(1327)

on February 14, 2012
at 12:25 PM

I can only speak from my own experience. I have struggled with similar lower back pain, and magnesium fixed it. Another thing to look at, if you haven't already, is your vitamin D status.

4161a000c1f0f4332476ba43bf385876

(40)

on January 28, 2012
at 07:24 PM

are you pooping regularly? are they well-formed poops indicating you have enough fiber in your diet? you wouldn't think that could cause temporary back pain, but you'd be surprised.

6cdc6b1e75690cfcc4804a6c9eaa910a

(2171)

on January 28, 2012
at 06:04 PM

Wisper, so glad it helped.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 28, 2012
at 01:11 PM

Chiropractors are not quacks. You tried out the suggestion and it helped so where is the quackery in that? A chiro I used to go to told me that the sore, itchy skin on the top of my left ear was gout. It turned out that he was right despite the quackery. lol

1ccc0b0b7a756cd42466cef8f450d0cb

(1801)

on January 28, 2012
at 01:06 PM

In her book "8 Steps to a pain free back", Esther Gokhale details a good back and side-sleeping position. It is not possible to sleep on your stomach with good posture... unless your butt is sticking up in the air. (There are some pictures of babies doing just that in her book that are pretty funny).

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 28, 2012
at 09:53 AM

I don't eat any other grains. I used to have a real futon, so I'm used to sleeping on a semi-hard surface. I'll give it a try.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 28, 2012
at 09:52 AM

Tried sleeping on my back for one night, and it helped! Thank you so much for the tip, Gary :) I updated the question accordingly.

1096aa84d006fe967128ffbd37e8070e

(1002)

on January 27, 2012
at 10:19 PM

Yes, that's right...stomach sleepers usually have worse lowback pain and neck pain. I think you are the age when things really do start to catch up with you (like the position you sleep in, or your gait, or how you sit at work all day) and cause pain. I know those long body pillows can help people sleep comfortably on their sides, but they seem so cumbersome, and it seems like rolling over when you want to change sides would be really hard.

9dd4d453f7ebd7fd2a82814d08fc8f17

(581)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:35 PM

pls remember though, rice is just one of the grains that has lectin (nightshades have them as well) so u might need to eliminate other grains if u'r eating them (especially in packaged foods). and also should put back in some calories to replace. perhaps more potatoes or, most safe, animal fats. in terms of bed, try sleeping on the floor with a few layers of carpet or extra blankets/beddings beneath ur body. i found that when at first switching to a hard surface my heels and my butt took some time to adjust. so if u try the hard-sleeping-surface method, don't be discouraged by that

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:17 PM

I'll eliminate rice for two weeks, since that's the main thing I added in the last month that might be a cause. Soft bed might be a cause, but I live in a rental and don't really have a choice of bed in the short term.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:07 PM

Oh, and it's amazing for better sleep.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:07 PM

Been taking ZMA for years and years, which includes Magnesium (from Citrate and Oxide): 450mg per serving.

05055dcbf12c81f1cce777ec365870af

(1791)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:00 PM

magnesium is deficient in may diets, most of us probably need 500mg supplementally a day. it helps bowel movements, gut dysbiosis also contribute to low back pain, and helps relax the system - deeper sleep, less pain.

4d6aa1a676240b15dc569ff8ade0500f

(2546)

on January 27, 2012
at 07:58 PM

that's how i woke up one day and because i was active and never had problems like that, i didn't do anything right away, i ended up in horrible pain for 7 months, basically immobile for 3. physical therapy did nothing. massage & acupuncture did nothing. the only thing that helped was a kick-ass chiropractor, who had me back at 75% within two sessions. see someone asap -- those were the most awful 7 months of my life.

B525b3e4b1d6f1cdceec943cdec6eb7d

(1680)

on January 27, 2012
at 07:18 PM

Interesting! Why magnesium?

1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on January 27, 2012
at 04:49 PM

WELL then maybe you kidneys are going to explode...

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 27, 2012
at 04:25 PM

You might be on to something. I added stiff-legged deadlifts back to my workout recently. I do stretch my hams, but I'll increase the intensity and frequency.

6cdc6b1e75690cfcc4804a6c9eaa910a

(2171)

on January 27, 2012
at 04:24 PM

In that case I'd go for trying to train yourself out of sleeping on your stomach as a first step.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 27, 2012
at 03:45 PM

If by front sleeper you mean sleeping on my stomach, yes, I am. I'm 37. I definitely consider chiros to be quacks.

1096aa84d006fe967128ffbd37e8070e

(1002)

on January 27, 2012
at 03:11 PM

Same with everyone else I talk to about this...same bed, aging body :)

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 27, 2012
at 03:08 PM

Again, I haven't changed any of my habits so this shouldn't be it - unless my bad posture is finally catching up to me...

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 27, 2012
at 02:57 PM

I've heard of that, but the dull pain is new, and I'm sleeping in the same bed as always. Worth trying, nevertheless.

1096aa84d006fe967128ffbd37e8070e

(1002)

on January 27, 2012
at 02:55 PM

...and you can buy one at a physical therapy supply store, like this: http://www.optp.com/

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24 Answers

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2
6cdc6b1e75690cfcc4804a6c9eaa910a

(2171)

on January 27, 2012
at 03:29 PM

I have similar issues.

I agree with the other answer re sleep position. I saw a chiropractor about my pain and he suggests such issues often arise from "front sleepers"...are you one? Side and back sleepers tend to have less issues. The pillow between the knees can help you to stay on your side and not roll onto your front during the night.

Chiro can also help with any neck or back alignment issues. I sit a lot (office/car) and quite a bit of realignment was necessary for me over a number of weeks. Now much better and although I did think chiro's were "quacks" before I went, I am now convinced.

As an aside I also have a degenerative problem with a disc in my lower back that sleep position and realignment can do less about. Advice there is to build strong core muscles...and I'm hoping that my Paleo diet will also help in general with connective tissue problems, as seems to be evidenced by many Paleos. I really hope you don't have something similar. Again, the chiro (together with video x-rays) helped my identify the issue here. Seems to be largely age related..of course I'm not going to ask your age (would be rude!)...but I am mid-40's and it's just the last year or so it's struck me...

1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on January 27, 2012
at 04:49 PM

WELL then maybe you kidneys are going to explode...

6cdc6b1e75690cfcc4804a6c9eaa910a

(2171)

on January 27, 2012
at 04:24 PM

In that case I'd go for trying to train yourself out of sleeping on your stomach as a first step.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 27, 2012
at 03:45 PM

If by front sleeper you mean sleeping on my stomach, yes, I am. I'm 37. I definitely consider chiros to be quacks.

1096aa84d006fe967128ffbd37e8070e

(1002)

on January 27, 2012
at 10:19 PM

Yes, that's right...stomach sleepers usually have worse lowback pain and neck pain. I think you are the age when things really do start to catch up with you (like the position you sleep in, or your gait, or how you sit at work all day) and cause pain. I know those long body pillows can help people sleep comfortably on their sides, but they seem so cumbersome, and it seems like rolling over when you want to change sides would be really hard.

6cdc6b1e75690cfcc4804a6c9eaa910a

(2171)

on January 28, 2012
at 06:04 PM

Wisper, so glad it helped.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 28, 2012
at 09:52 AM

Tried sleeping on my back for one night, and it helped! Thank you so much for the tip, Gary :) I updated the question accordingly.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 28, 2012
at 01:11 PM

Chiropractors are not quacks. You tried out the suggestion and it helped so where is the quackery in that? A chiro I used to go to told me that the sore, itchy skin on the top of my left ear was gout. It turned out that he was right despite the quackery. lol

1ccc0b0b7a756cd42466cef8f450d0cb

(1801)

on January 28, 2012
at 01:06 PM

In her book "8 Steps to a pain free back", Esther Gokhale details a good back and side-sleeping position. It is not possible to sleep on your stomach with good posture... unless your butt is sticking up in the air. (There are some pictures of babies doing just that in her book that are pretty funny).

3
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on January 27, 2012
at 03:50 PM

Hamstrings, hamstrings, hamstrings

I had similar experiences throughout my life, especially working a sedentary job and having to remain seated for a long period of time.

I found my hamstrings were very tight from all this sitting, and by doing things such as stretching, toe touches, and making sure I can lock my knees and touch my toes. Once I greatly improved my hamstrings flexibility, my early morning low back pain went away.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 27, 2012
at 04:25 PM

You might be on to something. I added stiff-legged deadlifts back to my workout recently. I do stretch my hams, but I'll increase the intensity and frequency.

2
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on February 11, 2013
at 11:44 PM

There is a lot of back pain info in this blog I wrote. I do a lot of this for my spine patients. Iodine, DHA, Cu, Zn, Mg, Fe are massively important for LBP

http://www.jackkruse.com/brain-gut-17-the-power-squat/

2
B1076248dde479773e75044818e1878c

(458)

on January 28, 2012
at 02:22 PM

After you try all of these comments and still have back pain, you definitely want to get X-rays or an MRI to determine if it is mechanical. If nothing shows up, it could very well be an inflammatory/rheumatic condition. I have ankylosing spondylitis, and it causes mild to severe pain anywhere along the spine. It can definitely be improved with a strict autoimmune paleo protocol (no nuts, nightshades, egg whites, starch, dairy, etc.) and supplements such as fish oil, turmeric, and a milder drug called LDN (do NOT take Humira or NSAIDs - destroyed my intestinal lining!). Other signs (varies in spondy patients) - gastric reflux? digestive issues? fatigue? eye pain or blurring around edges? feet/heel pain? pain better after stretching or rising? http://www.spondylitis.org/

I like to advocate for this condition because many people go 5-10 years without knowing what is causing their pain. I just told a friend about this condition, and she went straight to a rheumatologist after getting the run around for over a year, and she had a confirmed case. It's important to get diagnosed so you know how to treat it correctly. Otherwise, the inflammation can lead to permanent damage if you leave it unchecked!

2
121a16aded2bed8dca492d3c9662ef4c

on January 27, 2012
at 06:56 PM

Before you try any of these other suggestions, do this one thing:

Supplement with magnesium. Try at least 350 mg/d, for at least three days.

Do that, and then tell us what happens.

B525b3e4b1d6f1cdceec943cdec6eb7d

(1680)

on January 27, 2012
at 07:18 PM

Interesting! Why magnesium?

05055dcbf12c81f1cce777ec365870af

(1791)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:00 PM

magnesium is deficient in may diets, most of us probably need 500mg supplementally a day. it helps bowel movements, gut dysbiosis also contribute to low back pain, and helps relax the system - deeper sleep, less pain.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:07 PM

Been taking ZMA for years and years, which includes Magnesium (from Citrate and Oxide): 450mg per serving.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:07 PM

Oh, and it's amazing for better sleep.

121a16aded2bed8dca492d3c9662ef4c

(1327)

on February 14, 2012
at 12:25 PM

I can only speak from my own experience. I have struggled with similar lower back pain, and magnesium fixed it. Another thing to look at, if you haven't already, is your vitamin D status.

1
F7a71561177182ce9f04fe21856b6626

on May 18, 2013
at 01:18 PM

I had exactly the same symptoms. Sore back every morning, regardless of what bed / mattress / sleeping position (slightly worse on my back). After a few hours and a hot shower, it eased off almost completely.

Went to a new physio. The problem was my feet! Turns out that if you lose your arches (by turning slightly over on your foot), then it puts a strain on your back as you walk. Then at night, the overused muscles in your back stiffen up leading to pain. In the morning, you ease them off again, but as your walking is the problem, the sore back never goes away.

The solution was to buy some "orthotics". Yup, I'd never heard of it either. Turns out these are hard insoles that create the ball in my feet that is missing. You just put them in your shoes and walk around. Feels a bit like walking with some newspaper under your sole, but it changes the foot angle, and therefore the angle of the knee, hip and avoids the inappropriate gait.

I've only been wearing them for a few days, but I'm feeling slight improvement in the morning. So I'm hopeful that this could be the answer. Who'd have thought!

1
3ea197be64b7a89976ea515879b88caf

on May 05, 2013
at 07:24 AM

Hi everyone. I am the 2005 over 50 years old US National Champion in natural body building (The Yorton Cup). I had lower back pain for years and was told by my surgeon that it would never go away unless I had surgery on the vertebrae. What I had since learned is that doing dead lifts will do two remarkable things: 1) it will strengthen the muscles that support your lower back, and 2) as the lower back muscles grow stronger, they will grow bigger. When they grow bigger they have to have room because things get crowded where they connect to your vertebrae. What happens is that these stronger and larger lower back muscles slowly and naturally exert forces on the vertebrae along the lower back so that the vertebrae begin to separate from each other and relieve the pressure exerted from the weight of the upper body. This is the best way to counteract the aging effects of gravity on ouir bodies. The deadlifts must be done with no weight at first, keeping your knees only slightly bent to relieve stress on your hamstrings and lower vertebrae. As your back muscles begin to strengthen, add small amounts of weight. Always take a day or two off to allow the back muscles to recover and then repeat the exercise. Work up to three sets, and to adding enough weight to equal half of your body weight. Always aim at 12 to 15 reps. The deadlifts will also serve to stretch your hamstrings, which will also relieve lower back pressure.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 28, 2012
at 01:21 PM

My back was as stiff as a board in the mornings. I used to have to lay in a few centremetres of very hot water every morning to try to loosen up enough to get ready for work.
I got myself tested and was found to have a klebsiella problem. The klebsiella feed off starches (including those in bananas) and can cause problems in the joints of the spine.

If you are doing a lot more sitting than usual or using a different chair then these can also aggravate your back. Crossing your legs can also aggravete the lower back but you may not feel it at the time.

1
22fd82abf435768244f8d074430cd1e6

(590)

on January 28, 2012
at 10:18 AM

I had the same issue in the past, and it came back just a few weeks ago.

The ideal sleep position for this kind of pain is to sleep on your back, with a big pillow, or a towel and a pillow underneath your knees, in a way to keep your legs bent and reduce the load on your lower back.

Most likely sleeping is making your pain worse, but it isn't the real cause.

1
9dd4d453f7ebd7fd2a82814d08fc8f17

on January 27, 2012
at 06:25 PM

i used to wake up with really bad back pain too. eliminating nightshades is a start but eliminating rice and all grains is a good idea. when i cut out those stuff i felt much better. sometimes the lectin in grains end up passing ur intestinal wall and into ur blood. if they end up at ur joints then is joint pain.

the other thing that helped alot for me is not sleeping on a soft bed. in my opinion and personal experience, soft beds might not work for some people. our spine developed through evolution without anywhere too soft to sleep on (i'm guessing some hay and leaves and animal skin at best) and so it's safe to assume that when we lay down we r supposed to lay on a semi-hard surface. the tumperpedic (spelling) bed people say that their (soft) beds retain the spine's natural curve and angles while u sleep - the natural curve and angles that ur spine has when standing. but when we r standing, gravity pulls down toward our feet, so every single joint in the spine is stacked on top of each other for support. when we lay down, gravity pulls outward from our back away from the spine/joints. if the bed is too soft and the joints aren't supported by stacking on each other like while standing, then the joints can be pulled ever slightly apart during the night. after i switched to a hard bed, my back joints were completely pain/tightness free. a hard bed would still give ur lower spine a bit of natural curve while sleeping because it's like a bridge built on hard surface where each end of the bridge (lower spine) is supported and so the curve (lower back joints) is supported.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:17 PM

I'll eliminate rice for two weeks, since that's the main thing I added in the last month that might be a cause. Soft bed might be a cause, but I live in a rental and don't really have a choice of bed in the short term.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 28, 2012
at 09:53 AM

I don't eat any other grains. I used to have a real futon, so I'm used to sleeping on a semi-hard surface. I'll give it a try.

9dd4d453f7ebd7fd2a82814d08fc8f17

(581)

on January 27, 2012
at 08:35 PM

pls remember though, rice is just one of the grains that has lectin (nightshades have them as well) so u might need to eliminate other grains if u'r eating them (especially in packaged foods). and also should put back in some calories to replace. perhaps more potatoes or, most safe, animal fats. in terms of bed, try sleeping on the floor with a few layers of carpet or extra blankets/beddings beneath ur body. i found that when at first switching to a hard surface my heels and my butt took some time to adjust. so if u try the hard-sleeping-surface method, don't be discouraged by that

1
5e5ff249c9161b8cd96d7eff6043bc3a

(4713)

on January 27, 2012
at 03:55 PM

Acupuncture worked better for me than anything, even after trying all kinds of sleeping positions, stretches, physical therapists, and buying a Tempur-Pedic Cloud (which is all kinds of amazing now that I can fully appreciate it after getting this sorted haha).

1
Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on January 27, 2012
at 03:07 PM

One thing I have found to help with my pain is to stand at my desk. A lot of days I go from sleeping straight to sitting at my desk. Standing allows the muscles in my back to relax, whether at my desk or at the stove. It helps my knees too.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 27, 2012
at 03:08 PM

Again, I haven't changed any of my habits so this shouldn't be it - unless my bad posture is finally catching up to me...

1
1096aa84d006fe967128ffbd37e8070e

(1002)

on January 27, 2012
at 02:53 PM

I know that one thing physical therapists recommend is to sleep with a small pillow between your legs. It helps keep your pelvis and hips in alignment and can really help morning pain. It can be a bother to keep setting it up again after you roll over, so they actually sell pillows with a velcro strap to wrap around your legs. I know lots of people that swear by this.

1096aa84d006fe967128ffbd37e8070e

(1002)

on January 27, 2012
at 02:55 PM

...and you can buy one at a physical therapy supply store, like this: http://www.optp.com/

1096aa84d006fe967128ffbd37e8070e

(1002)

on January 27, 2012
at 03:11 PM

Same with everyone else I talk to about this...same bed, aging body :)

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 27, 2012
at 02:57 PM

I've heard of that, but the dull pain is new, and I'm sleeping in the same bed as always. Worth trying, nevertheless.

0
D09862c8fb82e6a8234d94ccc00282bf

on August 01, 2013
at 01:52 AM

All this is fine, but my back hurts on the right side. I sleep with a pillow, knee raise, have my vits, etc etc..... But cant find a solution to the pain ifeel every morning from right shoulder to waist, from spine lenght to rib sides Need Help...

0
F551fe3cc390b9b4302cced1200852b6

on February 24, 2013
at 03:54 PM

Sleep on higher pillow and stretching in the morning

0
44d244d6254dc133df6234cfb616a7d1

on January 27, 2013
at 01:10 AM

aspirin with vitamin K of course

0
D628f729ce1601bd5c93c7acd3546132

on January 02, 2013
at 08:59 PM

I think you will find it is not muscular or skeletal. Get checked for kidney disease, diabetes and liver damage. Remove sugar and alcohol from your diet completely until you have the results.

0
6fece842bd1bcf5724f458a302a2156e

on November 30, 2012
at 06:03 PM

I have a bit too and I am pretty sure it relates to weight. 30 excess pounds my poor body has to support. I do find that sitting at my desk in a half lotus position helps - I never sit on chairs like other people do which makes going on planes hard for me. Yoga might help you too - I like bikram yoga.

0
1eeb8eb0cb9b49567a71ef51a987db13

on November 30, 2012
at 05:56 PM

I've been having the morning lower back pain for years and thank god I've found a workaround - sleep on your back AND most importantly stuff something under your mattress where you have your knees and your head - to create a wave like shape that helps relieve your m. psoas, the muscle that most likely causes your pain. A more expensive solution is a special bed shaped like this (http://www.amazon.de/Lattenrost-Evolution-Motor-100x200-cm/dp/B006WL87OM) but the stuffing under your mattress works good too. In my case 10 inches under my knees and 10 inches under my head work fine.

0
10f02b91a9d5a8b010b891cea7e8521a

on November 10, 2012
at 02:40 AM

I can hardly crawl out of bed in the morning. I squat down to pick up the newspaper rather than bend. After sitting on a hard chair, drinking coffee and reading the newspaper, I am able to get about. At night I sit on a wood seat and my back does not hurt.

0
6d7f3c1a99bba0541d4bf2b34662c1b8

(0)

on August 26, 2012
at 10:34 AM

I started waking up with lower back pain recently as well, and I thought at first it was from eating too much before bed. I'm about 85% (was, anyways) vegetarian and soon I discovered that if I eat meat the day before, then I will wake up with back pain. If I don't eat meat, it doesn't happen. I don't know what the cause is, perhaps a lack of a certain gut flora or too much of an unhealthy flora that lives off meat? I don't know. But not that big a loss, really. I'd like to stop eating meat anyways, because I don't think humans are natural meat eaters ever since I read this website, and it often makes my metabolism feel sluggish and slow. Here's a website to support that claim if you are worried about trying to be vegetarian: http://michaelbluejay.com/veg/natural.html Also, I haven't eaten red meat since I was about 10, because I just didn't like chewing on the fat in it. I also had a recent blood test for a physical exam where my thyroid, lipids, etc. were tested, and my doctor was very surprised because he had not seen someone who had completely normal results across the board in such a long time. So I am otherwise in perfect metabolic health, as he has told me. Anyways, hopefully this is helpful to someone else out there. And if you do have some idea what's going on with me, why meat (white meat, really) is giving me lower back pain, please let me know. I am in the process of researching it right now. I'd like to be able to eat meat if I needed to, so I am concerned and would like to correct the issue (although being vegetarian sounds appealing to me anyways). While I'm at it, I do want to share some more information about gut flora that I stumbled across, in regards to gut flora and the effect it has on psychology, causing many psychological issues, including autism. This is the reason vaccines may trigger autism but can't be statistically correlated to it, because the vaccine is just the straw that breaks the camel's back - it is really about the gut flora. There are really tons of things that are bad for gut flora, and gut flora can be replenished with the proper diet. One thing that's really bad for gut flora is Nutrasweet, or is it Splenda?... the Monsanto zero calorie sugar that took them 30 years of lobbying the FDA to approve (research it). Really, everything that maintains our health through nutrition in our food has to pass through our digestion system in order to be assimilated by our body, which is entirely dependent upon millions of probiotics that have separate DNA than our own. If they are not functioning properly, neither will our bodies, because there is no way anything we put in our bodies can reach our cells. This should be CRUX of the medical discipline... instead it is never mentioned. Listen to this Doctor's interview, it makes sense: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2011/07/31/dr-natasha-campbell-mcbride-on-gaps-nutritional-program.aspx What really convinced me of the psychology-gut flora connection was my experience in care taking for elderly horses. If you don't know about horses, they can colic (different than a baby's colic), which basically means they stop eating, drinking, defecating, and just die. It's can happen for many reasons, an organ failure, a twist in their intestines, a toxin or foreign object that they ate. The point is that this work with horses showed me that there is a response in the gut/immune system that is like an ON/OFF switch, and can just turn off certain brain functions and processes. I have also worked with autistic children, and before I heard of GAPS (listened to the interview above), this was the closest thing I could relate to what autistic children are experiencing. It makes too much sense for me to deny at this point, I truly believe this.

0
1d952d225819b0229e93160a90bf9bf8

on January 28, 2012
at 01:37 PM

My back decided to lock almost completely(in the middle of a third shift at work,great timing).Spent three days in incredible pain until putting some of the other symptoms together(ringing ears and numbness in hands) made me realize I was suffering a B12 shortage.Two pills,I was out dancing that night.Amazing how simple it can be sometimes :)

0
B525b3e4b1d6f1cdceec943cdec6eb7d

(1680)

on January 27, 2012
at 07:17 PM

I told my chiropractor that my back was often stiff upon waking in the morning. After checking me out, he gave me an exercise to do that helps a lot. (Google PSOAS stretches if you're interested.) My problem might not be your problem, but getting a chiropractor to look you over and suggest an exercise or two might help.

-2
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 27, 2013
at 01:09 AM

I'm making a video series on it here.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on January 27, 2013
at 02:28 AM

How many more times are you going to spam this link?

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