5

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Best commercially available baby/infant formula

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 20, 2012 at 8:59 AM

Paleo is not about re-enactment. Paleo is about making informed choices in a modern world.

What commercially available brand (available in Europe/Belgium) of baby/infant formula would you give to your child. Or which one certainly not. And why?

The mother would still be giving a few feedings (from breast) in morning and evening, but in the daycare centre they need formula.

Thank you.

D1728f99db66ff91d695a6df5cd38b02

(1368)

on March 20, 2012
at 07:42 PM

I feel bad for the situation you are in, and plan on getting out of USA to have children.

35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on March 20, 2012
at 06:53 PM

I think twins are definitely one of those situations where a HG mother would probably engage in cross-nursing.

Bdede2dbc411f2533a7e6f13674ade51

(804)

on March 20, 2012
at 04:51 PM

My wife and I have talked about that often. Not so long ago, this would have been possible even in the good 'ol USofA. I just wish we were able to take advantage of the liberal leave policy that Germany, and much of Europe, has for new mothers. My wife has had to fight her company tooth and nail just to take two months away from work, hardly any of it paid. In Germany, 1 to 2 years is common with a guaranteed return to previous employment.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on March 20, 2012
at 03:21 PM

In most other cultures, there would likely be other nursing mothers who would be able to nurse another woman's infant on occasion, especially if she were running low on milk. Sharing breast milk would no doubt boost an infant's immune system as well. Since we don't practice that here in the West, feeding a good formula is the only logical choice.

Fb677d93955eb0fac597e3d94db92980

(1115)

on March 20, 2012
at 11:52 AM

Just out of curiosity, will the daycare center accept frozen/refrigerated expressed milk? I'm not anti-formula. If that's what you choose to do/have to do, so be it. But expressed milk is the best both financially and nutritionally. Though it is a PITA to find/take the time to pump every few hours while working full time. But it's a sacrifice lots of women make.

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4 Answers

4
Bdede2dbc411f2533a7e6f13674ade51

(804)

on March 20, 2012
at 10:49 AM

"Paleo is not about re-enactment. Paleo is about making informed choices in a modern world."

Well said, and I whole-heartedly agree.

The best we've found is the Hipp Organic formula. I spent more than an hour in our local Edeka reading ingredients on numerous formula packages. It had the least amount of bad stuff in it. My wife hasn't been able to produce enough milk for our rapidly growing twin girls (7 weeks as of yesterday), so we had to bite the bullet and find some formula. We are feeding them the the Hipp Bio Combiotik 'Pre' formula right now.

( http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.hipp.de%2Fmilchnahrung%2Fprodukte%2Fhipp-bio-combiotikR%2F)

I know some Paleo people are totally against it, but you need to do what is best for you and your family. We didn't want to feed our girls formula at all, but we really had no other choice. Being an American living in Germany, trying to track down all of the ingredients to make the Weston Price formula has proven to be very, very difficult, especially in the ass-backwards region we live in. However, we both strictly adhere to the dietary portion of 'Paleo' (more Archevore Kurt Harris if we must label it), so our girls are getting some good breast milk for at least 1/2 of their meals. We have actually seen little to no difference when they are fed the Hipp formula vs. the breast milk.

I'm thinking you should be able to find this in Belgium quite easily. If you do happen to find anything better, please, let me know!

35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on March 20, 2012
at 06:53 PM

I think twins are definitely one of those situations where a HG mother would probably engage in cross-nursing.

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on March 20, 2012
at 03:21 PM

In most other cultures, there would likely be other nursing mothers who would be able to nurse another woman's infant on occasion, especially if she were running low on milk. Sharing breast milk would no doubt boost an infant's immune system as well. Since we don't practice that here in the West, feeding a good formula is the only logical choice.

Bdede2dbc411f2533a7e6f13674ade51

(804)

on March 20, 2012
at 04:51 PM

My wife and I have talked about that often. Not so long ago, this would have been possible even in the good 'ol USofA. I just wish we were able to take advantage of the liberal leave policy that Germany, and much of Europe, has for new mothers. My wife has had to fight her company tooth and nail just to take two months away from work, hardly any of it paid. In Germany, 1 to 2 years is common with a guaranteed return to previous employment.

2
5fbdb4d1266cfbd9dd36b4c219bbdb96

on March 20, 2012
at 03:14 PM

My daughter was almost exclusively breastfed/received pumped milk, but there were times she needed some formula supplementation at daycare if I did not have enough pumped milk available. In researching the best product for her, I settled on Nature's One Organic formula and was happy with it.

http://www.naturesone.com/dairy/

Most daycares should take pumped milk if you do the bottle preparation for them. If it is not part of their policy, you can request your pediatrician write a note, and most daycares should view it as an dietary exception and allow breastmilk.

I would recommend having backup formula just in case they run out of breastmilk on a particularly hungry day, but overall, pumped milk should work for daycares.

2
B8592e62f9804ddabae73c1103d6bcb9

(1956)

on March 20, 2012
at 12:24 PM

Take a look at this: http://www.westonaprice.org/childrens-health/recipes-for-homemade-baby-formula#fcf

Basically WAPF recommends adding cod liver oil and egg yolks to commercial formulas.

1
99bd7f8b1170a1e9e56b93d9d53b51cc

(193)

on March 20, 2012
at 02:09 PM

I've just been faced with the same question myself, and after much research have found that either raw goats milk, made in a home-made formula below, or Nanny Care goats milk formula (http://www.vitacare.co.uk/) to be the best option. Goats milk is the closest thing to human breastmilk in its nutritional make-up, but you can also use raw cows milk to create the home-made formula.

Homemade Milk Based
Simple version:
Makes approx 500ml

Ingredients
2 cups whole, raw milk
1 cup filtered water or coconut water
1/4 cup liquid whey
1/4 tsp BifidoBacT probiotic (http://naturaldispensary.co.uk/products/Bio_BifidoBacT_75g-3695-181.html)
1/4 tsp2 caps Saccharomyces Bouladii probiotic (http://naturaldispensary.co.uk/products/Saccharomyces_Boulardii_50s-4295-200.html)
2 TBL good quality cream, raw if possible
1/2 tsp unflavored, fermented cod liver oil
1 tsp organic sunflower oil or hemp
1 tsp organic, extra virgin olive oil
2 tsp virgin coconut oil

Optional:
1/4 tsp high vitamin butter oil
2 tsp gelatin
2 tsp Kefir
1/4 tsp vitamin C powder

Instructions
Pour about half the water into a pan and put on low heat. Add the gelatin if used and let dissolve, stirring occasionally. When gelatin dissolved, remove pan from heat and add the rest of the water to cool. Stir in the coconut oil and butter oil until melted. Put remaining ingredients in a glass blender. Add the water mixture and blend for about 3 seconds. Place formula in glass bottles or a glass jar and refrigerate.

We have decided to go with the Nanny Care formula mixed with breastmilk.

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