4

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Antibiotics wipe out gut flora - Does that mean we go back to square one? (Our guts similar to New-born-babies?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 09, 2013 at 12:22 PM

The thought has been going through my mind ever since I screwed up my intestinal flora by taking several antibiotics. We all know that by doing so one does not only get rid of the bad bugs, but the beneficial bacteria get wiped out as well. By doing a GI Profile test provided by labs such as Metametrix, one can see the levels of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacteria present in the gut. Upon finding lack of any, one can supplement by taking probiotic capsules or by eating fermented food. The question that keeps haunting me is: What if we're looking at it completely wrong? What if we should consider a person's gut who just had a week's (or more) course of broad spectrum antibiotics, the same way we deal with a new-born's flora and the lacking thereof?. What if the point where it goes wong with everyone, is simply because we deny the fact that without a normal flora present, one must build one properly before consuming foods that were previously eaten pre-antibiotics. Do we feed new-borns meat, raw vegetables, and sugar immediately? No, after a good period of only breast milk, comes the introduction of soldis. But even then, gently and easy-to-digest-foods are introduced slowly and being extra cautious with raw veggies, sugars and starch. How come we own this knowledge when it comes to babies and their digestive capabilities and act accordingly, but we fail to give the period that comes post-antibiotic treatment the proper attention and diet? Should we avoid starch, sugar and raw foods during and post antibiotics until we re-establish our healthy flora? Is this the reason for many health problems post antibiotic treatment? From candida to digestion problems, do we need to look at our guts as if they were "clean sheets" and start from scratch building them? Maybe we're just all a bunch of babies after antibiotics and need to eat everything bland, cooked and mashed...

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on February 10, 2013
at 01:57 PM

When I was a kid my and my sister used to play with rabbit poos we found in the field, we called them "fairy cannonballs" Apparently mycobacteria in the soil are good for you?

3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on February 09, 2013
at 05:06 PM

I doubt it's necessary unless you've been on antibiotics for months at a time. Our GI tract is matured and thus the bacteria in there are already established. Antiotics are never 100% effective.

757f1ff864ea8f669d58e83cc1f1881b

(309)

on February 09, 2013
at 04:13 PM

True, which is one of the reasons non-breast-fed babies have a lot of catching up to do during their first years when it comes to building a healthy flora.

757f1ff864ea8f669d58e83cc1f1881b

(309)

on February 09, 2013
at 04:10 PM

That's exactly what I'm thinking. Kids build their flora by putting their hands in their mouths and playing with sand and soil. We'll we adults take probiotics, but we might as well go gardening. It's just about repopulating when the gut has been wiped clean.

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2 Answers

3
68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on February 09, 2013
at 02:46 PM

I always understood that babies picked up quite a lot of gut bacteria during the birthing process (which is often a little, ah, messy) and the rest from the wider world?

I would avoid sugars and starches but not raw foods, take strong probiotic capsules with enteric coating, and not be obsessive about hygiene (got to get bacteria from somewhere?)

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on February 10, 2013
at 01:57 PM

When I was a kid my and my sister used to play with rabbit poos we found in the field, we called them "fairy cannonballs" Apparently mycobacteria in the soil are good for you?

757f1ff864ea8f669d58e83cc1f1881b

(309)

on February 09, 2013
at 04:10 PM

That's exactly what I'm thinking. Kids build their flora by putting their hands in their mouths and playing with sand and soil. We'll we adults take probiotics, but we might as well go gardening. It's just about repopulating when the gut has been wiped clean.

3
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on February 09, 2013
at 12:28 PM

Refereeing carbs after a course of antibiotics does sound like a simplified gut biome waiting to happen. The milk given to newborns is rich in cholstrum(sp) and populates the gut with appropriate bacteria supposedly. After a course of antibodies I'd probably eat seafood, like oysters (not raw tbh) but I'm sure that other foods would be just as good if not better. And though I can't prove it, I agree that simple sugars after a round of antibodies is probably a bad idea, at least an inferior idea.

757f1ff864ea8f669d58e83cc1f1881b

(309)

on February 09, 2013
at 04:13 PM

True, which is one of the reasons non-breast-fed babies have a lot of catching up to do during their first years when it comes to building a healthy flora.

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