4

votes

Best white rice variety? (least anti-nutrients, lowest salicylates, most paleo)?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created June 20, 2012 at 1:52 AM

As the question suggests, I was in Whole Foods looking for some white rice.

I wanted to try organic, which limited my options a bit.

There was long-grain white, Jasmine, and a few other varieties.

I'm particularly interested if any type of rice would be lower in salicylates than others, but over-all: what has the least anti-nutrients and is most paleo?

Is the answer that it's a tie because all the bad parts have already been stripped away (hence: white rice)???

Thanks for any insights,

Mike

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on January 23, 2014
at 06:09 PM

Thanks for suggesting boiling in 6 cups water, then discarding extra to remove 45% of arsenic. That makes sense !!!

73405829e4cd62de86d52ef5c557dc42

on January 12, 2014
at 04:37 PM

You didn't miss anything. Not everyone is 100% strict and many believe white rice is a safe starch and the best source of carbs. I have been pretty low/no carb for the past month but when I need some carbs I go with white rice or sweet potatoes and the rice is generally quicker and easier and I love it so a few small servings here and there at night is an OK cheat for me

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on June 26, 2013
at 03:14 AM

actually, since posting this last year, I've moved on to a different hypothesis (not salicylates). Currently, I'm trying an oxalate trial.

44739854bd06eb5c32af5d33aa866864

(859)

on June 20, 2012
at 05:42 PM

I think the enriched rice contains folic acid (instead of folate) as well, which has been shown to cause problems: http://chriskresser.com/folate-vs-folic-acid I'd like to add in my vote for Basmati white rice as the best as well!

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on June 20, 2012
at 02:36 PM

I'm going out of my way to avoid the enriched products. I've read some bad stuff about some of the spray on vitamins.

7e6644836cdbcbe2b06307ff7db92d31

(693)

on June 20, 2012
at 12:25 PM

Thanks. I happened to buy California Basmati to provide carbs post-workout for cycling macros (had been LC). Glad I did from this. I rinsed until clear to remove free starch (recommended cooking method to keep grains from sticking).

Bcc4479de4f16939076e0a00e2db1261

(94)

on June 20, 2012
at 12:11 PM

I'm wondering the same thing. Whole Foods/Trader Joes Jasmine or Basmati white rice? Or should I buy the enriched white rice like uncle bens or carolina?

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on June 20, 2012
at 11:24 AM

that's good feedback. I'm no expert, so going with the "wisdom of the crowds" is something I do all the time!

0df0b1c6ae16bbb75b4a5efa3d876765

(2240)

on June 20, 2012
at 03:34 AM

I can't answer your question directly, but just wanted to mention I've tried several of the WF brand organic white rice varieties over the last 8 months and everyone in my house likes the Basmati the best.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on June 20, 2012
at 03:07 AM

Interesting!...

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10 Answers

best answer

9
0bc04a2ee661857e8458df34646e70ef

(319)

on June 20, 2012
at 02:55 AM

From: http://anthonycolpo.com/?p=2814

Glycemic index of rice varieties.

The GI of rice is largely determined by its amylose levels, not its fibre content. The varying amylose content of different rice varieties is why this grain shows such a wide range of scores on the GI charts, with high amylose varieties sporting significantly lower GI scores. Long grain rice strains have higher amylose contents than their short grain cousins, so wherever possible opt for long grain rices like Basmati and Doongara, as they tend to have lower GI scores than instant, converted and short-grain varieties[Williams][Miller]. Jasmine is an exception to the rule as it sports a higher GI despite its long grain status.

Minimizing arsenic in rice.

Numerous analyses of the arsenic content of rice have been published, and the results consistently show that Californian varieties contain lower levels of arsenic than rice grown in the southern US states of Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas. Previous arsenic-based pesticide use on cotton fields now being used for rice production is believed to be the culprit[Williams]. Internationally, rice from Europe (Italy, Spain, France) also shows comparatively high arsenic levels[Zavala][ Meharg].

What, if any, effect this has on human health is still a relatively understudied area, but I???d personally prefer to err on the side of caution. Along with avoiding brown rice (for reasons discussed above), I???d avoid rice from high-arsenic sources, and to further reduce arsenic content I???d use a high water:rice volume when cooking. A 2009 study found that a 6:1 water:rice ratio (i.e. using 6 cups of water to 1 cup of rice) removed 45% of arsenic in long-grain rice. The rice was boiled to eating texture and the remaining water discarded. Steaming was less consistent in reducing arsenic content, while low volume water cooking (2.5:1 water:rice ratio, boiled to dryness] failed to remove arsenic. Rinsing the rice prior to cooking produced a fourteen percent reduction in arsenic content, but the effect was only observed in basmati rice. The rinsing method employed was to place 100 grams of rice in 600 millilitres of distilled and deionised water, and agitate the mixture routinely for 3 minutes. The water was then drained, and the process repeated once more with a fresh batch of water[Raab]. An Indian study using similar water:rice ratios during cooking found similar results, but that a more extensive washing procedure (rinsing the rice 5-6 times until the discarded water became clear) removed 28% of arsenic[Sengupta].

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on June 20, 2012
at 03:07 AM

Interesting!...

7e6644836cdbcbe2b06307ff7db92d31

(693)

on June 20, 2012
at 12:25 PM

Thanks. I happened to buy California Basmati to provide carbs post-workout for cycling macros (had been LC). Glad I did from this. I rinsed until clear to remove free starch (recommended cooking method to keep grains from sticking).

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on January 23, 2014
at 06:09 PM

Thanks for suggesting boiling in 6 cups water, then discarding extra to remove 45% of arsenic. That makes sense !!!

2
7f8bc7ce5c34aae50408d31812c839b0

(2698)

on June 20, 2012
at 02:13 PM

I think the real choice amoungst white rice is between non-enriched and enriched. Paul Jaminet recently did a blog on the effect the niacin enrichment the government forces in rice grown here may be bad for you in the long run.

You can tell an enriched rice becasue the nutrient panel will show iron present, which is also one of the nutrient put into white rice. Rinsing an enriched rice will get rid of some of the enrichment.

So if you don't want the enrichment buy rice that shows no iron content.

Personally, I love Traders Joes organic Basmati (no enrichment) with ghee and egg yolks mixed in. Its really quite delicious.

0
736662d9fd6314d426cc6de1896aa045

(175)

on January 23, 2014
at 10:02 PM

Whatever you choose, boil it with added bone broth + some turmeric etc.

The resistant starch people say parboiled is best. Then refrigerate it.

0
8a420458eeda99cd39225cc474e933c3

on January 12, 2014
at 02:33 PM

Isn't rice a grain and not on paleo? I'm confused, did I miss something?

73405829e4cd62de86d52ef5c557dc42

on January 12, 2014
at 04:37 PM

You didn't miss anything. Not everyone is 100% strict and many believe white rice is a safe starch and the best source of carbs. I have been pretty low/no carb for the past month but when I need some carbs I go with white rice or sweet potatoes and the rice is generally quicker and easier and I love it so a few small servings here and there at night is an OK cheat for me

0
Medium avatar

on January 12, 2014
at 05:27 AM

Jasmine only! Because I have SIBO and Jasmine rice has the lowest fermentation potential, meaning it will not sit and feed the bacteria in my small intestine.The addition of this rice into my diet has been very beneficial. I load it up with ghee--delish!!

0
E3f4c35a21b0c5670716fabfe33b372f

on June 25, 2013
at 11:51 PM

Please research! Not sure why you are avoiding salicylates, but if it's due to allergy/intolerance, you should know that many types of rice contain salicylates. Stick with the regular variety, please. Basmati, jasmine and wild rices etc contain salicylates. I've had terrible reaction to rice pasta not knowing they had used basmati to make it.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on June 26, 2013
at 03:14 AM

actually, since posting this last year, I've moved on to a different hypothesis (not salicylates). Currently, I'm trying an oxalate trial.

0
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on June 20, 2012
at 02:26 PM

It is very good that you are carbohydrates, but I don't think it really matters all that much which type of white rice you use. I'd just buy the kind I like the most. Jasmine rice smells really nice when cooked, so I'd probably get that one most of the time. Sushi rice is good too if you're making some homemade sushi with friends, which is really fun btw.

0
189b5f92563aff6742ae46ebec950977

(217)

on June 20, 2012
at 01:34 PM

I know this doesn't answer the question, but you should really experiment and figure out what works best for you.... for me, it has a lot to do with mycotoxins and just how my body responds to the grain... so white rice works well for me, and brown rice is nasty, and going on the paleo route, it's never considered part of my normal food intake, but something I eat for a goodish cheat meal.

0
91882203467f64f68f25f58f1caeee68

(1017)

on June 20, 2012
at 11:53 AM

Isn't all rice (and I guess all grains) low in salicylates? In fact I think grains have 0 salicylates, so that eliminates that variable from making your choice.

0
99ac392257e444e014be6d4da6a900e4

(1036)

on June 20, 2012
at 02:33 AM

Dr. Harris uses store brand rice crisps for his rice consumption so my guess is it doesn't matter much.

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