4

votes

Are there downsides to h.pylori eradication?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 24, 2011 at 2:04 AM

Are there downsides to h.pylori eradication via the standard methods?

Ef4c5b09fdccf73be575d3a0c267fdd9

(2539)

on August 24, 2011
at 05:59 PM

And Olivia.. I did not pull the claim out of my ass. I have done extensive research into the gut flora and my own personal experience is that trying to eradicate a strain out of your gut is mostly not worth the time and effort unless you can be sure of it's eradication and have a solid plain to a. avoid fungal infections that follow antibiotics and b. have a solid plan to re-establish gut flora that you can be sure will do so. Otherwise you will have problems post-antibiotics.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on August 24, 2011
at 05:56 PM

Olivia - From the research I've done, I agree with Bill, and I would answer this question with something very similar to what he put. So your comment is useless.

Ef4c5b09fdccf73be575d3a0c267fdd9

(2539)

on August 24, 2011
at 05:53 PM

As NotPaleoMark says... the damage you will most certainly 100% do to your flora is not worth the much smaller chance that you will completely iradicate the bacteria.

6869a1f2294b3a717a53645589a91d18

(1689)

on August 24, 2011
at 04:51 PM

Ideally some sort of experiment where humans or animals underwent h.pylori removal and had their health suffer or benefit. I don't think high prevalence confirms healthfulness. 20 to 60% are infected with Toxoplasmosis but I doubt that's healthy. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2692860/

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 24, 2011
at 02:23 PM

""More than 50% of the world's population harbor H. pylori in their upper gastrointestinal tract". If the "part of the normal gut flora" was under question. As for antibiotics "Rising antibiotic resistance increases the need for a prevention strategy for the bacteria" All quotes from wiki which also mentiones studies about food (brussel sprouts, kimchi and green tea) and it's effect on H. Pylori What kind of evidence are you seeking free ?

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 24, 2011
at 02:19 PM

"More than 50% of the world's population harbor H. pylori in their upper gastrointestinal tract". If the "part of the normal gut flora" was under question. What kind of evidence are you seeking free ?

7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on August 24, 2011
at 12:00 PM

He won't be able to provide any, since he more or less just pulled that claim out of his ass.

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on August 24, 2011
at 06:20 AM

What are the standard methods?

6869a1f2294b3a717a53645589a91d18

(1689)

on August 24, 2011
at 05:58 AM

evidence please

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3 Answers

5
Ef4c5b09fdccf73be575d3a0c267fdd9

(2539)

on August 24, 2011
at 04:39 AM

Yes, antibiotics are very harmful in the scheme of things and H. Pylori, while pathogenic, is still normal human flora and itself is not the true problem... it's the imbalanced flora and the diet that allows it to thrive. Once you fix those issues the H.Pylori shouldnt be an issue.

6869a1f2294b3a717a53645589a91d18

(1689)

on August 24, 2011
at 05:58 AM

evidence please

7d0c3ea9bf8be00b93e6433d8f125ac3

(7540)

on August 24, 2011
at 12:00 PM

He won't be able to provide any, since he more or less just pulled that claim out of his ass.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on August 24, 2011
at 05:56 PM

Olivia - From the research I've done, I agree with Bill, and I would answer this question with something very similar to what he put. So your comment is useless.

Ef4c5b09fdccf73be575d3a0c267fdd9

(2539)

on August 24, 2011
at 05:59 PM

And Olivia.. I did not pull the claim out of my ass. I have done extensive research into the gut flora and my own personal experience is that trying to eradicate a strain out of your gut is mostly not worth the time and effort unless you can be sure of it's eradication and have a solid plain to a. avoid fungal infections that follow antibiotics and b. have a solid plan to re-establish gut flora that you can be sure will do so. Otherwise you will have problems post-antibiotics.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 24, 2011
at 02:23 PM

""More than 50% of the world's population harbor H. pylori in their upper gastrointestinal tract". If the "part of the normal gut flora" was under question. As for antibiotics "Rising antibiotic resistance increases the need for a prevention strategy for the bacteria" All quotes from wiki which also mentiones studies about food (brussel sprouts, kimchi and green tea) and it's effect on H. Pylori What kind of evidence are you seeking free ?

6869a1f2294b3a717a53645589a91d18

(1689)

on August 24, 2011
at 04:51 PM

Ideally some sort of experiment where humans or animals underwent h.pylori removal and had their health suffer or benefit. I don't think high prevalence confirms healthfulness. 20 to 60% are infected with Toxoplasmosis but I doubt that's healthy. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2692860/

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 24, 2011
at 02:19 PM

"More than 50% of the world's population harbor H. pylori in their upper gastrointestinal tract". If the "part of the normal gut flora" was under question. What kind of evidence are you seeking free ?

Ef4c5b09fdccf73be575d3a0c267fdd9

(2539)

on August 24, 2011
at 05:53 PM

As NotPaleoMark says... the damage you will most certainly 100% do to your flora is not worth the much smaller chance that you will completely iradicate the bacteria.

1
Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on August 24, 2011
at 06:07 PM

I don't know if there are any downsides to the actual eradication of H.P. However, the method and therefore the process used to eradicate it may be problematic depending on several factors. H.pylori can be a resident bacteria in a human, but it is when it is thrown out of balance that it could potentially become a serious problem. H.P. overgrowth can lead to ulcers and/or GERD and other issues. If you could snap your fingers and magically make all H.P. disappear from your gut, I think it would be appropriate to say that whatever role it was playing (that it now wouldn't be) might throw your gut flora off and it could take time to adjust. So it's hard to say that the eradication itself is what would cause the problem or if it's that the missing element that H.pylori was dabbling in while in your gut is the problem.

Here are 2 true statements:

People can live just fine with resident H.pylori

People can live just fine without resident H.pylori

If you suspect you have an hp overgrowth, you can test for it using the Urea breath test.

Or you can try Active Manuka Honey 15+ UMF.

0
2bdc990a200584a385650cf68475f095

on August 24, 2011
at 11:30 AM

I would say that the main problem was a very non selective (I'm not sure if H. Pylori has a narrow antibiotic) bacteria wipeout resulting in losing both "good" and "bad" bacteria and reestablish seems to quite an effort and takes extensive amounts of time.

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