5

votes

Evidence for gliadin increasing appetite?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created December 19, 2011 at 8:32 PM

Dr. William Davis (of "Wheat Belly" fame) claims that the gliadin present in wheat increases appetite. He even quantifies the amount as 400 kCal. I have seen references that Dr. Davis conducted the study that concludes this. Is it published? I've been unable to find any independent evidence to support his conclusion. Is there any?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 24, 2011
at 01:56 AM

Oh that math is way too hard for my aged brain.

664efb0a77ab70435f580d6867afa0fa

(544)

on December 23, 2011
at 09:08 PM

If you have lost a significant amount of weight, I have to assume that your evidence is more along the lines of N=0.8 or N=0.7, yes?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 23, 2011
at 08:22 PM

make that independent

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 23, 2011
at 08:03 PM

Whoa, sorry Mitch. You could just take my anecdotal evidence as support of Dr. Davis's theory. I think it qualifies under indeoendent evidence.

664efb0a77ab70435f580d6867afa0fa

(544)

on December 23, 2011
at 06:06 PM

I asked for evidence or studies, not anecdotes. But your anecdote wasn't even relevant to the question. You imply you had weight-loss from restricting wheat. But consider this: I know several people who lost weight on a low-fat diet. Should I consider this evidence that fat increases appetite?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 23, 2011
at 03:43 PM

Thanks for the down vote- what happened to N=1?

664efb0a77ab70435f580d6867afa0fa

(544)

on December 22, 2011
at 10:32 PM

Thanks for the link. This appears to be a description of a not-yet-complete-and-unpublished study, giving intermediate results. It doesn't appear to address appetite directly, but rather fat accumulation. But, I would be reading the auto-translation incorrectly... the translation seems confusing and contradictory in places. Is there a published study related to this article?

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 21, 2011
at 04:38 PM

WRT gliadin, is it possible that there is a whole subset of the population that producers more zonunlin, and therefore are more susceptible to the problems of WGA?

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 21, 2011
at 04:37 PM

I found the full paper somewhere else somehow, but I believe this is the same thing... http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/content/meeting_abstract/24/1_MeetingAbstracts/723.10

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on December 21, 2011
at 12:38 PM

Jeff, do you have a link to that for me? Thanks! Hmmm... healthy/unhealthy, I think that "out" must be applied with care. There's a startling lack of even attempts to measure plasma levels of lectins and such in people with leaky guts and such. I think I have to search the PHD site. I did the calculation on gliadin once and it's not likely to produce physiologically significant concentrations from even heavy wheat consumption.

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on December 21, 2011
at 12:31 PM

WRT, with respect to, but Efaitch's is close enough. I agree Jeff, problems in the gut can certainly be attributed to WGA. My issue with discussion of WGA as insulin mimetic are that it takes a number of things to occur before such action is considered. Does WGA get absorbed intact in physiologically significant amounts? The answer to that appears to be no.

C4134ed417dbc0a6b79ab2cee32632d3

(1801)

on December 20, 2011
at 10:12 PM

WRT = with regards to :-)

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 20, 2011
at 03:59 PM

what does WRT mean? but yeah I know that thesis, it's by Jessica Kuzma. Just because it was not measurable in the plasma doesn't mean it's not still affecting things in the gut though, right? Also, she tested on healthy subjects, arguably the majority of people Dr. Davis sees are not healthy.

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on December 20, 2011
at 02:13 PM

WRT the WGA, I came across a thesis dissertation that dosed humans with WGA and measured blood levels -- it was not measurable despite the subjects getting wheat germ and not whole wheat or white wheat flour. I'll try and find the link when I get a chance.

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4 Answers

1
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on December 19, 2011
at 09:21 PM

Great question. I don't have an answer, but it would be interesting to find out exactly what it is with wheat that makes you want to eat so much. Carb calorie-for-calorie, I can eat pure sugar or pure white rice with less increase in appetite than a bit of bread. Because of that, I doubt it is due to the blood sugar rush or the type of starch it contains.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 23, 2011
at 02:39 PM

I just have to look at my fattest pictures to see evidence that wheat increases appetite, leading to overeating. Don't even need the mice!

664efb0a77ab70435f580d6867afa0fa

(544)

on December 23, 2011
at 09:08 PM

If you have lost a significant amount of weight, I have to assume that your evidence is more along the lines of N=0.8 or N=0.7, yes?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 23, 2011
at 08:22 PM

make that independent

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 23, 2011
at 08:03 PM

Whoa, sorry Mitch. You could just take my anecdotal evidence as support of Dr. Davis's theory. I think it qualifies under indeoendent evidence.

664efb0a77ab70435f580d6867afa0fa

(544)

on December 23, 2011
at 06:06 PM

I asked for evidence or studies, not anecdotes. But your anecdote wasn't even relevant to the question. You imply you had weight-loss from restricting wheat. But consider this: I know several people who lost weight on a low-fat diet. Should I consider this evidence that fat increases appetite?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 23, 2011
at 03:43 PM

Thanks for the down vote- what happened to N=1?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 24, 2011
at 01:56 AM

Oh that math is way too hard for my aged brain.

0
6869a1f2294b3a717a53645589a91d18

(1689)

on December 20, 2011
at 04:15 AM

Mice eating wheat gluten gained 25% more body weight and 33% more abdominal fat according to here

664efb0a77ab70435f580d6867afa0fa

(544)

on December 22, 2011
at 10:32 PM

Thanks for the link. This appears to be a description of a not-yet-complete-and-unpublished study, giving intermediate results. It doesn't appear to address appetite directly, but rather fat accumulation. But, I would be reading the auto-translation incorrectly... the translation seems confusing and contradictory in places. Is there a published study related to this article?

0
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 19, 2011
at 09:15 PM

Good question. I assumed it was due to the effects of the quickly digesting amylopectin-a on blood sugar, OR due to the WGA lectin that has insulin mimetic effects.

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on December 20, 2011
at 02:13 PM

WRT the WGA, I came across a thesis dissertation that dosed humans with WGA and measured blood levels -- it was not measurable despite the subjects getting wheat germ and not whole wheat or white wheat flour. I'll try and find the link when I get a chance.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 21, 2011
at 04:38 PM

WRT gliadin, is it possible that there is a whole subset of the population that producers more zonunlin, and therefore are more susceptible to the problems of WGA?

C4134ed417dbc0a6b79ab2cee32632d3

(1801)

on December 20, 2011
at 10:12 PM

WRT = with regards to :-)

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on December 21, 2011
at 12:31 PM

WRT, with respect to, but Efaitch's is close enough. I agree Jeff, problems in the gut can certainly be attributed to WGA. My issue with discussion of WGA as insulin mimetic are that it takes a number of things to occur before such action is considered. Does WGA get absorbed intact in physiologically significant amounts? The answer to that appears to be no.

24df4e0d0e7ce98963d4641fae1a60e5

on December 21, 2011
at 12:38 PM

Jeff, do you have a link to that for me? Thanks! Hmmm... healthy/unhealthy, I think that "out" must be applied with care. There's a startling lack of even attempts to measure plasma levels of lectins and such in people with leaky guts and such. I think I have to search the PHD site. I did the calculation on gliadin once and it's not likely to produce physiologically significant concentrations from even heavy wheat consumption.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 20, 2011
at 03:59 PM

what does WRT mean? but yeah I know that thesis, it's by Jessica Kuzma. Just because it was not measurable in the plasma doesn't mean it's not still affecting things in the gut though, right? Also, she tested on healthy subjects, arguably the majority of people Dr. Davis sees are not healthy.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 21, 2011
at 04:37 PM

I found the full paper somewhere else somehow, but I believe this is the same thing... http://www.fasebj.org/cgi/content/meeting_abstract/24/1_MeetingAbstracts/723.10

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