5

votes

Hypthyroid/Hashimoto's -- starting Paleo LC caused worsening symptoms.

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 12, 2012 at 9:11 PM

I'm 36 and have Hashimoto's. Treated on Levothyroxine.

Whenever I start reducing my carbs below even 100, I start to have exaggerated hypo symptoms. Brain fog, saying the wrong word, cold hands, and anxiety. I have tried adding supplements such as potassium, magnesium, and increasing sodium but I still have the symptoms.

I think this is an increase in Reverse T3. The same thing often happens to me when I deal with an illness such as a bad cold or even have a change in thyroid medication dosing (up or down). My system really has trouble adjusting to change.

I'm frustrated -- at 5'5" and 195 lbs, I would really like to lose weight. I don't believe that avoiding saturated fat is healthy or that grains are healthy.

I started out following the advice from Primal Blueprint, and am looking into the Schwarzbein Principle as it appears to be a more gradual program.

Does anyone else have tips for how to adjust to LC while hypothyroid/Hashimoto's?

Responding to questions -- trying paleo because numerous health practitioners suggest dietary modifications similar to those of paleo to improve autoimmunity. Mercola, Wolf, and Furhrman would all agree on the grains issue. Trying LC paleo for weight loss.

I don't think it's the LC flu because it comes with symptoms that for me have long been associated with Hashi's flare-ups in the absence of dietary changes. Dizziness that is not improved by potassium intake, for example, and flare-up of dry eye syndrome.

My non-Hashi's twin had the LC flu for less than a week, and it was not severe like this.

C60406c04fff6b8d5f575725c8ac4687

(0)

on December 08, 2012
at 03:29 AM

Also, Synthroid 88mcg coating contains gluten. I'd advice to change because Hashi's & gluten allergy is linked. I just switched to Tyrosine.

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on June 26, 2012
at 01:37 AM

Juni -- Thanks for asking and for sharing your experience. . . I am also hopeful that your new doctor will treat according to the new labs. Some do see fluctuations month to month so a minor variation might not be worrisome. With an actual increase in T3, I would wonder why you are still having symptoms, as this often leads to people feeling better unless T3 is too high. . . . . As for myself, I am still figuring it out. I am looking for a new job and as a result am not eating the high-quality diet that I would prefer. I agree that there is a balance.

70895d2c0cd528713ffbebc052175052

(144)

on May 24, 2012
at 06:37 PM

I'd love to know more about why LC is bad for Hypo Thyroid. Can you direct me to an article?

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on May 22, 2012
at 02:01 PM

Thank you Juni! Yes, it does seem that it is a little harder for us. I'm with you on going the extra mile to get good sleep and experiment.

E9c4ab12cbdc9918ee4ad4e0aa6cb238

(50)

on May 14, 2012
at 06:51 PM

Eggs, all grains, soy, nuts are other foods that may trigger an immune reaction. But GFCF is a good place to start to ease in, as it's quite a change already. Quite a few studies link gluten intolerance/celiac disease with Hashi's specifically, so a GF diet is highly recommended for immune management.

E9c4ab12cbdc9918ee4ad4e0aa6cb238

(50)

on May 14, 2012
at 06:50 PM

For whatever it's worth, most of those tests are bunk and you have a high probability of getting a false negative. The best test is to quit eating both for a good 3-4 weeks, and religiously. Then reintroduce them and see how you feel. Since you are reacting I would suggest going gluten-free and dairy-free first for a few weeks and see how that affects your symptoms. If you start to feel better past the withdrawal period (2-3 weeks) then that might be the time to take on a more paleo diet. Unfortunately, many people with Hashi's and other autoimmune diseases have quite a few food intolerances.

Ff1dbd6cecad1e69a8234fb2c2c5c5ed

(1409)

on May 14, 2012
at 01:19 PM

I get tested for free T3 and free T4 twice a year. I find TSH a useless test when treated with thyroid hormones.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on May 14, 2012
at 12:06 AM

http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2012/02/higher-carb-dieting-pros-and-cons/ "In our book, we recommend a slightly low-carb diet of 20-30% of calories. If we were re-writing the book now, we would probably be a bit less specific about what carb intake is best. Rather, we would say that a carb intake around 30-40% is neutral and fully meets the body’s actual glucose needs; and discuss the pros and cons of deviating from this neutral carb intake in either direction. For most people, I believe a slightly carb-restricted intake of 20-30% of calories is optimal"

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on May 14, 2012
at 12:06 AM

I should clarify my LC reference in my prev comment; Their advise is not to reduce carbs for weight loss from their general carb recommendations. PHD is actually a "slightly low-carb diet"...more of PHD quote below

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on May 13, 2012
at 11:55 PM

http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2012/02/higher-carb-dieting-pros-and-cons/ "In our book, we recommend a slightly low-carb diet of 20-30% of calories. If we were re-writing the book now, we would probably be a bit less specific about what carb intake is best. Rather, we would say that a carb intake around 30-40% is neutral and fully meets the body’s actual glucose needs; and discuss the pros and cons of deviating from this neutral carb intake in either direction. For most people, I believe a slightly carb-restricted intake of 20-30% of calories is optimal"

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on May 13, 2012
at 11:54 PM

I should clarify my LC reference in my prev comment; i meant LC compared to a SAD diet. PHD is actually a "slightly low-carb diet"....more of PHD quote below

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on May 13, 2012
at 11:53 PM

I should clarify my LC reference in my prev comment; i meant LC compared to a SAD diet. PHD is actually a "slightly low-carb diet"....

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on May 13, 2012
at 11:23 PM

did you have to get any extra testing as a result of going LC, or just continue as normal?

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on May 13, 2012
at 11:14 PM

thank you for mentioning this.

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on May 13, 2012
at 11:14 PM

yes, I was consuming gluten and dairy before. I do have a dairy problem, not aware of a gluten/wheat problem. Now looking into testing.

4dda29dc4fbada49bd68a6fbd76bf40c

(268)

on May 13, 2012
at 06:47 PM

I was under the impression that glycogen stores in the liver control the enzymes that facilitate the conversion of t4 to t3. I also agree that Selenium is needed.

8496289baf18c2d3e210740614dc9082

(1867)

on May 13, 2012
at 05:51 PM

Deiodination of T4 to T3 does not require glucose, but it does require selenium (incorporated into the deiodinase enzyme). Glucose is needed to make thyroid stimulating hormone, however. The body will make enough glucose to glycosylate the protein substrate of the TSH alpha and beta subunits, regardless of exogenous consumption.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on May 13, 2012
at 12:55 PM

dogma is the opposite of science, belief without evidence

E7e7e1c856d4494d4a1b700b6869df90

(982)

on May 13, 2012
at 01:59 AM

dogma=science :)

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on May 13, 2012
at 01:18 AM

worth having a read of this; http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2011/02/perfect-health-diet-weight-loss-version/ "Perfect Health Diet: Weight Loss Version". Their advise is Not to go LC for weight loss. Also they have plenty of posts on their site that discuss supporting thyroid function with carbs.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on May 13, 2012
at 01:17 AM

worth having a read of this; http://perfecthealthdiet.com/2011/02/perfect-health-diet-weight-loss-version/ Their advise is Not to go LC for weight loss. Also they have plenty of posts on their site that discuss supporting thyroid function with carbs.

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on May 13, 2012
at 12:51 AM

Yes I was specifically inspired by Primal Blueprint. Luckily this diet is very anti-inflammatory even when not LC. Looking into Perfect Health Diet and WAPF for more info, I think I'll find a balance. Seems like there are lots of Hashi's 'success stories' out there and I was hoping to be one.

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on May 13, 2012
at 12:47 AM

Thank you so much for this link! Good stuff!

Eead82aa93bbcdada0bcd817d0952e58

(214)

on May 12, 2012
at 10:49 PM

are you sure this is specifically a reaction due to having Hasimoto as opposed to the low carb "flu" which has almost identical symptoms (i have Lupus and am hypo so I recognize the symptoms)

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 12, 2012
at 09:41 PM

Hashimoto is an autoimmune disease, as far as I know. Autoimmune is usually caused by inflammation. Have you tried increasing your starches - safe starches that is? Pumpkin, beets, sweet potatoes, berries, fruit?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on May 12, 2012
at 09:39 PM

If you do not mind me asking - why are you doing LC? Is it recommended for Hashimoto's?

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on May 12, 2012
at 09:26 PM

Oh and another thought -- I would like to be able to see an MD who understands the combination of issues here. But in my experience the medical profession has no idea about either autoimmunity or obesity. They would have me on low fat sugared up yogurt for breakfast.

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12 Answers

best answer

3
Ff1dbd6cecad1e69a8234fb2c2c5c5ed

(1409)

on May 13, 2012
at 04:55 AM

I second the tyrosine advice above. And I eat 2-3 brazil nuts per day to cover selenium, which is needed for T4-T3 conversion.

But then I am treated with the local equivalent of Armour, which contains quite a bit of T3. And the filler in my thyroid capsules is tyrosine... Depending on where you live (and your doctor) you could try to switch to natural thyroid and find a dose which suits you.

I have accepted that paleo will not heal my Hashimoto's and have simply adapted my treatment to the new requirements. I feel very good with a LC-version of paleo and the weight is coming off slowly.

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on May 13, 2012
at 11:23 PM

did you have to get any extra testing as a result of going LC, or just continue as normal?

Ff1dbd6cecad1e69a8234fb2c2c5c5ed

(1409)

on May 14, 2012
at 01:19 PM

I get tested for free T3 and free T4 twice a year. I find TSH a useless test when treated with thyroid hormones.

best answer

1
70895d2c0cd528713ffbebc052175052

(144)

on May 21, 2012
at 06:48 PM

I also have Hashimoto's and am hypothyroid. I went Paleo on Jan. 1st and then fell off the wagon for about 6 weeks until April when I started again on a strict Whole 30. I am losing weight but I also had a much longer adjustment period than most people. Like you, my symptoms were very similar to low thyroid. Frustrating but I stuck it out and am finally starting to feel good again. This is a very individual process so comparing yourself, even to a TWIN, is a bit fruitless.

If you are concerned, you can always have your doc monitor your levels. I'm actually getting some blood work back this week as I'm wondering how the LC has affected my levels, if at all. I'm still playing around with the amount of carbs I take in and don't know that I have found my "sweet spot" just yet. I was losing weight, but my energy was poor. After upping the carbs a little, adding more protein and putting more effort into getting proper sleep, I am seeing marked improvement with my gym performance and the inches are coming off.

These forums are great for information but it's super important to always remember that we are ALL different. I was bummed that I'd read about people feeling GREAT after four days on this plan when I was coming from a somewhat clean diet and still feeling bad after 4 weeks. Continue to tweak your diet/ratios, eat super clean and monitor your levels.
Since coming off of the Whole 30 I am noticing even more food allergies...sometimes I want to yell, "WHY AM I SO SENSITIVE TO EVERYTHING?!" but then I realize that I'm taking the steps to figure out my own body and with perseverance and discipline I can feel better than I probably ever have.
Keep with it! If you are patient and willing to adjust I just can't imagine that eating a clean diet of whole foods could ever steer you wrong.

I've read that you have to "get healthy to lose weight not lose weight to get healthy". That really allowed me to feel like I didn't have to go VLC if I wasn't feeling good on that plan and I see myself improving across the board. wishing you all the best!

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on May 22, 2012
at 02:01 PM

Thank you Juni! Yes, it does seem that it is a little harder for us. I'm with you on going the extra mile to get good sleep and experiment.

12
6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on May 13, 2012
at 12:49 AM

Try non-LC paleo. It's just like LC paleo, without the dogma.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on May 13, 2012
at 12:55 PM

dogma is the opposite of science, belief without evidence

E7e7e1c856d4494d4a1b700b6869df90

(982)

on May 13, 2012
at 01:59 AM

dogma=science :)

5
E9c4ab12cbdc9918ee4ad4e0aa6cb238

on May 13, 2012
at 06:04 PM

Were you eating gluten before going paleo/LC. One thing to consider is that when some people go GF they go through opiod withdrawal symptoms. If you're digesting gluten into opioids, as some people do, you will be temporarily worse before getting better. Don't know whether that is an issue for you. Also, are you still eating dairy? Many people with Hashi's don't do well with dairy. Perhaps together with the sudden change in diet antigenic foods may be more of a trigger.

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on May 13, 2012
at 11:14 PM

yes, I was consuming gluten and dairy before. I do have a dairy problem, not aware of a gluten/wheat problem. Now looking into testing.

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on May 13, 2012
at 11:14 PM

thank you for mentioning this.

E9c4ab12cbdc9918ee4ad4e0aa6cb238

(50)

on May 14, 2012
at 06:51 PM

Eggs, all grains, soy, nuts are other foods that may trigger an immune reaction. But GFCF is a good place to start to ease in, as it's quite a change already. Quite a few studies link gluten intolerance/celiac disease with Hashi's specifically, so a GF diet is highly recommended for immune management.

E9c4ab12cbdc9918ee4ad4e0aa6cb238

(50)

on May 14, 2012
at 06:50 PM

For whatever it's worth, most of those tests are bunk and you have a high probability of getting a false negative. The best test is to quit eating both for a good 3-4 weeks, and religiously. Then reintroduce them and see how you feel. Since you are reacting I would suggest going gluten-free and dairy-free first for a few weeks and see how that affects your symptoms. If you start to feel better past the withdrawal period (2-3 weeks) then that might be the time to take on a more paleo diet. Unfortunately, many people with Hashi's and other autoimmune diseases have quite a few food intolerances.

4
E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on May 13, 2012
at 12:54 PM

I wrote an article on losing weight with a pro thyroid diet, its very different than low carb but is definitely worth a shot.

http://co2factor.blogspot.com/2012/04/practical-ways-to-lose-fat.html

3
8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

on June 08, 2012
at 03:15 AM

Here's a 37 year old woman (now Paleo) Hashimoto's patient who's a certified athletic trainer, licensed physical therapist, and trigger point therapist.

http://www.washingtonian.com/blogs/wellbeing/health/how-a-gluten-free-paleo-diet-changed-my-life.php

The article: All of your blood work looks fine. The only thing that comes up is thyroid antibodies, but that???s nothing to worry about.??? My primary care doctor said these words to me in 1999, after I told him I???d been feeling anxious and jittery and couldn???t sleep for days at a time. I???d just had my first child a few months before, so since nothing else could be determined, the most obvious diagnosis was that I had postpartum anxiety and depression.

But while the symptoms went away over time with treatment, they were soon replaced by a mind-numbing fatigue. Little did I know that my own body was in the process of attacking itself because of an autoimmune disease called Hashimoto???s Thyroiditis.

Fast-forward to 2007. I had been under a tremendous amount of stress over the year. Though I continued to exercise, somehow I gained almost 20 pounds, and my hair began falling out in clumps. Even after eight hours of sleep, I was still so exhausted I could barely get out of bed in the morning.

I began researching my symptoms. My doctor???s words came back to me, and I began reading everything I could find on thyroid disorders. After getting an ultrasound, I discovered I had *nodules on my thyroid.*So with medication, over a few months I began to feel like I was getting some energy back. But my weight didn???t change, and exercise still proved too painful.

The impact this disease had on my life in the beginning was huge. I had been an athlete my entire life, swimming competitively in college, running 10Ks, and doing triathlons. At 37, I suddenly found myself unable to walk three miles with my children. To say that I was afraid for my future would be an understatement.

Going Gluten-Free

About a year into treatment for Hashimoto???s, I mentioned to a coworker that I felt better, but still not great. He suggested I try going gluten-free for a few weeks. I resisted, because I loved cereal, bread, and pasta. But then I learned that celiac disease is an autoimmune disease, and people with one autoimmune disease are more likely to be diagnosed with others over the years. I decided to give it a go.

After two gluten-free weeks, I felt 80 percent better. I was feeling more energetic, and gone were the cramps and painful bloating. I began to lose a little bit of weight, and I had the energy to begin gentle bodyweight exercises again. That was two years ago.

The Paleo Life

Then last spring I heard rumblings about the Paleo lifestyle. I researched the principles and learned that grains like wheat, rye, and barley can cause damage to the gut lining and put people at high risk for autoimmune diseases, including Hashimoto???s Thyroiditis, type 1 diabetes, and lupus. I went Paleo and cut out all of my gluten-free treats and dairy, increased my intake of coconut milk and oil, and began consuming larger quantities of grass-fed meats.

Almost immediately I noticed a difference in how I felt. My joint and muscle pain slowly faded away, I felt more rested when I woke up in the morning, and my brain felt sharp again. I even lost most of the weight I had gained over the years.

In the six months since I went Paleo, I???ve gone from not being able to walk a few miles to running, hiking, rock climbing, and weight lifting. My blood work looks good, my thyroid nodules are smaller, and I feel like I???m back to living the healthy life I had before Hashimoto???s decided to wreak havoc on my body.

More important, I don???t feel deprived of anything, because being able to play with my kids again is more important to me than eating pizza.

There is plenty of research to support the Paleo lifestyle as part of the comprehensive treatment plan for autoimmune diseases. A good place to start is by reading The Paleo Solution by Robb Wolf. The book explains the science and includes an index at the back listing 30 pages of research articles that helped convince me to take on this diet.

From my frustrating and trying experiences, my approach to working with my own patients as a physical therapist and trainer has changed. As part of my objective to treat the ???whole person,??? I want to be sure I provide my patients with as much information as possible, so it doesn???t take them five years to get back to living, like it took me. It was a long journey, but it feels good to be in my skin again.

3
Cd717290eb43a6e17061f9920deed977

on May 21, 2012
at 07:42 PM

You shouldn't be LC if you are hypo-thyroid. That's all. I wish more people would get this message across.

Do Paleo, but keep your carbs up. See what makes you feel best, but I would guess a level of 150 g carbs would be good. You don't need to be LC to lose weight, and further f-ing up your thyroid is not going to give you long-term health.

70895d2c0cd528713ffbebc052175052

(144)

on May 24, 2012
at 06:37 PM

I'd love to know more about why LC is bad for Hypo Thyroid. Can you direct me to an article?

3
E7e7e1c856d4494d4a1b700b6869df90

(982)

on May 13, 2012
at 12:42 AM

Start here:

http://livinlavidalowcarb.com/blog/the-llvlc-show-episode-460-dr-joni-labbe-helps-patients-deal-with-thyroid-problems/10363

In Episode 460 of ???The Livin??? La Vida Low-Carb Show with Jimmy Moore,??? we hear from a San Diego, California-based chiropractor named Dr. Joni Labbe who has been mentored by a previous podcast guest named Dr. Datis Kharrazian who is one of the world???s foremost authorities on the subject of thyroid health. Dr. Labbe personally dealt with Hashimoto???s Disease and found the principles shared by Dr. Kharrazian to work for her???and now she???s passing along everything she has learned with her own patients dealing with a myriad of thyroid-related health issues. Dr. Labbe adds yet another voice of reason to this confusing yet vitally important subject.

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on May 13, 2012
at 12:47 AM

Thank you so much for this link! Good stuff!

3
8496289baf18c2d3e210740614dc9082

on May 13, 2012
at 12:22 AM

You might want to look into tyrosine-rich foods (wine, cheese, meats, avocado, banana, et al.), as tyrosine is the immediate precursor to thyroid hormone, dopamine, and adrenaline/epinephrine.

If you're following Primal Blueprint, I assume you're working out your omega 3:6 balance (which should help). Perhaps instead of jumping into LC/VLC, you should concentrate on an anti-inflammatory diet: heal your gut with bone broth; remove grains and legumes but not carbs especially; increase your healthy fat consumption by using safe starches as a fat-delivery mechanism (e.g. peeled sweet potato with half a stick of melted butter and coconut oil).

Without knowing more specifically what you're doing and eating, better advice is hard. In general I would focus on lowering inflammation and healing your gut prior to worrying about carb intake. Eliminating grains and legumes will drastically lower your carbs happenstantially c:

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on May 13, 2012
at 12:51 AM

Yes I was specifically inspired by Primal Blueprint. Luckily this diet is very anti-inflammatory even when not LC. Looking into Perfect Health Diet and WAPF for more info, I think I'll find a balance. Seems like there are lots of Hashi's 'success stories' out there and I was hoping to be one.

2
70895d2c0cd528713ffbebc052175052

(144)

on June 25, 2012
at 11:23 PM

Elisa- curious to know how you are doing...I replied to your post some weeks back. I recently got back some blood work and noticed that although my TSH had gone done a teeny bit (not enough to make me feel better though) my T3 had gone up. I've been experiencing the same "I feel like I can't talk right" kind of stuff you described. Even right now, I have to re-read posts because the brain fog is so thick....UGH. Why do you think that T3 does this? My current doctor still believes in the old TSH range and I'm quite a bit higher than what the new school docs believe is where most patients feel best. THANKFULLY, I have an appt with my new doctor who I am hopeful will listen to the fact that I have been feeling miserable on this dose of Synthroid. I am very hopeful that I will start feeling the benefits of the Paleo diet once I get my levels back to a comfortable level.
I have a little bit of weight I'd like to lose and went into Paleo thinking low carb would do it...It kind of did but it also really made me irritable and constipated. After looking into the Perfect Health diet, and what others had said about thyroid patients upping their carbs, I added back some white rice and potato. I felt SO MUCH BETTER! I have to be careful though because too many carbs and I want sweets. I was scared I'd gain weight but I didn't. I actually finally felt nourished. I know many Paleo folks are very anti rice and potato, I thought they were evil too. I cannot tell you though how much I learned by adding a bit in. I finally felt like I was starting to feel the greatness that other's described. Don't get me wrong, I still have to tweak, and am still finding my way but I think it may be worth a shot if you are still suffering.
I'm also hoping for myself that the increase in carbs and a better dose of thyroid meds will help everything fall into place for me. If you have the time and feel like it, I'd love to know where you are at with all of this. Your experience helps me understand my own. :) Thanks!

886436139cec4c2fbf30d26a40a0fc06

(219)

on June 26, 2012
at 01:37 AM

Juni -- Thanks for asking and for sharing your experience. . . I am also hopeful that your new doctor will treat according to the new labs. Some do see fluctuations month to month so a minor variation might not be worrisome. With an actual increase in T3, I would wonder why you are still having symptoms, as this often leads to people feeling better unless T3 is too high. . . . . As for myself, I am still figuring it out. I am looking for a new job and as a result am not eating the high-quality diet that I would prefer. I agree that there is a balance.

2
4dda29dc4fbada49bd68a6fbd76bf40c

on May 13, 2012
at 06:33 AM

Glucose is needed to transform thyroid hormones into active thyroid. Eat more carbs.

4dda29dc4fbada49bd68a6fbd76bf40c

(268)

on May 13, 2012
at 06:47 PM

I was under the impression that glycogen stores in the liver control the enzymes that facilitate the conversion of t4 to t3. I also agree that Selenium is needed.

8496289baf18c2d3e210740614dc9082

(1867)

on May 13, 2012
at 05:51 PM

Deiodination of T4 to T3 does not require glucose, but it does require selenium (incorporated into the deiodinase enzyme). Glucose is needed to make thyroid stimulating hormone, however. The body will make enough glucose to glycosylate the protein substrate of the TSH alpha and beta subunits, regardless of exogenous consumption.

0
C60406c04fff6b8d5f575725c8ac4687

on December 08, 2012
at 03:27 AM

Hi Elisa, I also have Hashi's & Pernicious Anemia. I'm seeing a natural path who is working with my "whole body". My doctor recommends eating 5-6 small meals a day. Always eating protein with each meal because it will keep your blood sugar level. I only eat chicken/fish, veggies, fruit, and occasionally eat brown rice. I recommend seeing a natural path because they will understand your concerns and beable to help you in a natural way. Good luck!! Jen :0)

C60406c04fff6b8d5f575725c8ac4687

(0)

on December 08, 2012
at 03:29 AM

Also, Synthroid 88mcg coating contains gluten. I'd advice to change because Hashi's & gluten allergy is linked. I just switched to Tyrosine.

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