3

votes

Learned anxiety

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 13, 2013 at 12:53 PM

I seem to get a rush of adrenaline at inappropriate times

every time I think about something like having to submit a piece of work or if there is some kind of argument I get this flourish in my chest, like kind of hot, I think it's adrenaline

Why do I do this? I think it's what's wrecking my health.

Is there a way to stop it? Is it all diet? or can it be curbed through thinking?

Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

(2022)

on March 13, 2013
at 09:01 PM

Is that all you got out of 3 paragraphs? My point in mentioning the Lord's Prayer or the pledge was that it's basically meditation. Reciting a poem repeatedly would give you the same benefit.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on March 13, 2013
at 04:56 PM

It can be curbed through NOT thinking.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on March 13, 2013
at 04:46 PM

I also open a capsule into a glass and take it with an emergen-c twice day. It's kind of gross because of the magnesium stearate floating on the top, so if you find one that is just pure magnesium glycinate it will be more flexible for uses like that (however there's nothing at all dangerous about magnesium stearate).

Medium avatar

(39831)

on March 13, 2013
at 04:44 PM

What works best for me is a 100mg magnesium glycinate supplement that consists of powder in a capsule. I take one with every meal. Zero side effects and great absorption.

43873f3cea4f22f91653b0f5ec7ab9d9

(401)

on March 13, 2013
at 04:43 PM

+1 for magnesium. Travis, what kind of magnesium do you take, how much, and when? I take 400mg of Bluebonnet Chelated Magnesium right before bed (so, on an empty stomach). It's an Albion chelate which apparently is the best. But I've heard so many conflicting things on whether to take it with meals, on an empty stomach, etc. What do you think is best?

7cf9f5b08a41ecf2a2d2bc0b31ea6fa0

(4176)

on March 13, 2013
at 04:37 PM

'or any prayer or saying...could be the pledge of allegiance if you aren't religious' cheers for the advice but might have to think of something else seeing as I'm English and don't believe in god :p

7cf9f5b08a41ecf2a2d2bc0b31ea6fa0

(4176)

on March 13, 2013
at 04:36 PM

Cheers, I'll start supplementing again

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on March 13, 2013
at 04:03 PM

Check out EFT (aka tapping) www.eftuniverse.com.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on March 13, 2013
at 01:36 PM

It seems to me like you're getting the fight or flight response and defaulting to flight (fear) instead of fight (excitement). Changing this is a huge paradigm shift probably with some deep hormonal roots. I'd try to create an anabolic environment through thinking , exercise and diet.

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6 Answers

1
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on March 13, 2013
at 05:59 PM

Currently fighting the fight or flight thing with this- Marconi Union's Weightless is supposedly one of the most calming songs in the worlds. The beat helps the heart to where it is supposed to be.
I have been having some serious stress lately, and I am beginning to think the heart rate variability stuff is as important as Dave Asprey says it is. I don't know if you can make his blinky light box from the Hearth Math institute go down with this song, but after listening to it, breathing, and meditating for 8 minutes, I do think even simple tech can probably give us a short cut to the sorts of states of mind that it would take years to achieve otherwise.

In any case, this plus whatever you like to meditate about helps a lot. Part of this whole thing makes me think about when I was reading about the Eastern Orthodox hesychasm breathing practices. They say this thing 'mind in heart' a lot, and I am beginning to think prayer is a state of being, not a conversation in way people are doing it in the West. Everything we do, we do on this substrate of cells, and I've noticed we've lost the understanding that we are one, integrated entity. When I was younger, I couldn't even understand why fasting was a Christian practice- it just got me irritable and grouchy. It wasn't until I tried it, probably while I was in ketosis, essentially mimicking the biochemistry of a hunter, that it became understandable.

I've been wanting to play with some audio software and see if I could come up with something similar, so that I could just give it out for free, but I am not that well versed in it.

1
Medium avatar

on March 13, 2013
at 04:25 PM

I used to get that sort of anticipatory anxiety all the time before I took magnesium. It would happen if I had any sort of deadline or even something innocuous scheduled like a routine doctor's visit.

7cf9f5b08a41ecf2a2d2bc0b31ea6fa0

(4176)

on March 13, 2013
at 04:36 PM

Cheers, I'll start supplementing again

43873f3cea4f22f91653b0f5ec7ab9d9

(401)

on March 13, 2013
at 04:43 PM

+1 for magnesium. Travis, what kind of magnesium do you take, how much, and when? I take 400mg of Bluebonnet Chelated Magnesium right before bed (so, on an empty stomach). It's an Albion chelate which apparently is the best. But I've heard so many conflicting things on whether to take it with meals, on an empty stomach, etc. What do you think is best?

Medium avatar

(39831)

on March 13, 2013
at 04:46 PM

I also open a capsule into a glass and take it with an emergen-c twice day. It's kind of gross because of the magnesium stearate floating on the top, so if you find one that is just pure magnesium glycinate it will be more flexible for uses like that (however there's nothing at all dangerous about magnesium stearate).

Medium avatar

(39831)

on March 13, 2013
at 04:44 PM

What works best for me is a 100mg magnesium glycinate supplement that consists of powder in a capsule. I take one with every meal. Zero side effects and great absorption.

1
Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

on March 13, 2013
at 03:41 PM

I do the same thing. It happens most often at night or if I've had too much sugar or crappy food. I'll picture something terrible happening...the other night I kept thinking about my kids getting hit by a car and the 8000 ways it could happen (none of which were very plausible). Every scenario makes me feel a rush of adrenaline and then I get shaky.

This started to become more common after having kids. I think there is probably some sort of purpose to it. Maybe I am imagining 1001 ways my kids can get hurt so that I can mentally prepare for any scenario that could possibly happen, no matter how ridiculous. There are control issues there too....if I can prepare for something horrible, maybe it won't be so horrible. I have also read that people can become addicted to this feeling. I remember being terrified of tornadoes as a kid and sitting in front of the TV, watching the radar and shaking. The feeling of relief when the storm passed was intense, and possibly addictive in a way.

I have found that yoga has helped. Medication helped in the past, although I'm off it now. This diet and regular exercise has helped. Also, adding in VitD everyday has made a huge difference. When I get scary thoughts, I usually have some sort of mantra in my head to fill the space. Sometimes I have a phrase, sometimes it's the Lord's Prayer (or any prayer or saying...could be the pledge of allegiance if you aren't religious), sometimes I picture myself looking at a river and watching the thoughts float away. Those things are surprisingly helpful.

7cf9f5b08a41ecf2a2d2bc0b31ea6fa0

(4176)

on March 13, 2013
at 04:37 PM

'or any prayer or saying...could be the pledge of allegiance if you aren't religious' cheers for the advice but might have to think of something else seeing as I'm English and don't believe in god :p

Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

(2022)

on March 13, 2013
at 09:01 PM

Is that all you got out of 3 paragraphs? My point in mentioning the Lord's Prayer or the pledge was that it's basically meditation. Reciting a poem repeatedly would give you the same benefit.

1
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on March 13, 2013
at 03:20 PM

I get the same from some foods I eat. I noticed consuming sugar and dairy make me very irritable.

Also, I found one trick that works for job search and other important things in life - think of it as a game. Not that your life depends on it and will be the end of the world if you screw it up this time. Just take it as if it is a game. You win - you win. You lose - so what, there is another round. It really really works! I mean, each time I have this attitude, I get exactly what I want! I guess people around just feel your relaxed attitude. At least that's what I attribute it to.

0
8292546789ca48c32ead34c6e884d059

on March 13, 2013
at 05:27 PM

Vitamin D, Magnesium, and cutting cabs helped with my anxiety issues.

0
10121ac7b6beb99c0fbfbf1522c50adb

on March 13, 2013
at 02:57 PM

As far as diet, what are you eating? I find that going too high in carbs makes me jittery and too low makes me cranky. Fat makes everything better.

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