3

votes

Hack social anxiety/ excessive sweating, please

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 31, 2012 at 11:52 AM

Does anyone else sweat excessively in social situations?

Most of the time, sweat levels are normal, however in new social situations (think job interviews, meetings, etc) sweating becomes profuse & embarrassing. (of course there is lots of sweat during exercise, but that's not a concern)

Do any of you experience this, and how have you managed to help control it. I'd love to hear from both males and females of all ages, or anyone with insight from a physiological perspective.

Note: I acknowledge that no one is giving medical advice, I'm simply looking for your thoughts and experiences.

Many thanks!

4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on June 01, 2012
at 12:07 AM

Cutting hair short (maybe not an option for females) will also help by making heat dissipation through the scalp easier.

06c0ce9ada45c9680344e22e28b3960f

on May 31, 2012
at 02:02 PM

I am in your boat. College Oral Speaking class was the worst - the sweat was dripping in waves down my face. Eventually I mentioned it in class, that I had a difficulty with it, and everyone understood (everyone in the class was nervous about public speaking) and everyone was very supportive. This greatly lessened my anxiety about it. I actually *recommend* taking a Public Speaking course (like Toastmasters) to get through this - facing it directly will make your anxiety lessen over time, and in other situations. There might be a dietary component, but I think it may not be primary...

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:07 PM

I'm not sure if there is a dietary component. If there is, it probably isn't as simple as high carbs = sweating, but if you are seeing a clear correlation with social situations, then that probably can't be ignored. Correlation doesn't equal causation, but it's a good place to start looking.

65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:05 PM

Thanks Mike, I appreciate your personal experience! :)

65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:04 PM

Thanks for the comments so far; I'm exploring the dietary aspects because I've read that higher carb diets can lead to more sweating, thus perhaps lower carb diets might lead to less (by my logic anyhow). This is in fact a question for a friend who is cogniscent of it, and refuses to take prescriptive anti depressants which were suggested to him to manage it. I've recommended he see a naturopath as well.

Ae3b7ea9f3755af32287825db8d98796

(2022)

on May 31, 2012
at 12:44 PM

I think this absolutely could be diet/exercise related. Jen, I don't feel comfortable sharing my experience here, but I can send you an email if you'd like. I'm sorry, I know it sucks.

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on May 31, 2012
at 11:55 AM

This sounds like serious anxiety/social phobia and not necessarily a dietary issue.

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on May 31, 2012
at 11:54 AM

This sounds like serious anxiety/social phobia and not necessarily and dietary issue.

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6 Answers

1
4c241a53d2a89c4eade52194556967f1

on June 01, 2012
at 01:44 AM

I have pretty severe hyperhydrosis all over, but mine was even at rest, and just worse when stressed. I had a thoracic sympathectomy in '99 and it totally cured my hands, but didn't help my feet at all. It somewhat helped my underarms. I do have some compensatory sweating - meaning that I sweat more in other areas to make up for the lack of sweating from my hands. I'm a dream. ;) Luckily I have a very supportive husband!

There are a lot of topical things to try first, and some people will do Botox injections for temporary relief. Also, I have an iontophoresis machine that I use on my feet which helps a little. (google it lol)

I feel your pain. I don't believe it's diet at all - it's hereditary. Mom and aunt both have it. I'll answere any other questions you have any time. Good luck!

1
91882203467f64f68f25f58f1caeee68

(1017)

on June 01, 2012
at 12:30 AM

I had a friend who had this but it was isolated to his hands. They were always wet. He ended up getting surgery for it and the problem went away. Not sure if that helps you, I have no idea what his condition was called, but do know it was treatable with surgery.

1
Fb1acc37c066271cd4addf494f02861e

on June 01, 2012
at 12:03 AM

so,

on the medication side [not much, but who knows ?] you've got some homoeopathic sedatives like gelsemium or other homoeopathic stuff focusing on sweat.

you've got http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cognitive_behavioral_therapy to manage also your stress level.

you can try to relax by breathing with your belly [not your shoulders] and get some relaxing herbs.

you've got Ionophoresis and injections of botulin toxic to reduce sweating.

the simplest way to deal with it is via antiperspirant with aluminuim salts to reduce sweat and you can cut your hair to reduce the bacterial level which is responsible for odours.

also, thoracic simpatectomia is the surgical answer to hyperhydrosis.

4ec0fe4b4aab327f7efa2dfb06b032ff

(5145)

on June 01, 2012
at 12:07 AM

Cutting hair short (maybe not an option for females) will also help by making heat dissipation through the scalp easier.

1
40093252f13aab9e04e17b2fa4ff2740

on May 31, 2012
at 09:41 PM

Jen, I have no clue about the dietary or even a paleolithic solution, but I have had hyperhydrosis for many years,. Bad in all situations. I use a product called maxim (which you can get online). Its used every night before bed. It seems excessive, but I find it worth it since I am no longer embarrassed by excessive sweating.

1
5495f20862fee8ca6a3d6cf6ece99356

(387)

on May 31, 2012
at 04:58 PM

Hi Jen! There is a chance you could have a condition called hyperhydrosis, which basically means you simply sweat a lot, and of course that is amplified in situations that normally would bring about sweat, just lighter in most people. I have it, and it is absolutely a pain when trying to appear calm and collected. If you drink a lot of caffeine, drink less. Limit alcohol consumption, as I've found that to trigger next day occurances. If you are about to be interviewed, concentrate on breathing calmly. I used to sweat so much even at yoga I would require my own fan pointed at me! The plus side is this: With every bead of sweat, toxins are released, and I believe over the years it may have helped me in my journey from more self-destructive habits by cleansing, but that may be hogwash!

1
Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on May 31, 2012
at 12:53 PM

I used to have this happen to me a lot in high school. It improved on its own as I got older, more comfortable with myself, more confident, etc. Same used to happen to me much more at work, again until I became more comfortable/confident in what I was doing (e.g., presenting to audiences). I would guess that the more times you go through these situations that are uncomfortable, the more comfortable they will feel and the sweating should reduce. If it doesn't kill you, it makes you stronger (hormesis!). I think we all express our nervous energy in different ways, and sweating is just one of them.

65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on May 31, 2012
at 01:05 PM

Thanks Mike, I appreciate your personal experience! :)

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