18

votes

Gluten cross reactivity?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created June 20, 2011 at 8:49 PM

After doing some diet/symptom comparisons I figured out that mthe numbness/tingling I was having in my right hand and foot was being triggered by my dark chocolate and butter consumption (a traumatic discovery- particularly the chocolate!) A little more research lead me to the discovery of gluten cross reactors (PDF).

I hoping to hunt down a few more issues that I have-I'll be doing an eliminating diet with each of the common cross reactors in the hopes of clearing those last little issues up.

In the meantime I was wondering how many other people have discovered that they are vulnerable to gluten cross reactors? What are the common symptoms that you have when exposed?


Some common cross reactors include:

-chocolate.

-dairy.

-coffee.

-amaranth.

-quinoa.

-sorghum. -corn. -etc.

-

696079a860ef54810406ae25e4650863

(1623)

on January 30, 2013
at 01:37 AM

I posted this some time last year, but neglected to updated that my apparent chocolate and coffee sensitivities now seem to be resolved since I acquired mycotoxin (mold toxin) free sources. You might want to look into this as a potential source of some of your cross reactivity, since mold is a major part of the industrial production of coffee, many chocolates and corn. Mold exposure is also known to exacerbate gluten snd casein sensitivity. on my phone or I'd supply links. Check out dave Asprey's take on mycotoxins. It's worked for me.

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on June 26, 2011
at 08:31 PM

If you want to test dairy further, try ghee which is casein free.

696079a860ef54810406ae25e4650863

(1623)

on June 26, 2011
at 07:11 PM

I agree that it will be interesting to see more science on it... I'm leaning towards the idea of cross activity having validity, since cows milk seems to be a potential cross reactor for me and I have been affected by even milk straight from the cow... Not that I'm ruling out a fluke other exposure to actual gluten at the time- since there is so much we dont understand I try to keep my mind relatively open to other potentials and not get caut up by one idea...

696079a860ef54810406ae25e4650863

(1623)

on June 23, 2011
at 05:08 PM

Yeah- I just checked that out- turns out that it was from Dr Thomas O'Bryan- same guy who put together the informational pdf on gluten cross reactivity I posted the link to. Small world! Thanks. :) here's a link to the podcast on the uw site: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/undergroundwellness/2011/01/11/detecting-gluten-sensitivity-with-dr-thomas-obryan

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on June 23, 2011
at 04:15 AM

I just listened to a really fantastic podcast about gluten sensitivity.... Don't know how to post a link to i tunes, but if you look for the 'underground wellness' podcast, episode from Jan 11,2011

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on June 22, 2011
at 03:27 PM

I'm not sure either; I find the whole thing confusing. Do you tolerate ghee (no casein)? What was the cow fed?

696079a860ef54810406ae25e4650863

(1623)

on June 21, 2011
at 09:05 PM

Not sure but I'll be looking into it for sure- I'll post any useful info I get.

696079a860ef54810406ae25e4650863

(1623)

on June 21, 2011
at 09:04 PM

Interesting article, not sure I agree about all cross reactivity being actually due to "small amounts of gluten in the processing" since one of my cross reactors is dairy and I've even had the issue with milk straight from the cow... But It could definitely be a culprit as well in the more processed foods.

696079a860ef54810406ae25e4650863

(1623)

on June 21, 2011
at 08:57 PM

Exactly my question- I'm definitely going to be looking into this more- if I get any more good resources I'll be sure to share them :)

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on June 21, 2011
at 05:20 AM

Wow!!! Great PDF. thanks for sharing!!!

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on June 21, 2011
at 02:44 AM

weird! interesting!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 21, 2011
at 02:08 AM

Thanks, desertsnail. I did a cursory search and found nothing definitive expect many docs suggesting self-tracking to test possible culprits. I also found a lot of discussion about what you posted on the celiac forums. I guess they were all aware of it.

696079a860ef54810406ae25e4650863

(1623)

on June 21, 2011
at 12:19 AM

Baconbitch- as far as I know sweet potatoes are in a different family and aren't true potatoes/nightshades at all, but I'd still look into it to be extra safe!

696079a860ef54810406ae25e4650863

(1623)

on June 21, 2011
at 12:17 AM

Senneth- good luck! Rockingredhead- cross reactors are substances that are similar enough in their structure to one of the gluten proteins to get confused for them by the body- they will thus cause similar complications/immune reactions. Check the link to the PDF I posted for a better explanation. Hope this helps... :)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 20, 2011
at 10:42 PM

Potato? NOOOO. But I would like to know if the author is referring to ALL potatoes including sweet potatoes. Now I need to cycle out these foods to test myself!

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on June 20, 2011
at 09:51 PM

I should add that my IGG test for food allergies did not show any of the 'cross reactors' as spiked. Nor have I noticed a reaction to them in particular. (coffee and chocolate) However If they fit in the same receptor, its worth trying to go without them, even a small reaction can contribute to a big problem.

6235e0b7e3c4c4b9df3d926829bc32f6

(333)

on June 20, 2011
at 09:37 PM

I don't quite understand what a gluten cross reactor is. Could someone please explain?

F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on June 20, 2011
at 09:07 PM

I am wondering the same thing! Thanks so much for that informational link. I have only gotten worse after going gluten free. Grain free hasn't helped either. Nor egg and dairy free. I hate to say it, but after reading this, maybe its the coffee and chocolate. Time for yet another food trial.

  • 696079a860ef54810406ae25e4650863

    asked by

    (1623)
  • Views
    7.7K
  • Last Activity
    1256D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

9 Answers

best answer

3
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on June 20, 2011
at 09:48 PM

My gauge is whether or not a food puts my sacrum 'out' of alignment. This is a subject that does not have very much research put into it but I think it is quite important. When I am out of alignment, my sleep is not as good, anxiety and irritability increase, pooping is not as good, and digestion is also not as good.

The following things I am quite sure will put me out... boxed coconut water (but not fresh stuff), coconut milk (probably guar gum), orbit gum (aspartame), chocolate (even 85% dark), all things gluten, and one particular type of gluten free pizza. Basically anything processed.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on June 21, 2011
at 02:44 AM

weird! interesting!

best answer

5
2d5221fa80d04a3d8ac6f471f9feae81

(894)

on June 21, 2011
at 03:08 AM

Chris Kresser's list goes like this: * alpha-casein * beta-casein * casomorphin * milk butyrophilin * cow???s milk * american cheese * chocolate * coffee * all cereal grains * quinoa * amaranth * buckwheat * tapioca * rice * potato * corn * sesame

He also promised a whole post on cross-reactivity a few months ago. It's a very interesting topic. Although I think the main point here is the question of how cross reactivity affects the healing of gut lining when wheat is not present. Does it cause a slow down, prevents it entirely, actually causes similar damage or has no effect? Because in the latter case - once the gut has healed - all cross reactivity would cease. But with the former it's pretty much lifetime avoidance.

696079a860ef54810406ae25e4650863

(1623)

on June 21, 2011
at 08:57 PM

Exactly my question- I'm definitely going to be looking into this more- if I get any more good resources I'll be sure to share them :)

3
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on June 21, 2011
at 02:35 PM

696079a860ef54810406ae25e4650863

(1623)

on June 21, 2011
at 09:04 PM

Interesting article, not sure I agree about all cross reactivity being actually due to "small amounts of gluten in the processing" since one of my cross reactors is dairy and I've even had the issue with milk straight from the cow... But It could definitely be a culprit as well in the more processed foods.

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on June 22, 2011
at 03:27 PM

I'm not sure either; I find the whole thing confusing. Do you tolerate ghee (no casein)? What was the cow fed?

2
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on June 25, 2011
at 04:52 PM

I think Dr O'Bryan is doing a great job of getting the word out about gluten sensitivity and celiac. But I don't think that the idea of cross-reactivity is backed up by science yet.

I think very small amounts of gluten are more likely to be the problem, or possibly some other sort of contamination. For example, do you know that coffee is generally packaged in sacks made of hemp? Hemp is almost always cc'd with gluten. I know people who have problems with coffee unless they wash the beans first. Is it gluten, is it hemp? I don't know, but it doesn't seem to be the coffee itself. I don't drink coffee, but if I liked it, I would try washing it first!

696079a860ef54810406ae25e4650863

(1623)

on June 26, 2011
at 07:11 PM

I agree that it will be interesting to see more science on it... I'm leaning towards the idea of cross activity having validity, since cows milk seems to be a potential cross reactor for me and I have been affected by even milk straight from the cow... Not that I'm ruling out a fluke other exposure to actual gluten at the time- since there is so much we dont understand I try to keep my mind relatively open to other potentials and not get caut up by one idea...

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on June 26, 2011
at 08:31 PM

If you want to test dairy further, try ghee which is casein free.

2
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on June 20, 2011
at 09:30 PM

I've seen home gluten tests on coffee (and tea) that were positive. Chocolate does not test well. There are several sites that share gluten test results.

One is Juno and it serves the Raleigh, NC area. Another is http://www.glutenfreewatchdog.org/ Both of these sites are fee based.

Another (no fee) is glutenzap. The demographic there is extremely sensitive gluten intolerants. There's some discussion of the concept of cross reactivity there, as well.

There may be other sites using gluten test kits; these are just the ones I know about.

1
B1c972b1e73968aed2f3433eb89214c1

on January 29, 2013
at 03:07 AM

I recently went gluten free and quickly discovered corn was a major cross-reactor for me. I did try organic blue corn without a reaction (I think). I also react to gluten-free oats, buckwheat, and coffee (so far. I'm still testing out common cross-reactors). After eating only 100% gluten/corn free items tonight (as far as I know anyway- I called all manufacturers, but most of it was fruits/veggies which I washed very well), I am having a mild reaction. I'm thinking it's the coconut milk which is corn/gluten free, but I read that some people react to coconut. This would make me very sad because I've been dairy free since the age of 4 and soy free for a few years now. Almond milk is out since nuts give me cold sores. That leaves rice milk (which is another possible cross-reactor) and my usual flax milk (which I love and really hope I continue to tolerate). So frustrating!

696079a860ef54810406ae25e4650863

(1623)

on January 30, 2013
at 01:37 AM

I posted this some time last year, but neglected to updated that my apparent chocolate and coffee sensitivities now seem to be resolved since I acquired mycotoxin (mold toxin) free sources. You might want to look into this as a potential source of some of your cross reactivity, since mold is a major part of the industrial production of coffee, many chocolates and corn. Mold exposure is also known to exacerbate gluten snd casein sensitivity. on my phone or I'd supply links. Check out dave Asprey's take on mycotoxins. It's worked for me.

1
7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on October 15, 2012
at 11:11 PM

I have a reaction to most chocolate, but not to certain chocolates that are ELISA-tested to be gluten free (and thank god for that, because I thought I was going to have to give up chocolate forever).

I also can't tolerate most dairy products (but sometimes I can tolerate ice cream from particular dairies, making me wonder if gluten is getting through to the milk, like it has been shown to in humans).

Coffee is also off-limits for me.

I've been ok with ELISA-tested gluten-free, alkalinized corn.

Amaranth and quinoa require more testing but seem to be ok.

I've had a reaction to ELISA-tested gluten-free buckwheat, but would need to test it again to completely rule it out.

1
22212e9ba2a041e6da6c963d4d41615a

(5773)

on June 21, 2011
at 03:21 PM

The only thing on that list that i consume is decaf coffee and chocolate. I cut out the coffee 2 weeks ago and I am sad to say I can tell the difference. However, I still have a piece of chocolate or two a couple times a week. Not sure I am consuming enough to see a difference.

Do you think that you can reverse some of the cross-reactive sensativities once you completely heal the gut. I know you cannot reverse celiac but what about the cross-reactivity.

696079a860ef54810406ae25e4650863

(1623)

on June 21, 2011
at 09:05 PM

Not sure but I'll be looking into it for sure- I'll post any useful info I get.

0
696079a860ef54810406ae25e4650863

on January 30, 2013
at 01:39 AM

Update to cross reactivity thread: I posted this some time last year, but neglected to updated that my apparent chocolate and coffee sensitivities now seem to be resolved since I acquired mycotoxin (mold toxin) free sources. You might want to look into this as a potential source of some of your cross reactivity, since mold is a major part of the industrial production of coffee, many chocolates and corn. Mold exposure is also known to exacerbate gluten snd casein sensitivity. on my phone or I'd supply links. Check out dave Asprey's take on mycotoxins. It's worked for me.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!