5

votes

Looking for the right article/book for MS & Diet for my wife

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created November 10, 2011 at 5:12 PM

My wife has relapsing-remitting MS and is looking for a good resource out there to use to figure out how she needs to change her diet. There are a lot out there and they all seem to advocate slightly different things. She's overwhelmed by the choices and I'm trying to whittle them down a bit.

Background: Her MS is fairly advanced (lesions on both brain and spinal cord), but it is under control with Gilenya. If possible, I need something that's not going to bury her in science and put her to sleep. She'll never make it through the book.

THANKS!!!

1145a340276b66b7765d7808128062ea

(80)

on November 21, 2011
at 01:34 PM

Great post. This idea of a leaky gut is so close to mainstream that scientifica american did an article on it a few years back. The article focused on celiac disease/gluten sensitivity, but did clearly state this could apply to other autoimmune diseases. http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=celiac-disease-insights

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on November 16, 2011
at 05:08 PM

You are most welcome James!

Ab55ad7b980f6a8c94984aa6e23b25b4

(25)

on November 16, 2011
at 04:52 PM

She takes Vitamin D during the winter, but I'm thinking it should probably be year round...possibly in higher doses.

Ab55ad7b980f6a8c94984aa6e23b25b4

(25)

on November 16, 2011
at 04:49 PM

Awesome. Ther are great resources here for her. Thanks Eric.

Ef31d612a661d9fcb19c8965d3a2bd12

(533)

on November 11, 2011
at 08:37 PM

Also if you post specific comments to Paul, he will help you tailor the diet.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on November 11, 2011
at 06:46 AM

I have updated my answer with the links

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on November 11, 2011
at 06:44 AM

I have edited my answer with the link :-)

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on November 11, 2011
at 01:51 AM

Good point. I forgot about this. I do supplement with D... 2000-4000 IU during the summer, and 6000-8000 during the winter in gulf coast Texas. D levels went from 35ng to 68ng.

Ab55ad7b980f6a8c94984aa6e23b25b4

(25)

on November 10, 2011
at 10:06 PM

I know that he has some stuff out there and I've searched his site, but haven't found what you're talking about. I'll do some more digging.

Ab55ad7b980f6a8c94984aa6e23b25b4

(25)

on November 10, 2011
at 10:04 PM

And you as well. Thanks for the detailed account. I'll have to pass this on to her.

Ab55ad7b980f6a8c94984aa6e23b25b4

(25)

on November 10, 2011
at 10:01 PM

That sounds good. I've heard of that and will have to check it out.

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6 Answers

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6
Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on November 10, 2011
at 05:54 PM

I'm nobody's expert -- but I seem to have slowed the progression of my own MS by going grain-free and increasing my fat levels to up over 50% of daily calories, with 90+ percent of those from saturated sources, as well as improving my mobility substantially (especially when I switched from regular shoes to Vibram FiveFingers -- resolved a lot of my balance problems). I'm Remitting/Progressing, 26 years post-diagnosis:

Areas of improvement:

  • Balance (~75% of normal, major improvement)-
  • Short term memory (~25% of normal, minor improvement)-
  • spasticity (1-3 small episodes daily, major improvement)-
  • general mobility (90% mobility, major improvement)-
  • small muscle coordination (70% of average for age, major improvement) General strength (120% of average for age - major improvement)-

Areas that haven't changed much:

  • intestinal and bladder motility (still slower than 90% of peers)
  • inflammatory neuralgia (still worse than 100% of peers)-

I'm going to try getting rid of nightshades (imagine - a Sicilian without tomatoes and peppers... sigh) for a few months to see if I get any general improvement or any specific improvement in the areas that are still sorta sucky.

I still see my neurologist regularly, but changed to a holistic neurologist so I'd be able to experiment with myself without having to go behind my doctor's back.

MS is a real challenge. My thoughts are with you.-----

Ab55ad7b980f6a8c94984aa6e23b25b4

(25)

on November 10, 2011
at 10:04 PM

And you as well. Thanks for the detailed account. I'll have to pass this on to her.

best answer

3
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on November 10, 2011
at 05:41 PM

Look up Rob Wolf autoimmune. There is a six part video series he links to. Also see:

http://paleohacks.com/questions/29067/has-anyone-tried-robb-wolfs-autoimmune-gut-irritation-protocol#axzz1dKEJGC1p

EDIT:

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x59iwc_the-paleo-diet-and-multiple-scleros_lifestyle

http://robbwolf.com/faq/

Autoimmunity

Autoimmunity is a process in which our bodies own immune system attacks ???us.??? Normally the immune system protects us from bacterial, viral, and parasitic infections. The immune system identifies a foreign invader, attacks it, and ideally clears the infection. A good analogy for autoimmunity is the case of tissue rejection after organ donation. If someone requires a new heart, lung kidney or liver due to disease or injury, a donor organ may be an option. The first step in this process is trying to find a tissue ???match???. All of us have molecules in our tissues that our immune system uses to recognize self from non-self. If a donated organ is not close enough to the recipient in tissue type the immune system will attack and destroy the organ. In autoimmunity, a similar process occurs in that an individuals own tissue is confused as something foreign and the immune system attacks this ???mislabeled??? tissue. Common forms of autoimmunity include Multiple Sclerosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus, and Vitiligo to name only a tiny fraction of autoimmune diseases. Elements of autoimmunity are likely at play in conditions as seemingly unrelated as Schizophrenia, infertility, and various forms of cancer. Interestingly, all of these seemingly unrelated diseases share a common cause: damage to the intestinal lining which allows large, undigested food particles to make their way into the body. This is called ???leaky gut and the autoimmune response???. Here is a 7-part video series by Prof. Loren Cordain describing the etiology of Multiple Sclerosis. Keep in mind, this is the same process which underlies ALL autoimmune disease.

Ab55ad7b980f6a8c94984aa6e23b25b4

(25)

on November 10, 2011
at 10:06 PM

I know that he has some stuff out there and I've searched his site, but haven't found what you're talking about. I'll do some more digging.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on November 11, 2011
at 06:44 AM

I have edited my answer with the link :-)

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on November 11, 2011
at 06:46 AM

I have updated my answer with the links

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on November 16, 2011
at 05:08 PM

You are most welcome James!

Ab55ad7b980f6a8c94984aa6e23b25b4

(25)

on November 16, 2011
at 04:49 PM

Awesome. Ther are great resources here for her. Thanks Eric.

1145a340276b66b7765d7808128062ea

(80)

on November 21, 2011
at 01:34 PM

Great post. This idea of a leaky gut is so close to mainstream that scientifica american did an article on it a few years back. The article focused on celiac disease/gluten sensitivity, but did clearly state this could apply to other autoimmune diseases. http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=celiac-disease-insights

3
149af6e19a06675614dfbb6838a7d7c0

on November 10, 2011
at 06:28 PM

Please listen all the way thru for the MS parts. Read the article. http://www.meandmydiabetes.com/2011/09/14/ron-rosedale-neurodegenerative-disease-hormones-and-diet/

3
3261e9c64002f4a20aa3699d54c2dd46

on November 10, 2011
at 05:44 PM

I would say Perfect Health Diet by the Jaminets, it has the best material on autoimmune diseases that I have read so far.

Ab55ad7b980f6a8c94984aa6e23b25b4

(25)

on November 10, 2011
at 10:01 PM

That sounds good. I've heard of that and will have to check it out.

Ef31d612a661d9fcb19c8965d3a2bd12

(533)

on November 11, 2011
at 08:37 PM

Also if you post specific comments to Paul, he will help you tailor the diet.

2
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on November 11, 2011
at 12:53 AM

Getting her D level on the high side of sufficient 50-80 ng/ml (or more, depending on who you read) is essential for any autoimmune disease.

Good stuff on the Vitamin D Council site:

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/health-conditions/neurological-conditions/multiple-sclerosis/

Ca1150430b1904659742ce2cad621c7d

(12540)

on November 11, 2011
at 01:51 AM

Good point. I forgot about this. I do supplement with D... 2000-4000 IU during the summer, and 6000-8000 during the winter in gulf coast Texas. D levels went from 35ng to 68ng.

Ab55ad7b980f6a8c94984aa6e23b25b4

(25)

on November 16, 2011
at 04:52 PM

She takes Vitamin D during the winter, but I'm thinking it should probably be year round...possibly in higher doses.

0
1145a340276b66b7765d7808128062ea

(80)

on November 21, 2011
at 01:32 PM

James, first of all, I am very glad to hear your wife's MS is under control.

There is a MS group in NYC with a naturopath on staff, who typically recommends dietary changes (Dr. Bates) for a subset of patients with MS.

http://imsmp.org/about-imsmp/staff

You might be able to chat with her and get a sense of possible good alternatives for your wife. Or even see her if that is economically feasible.

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