5

votes

Haplogroup research?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 02, 2010 at 1:37 AM

I know I'm not the first person to think of this, but looking over the archives here I don't see any mention of paleo people doing one of those genetic tests to discover their haplogroup in the context of personal paleo research.

I'm having mine done anyway because I'm curious (results in 4-6 weeks, sigh) but I'm also interested to see what turns up on figuring out the likely diet of my particular haplogroup. Has anyone here gained any insights or made any adjustments to their paleo lifestyle as a result of having that information?

There are paleo-approved* foods that some of us cannot eat (I can't do most nightshades, most crucifers or a lot of pork) and some of us are eating paleo-not-approved* foods without apparent setbacks or issues. The "everybody's different" explanation is perfectly valid as far as I can tell, but maybe some of that "difference" is genetic at the deep level?

Thanks again for your comments.

*For lack of a better term.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 28, 2011
at 08:20 PM

Hrm that would explain it. Tells how ignorant I am on that. :)

1471beca8e3adff4ae2f89d10e5f7acb

(6550)

on January 28, 2011
at 06:06 PM

If Elle is a woman, she may only have her maternal haplogroup.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 28, 2011
at 04:54 PM

Did the 23andme test as well, but I don't see a single haplogroup (there's it's maternal and paternal line haplogroups). Which one are you looking at?

Ae011d9f1c8654ea66854ca2a977c397

(1165)

on June 04, 2010
at 06:24 AM

It's not just Caucasians. Asians and Middle Easteners also have Neanderthal DNA in them, between 1-4%. But you are right, Africans are "pure human." I also saw a theory that some South East Asians might contain some Homo floresiensis DNA but this is yet to be proven

101b3a5c96d313d22262f65bdff20acf

(539)

on June 03, 2010
at 11:43 PM

I'm waiting for that too, actually, and missed "DNA" day by exactly one day. Grrr.

6fa48935d439390e223b9a053a62c981

(1676)

on June 03, 2010
at 02:06 AM

That recent evidence remains controversial, but even if true, all Hominidae came from Africa anyway. The present estimate is that modern humans share(d) 99% of their DNA with Neanderthals (I believe it's 98% with chimpanzees). So even if true, the genetic difference between a neaderthal-ized caucasian and non-neanderthal-ized African would be insignificant, on the order of the genetic difference between a blond and a brunette.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on June 03, 2010
at 12:38 AM

@Mark -- but we're not -- recent evidence suggests that Africans don't have any Neanderthal admixture, while Caucasians do.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on June 02, 2010
at 01:19 PM

I haven't had that test myself, but my Jewish relatives are this line. It makes sense...we always joked that some of us looked Mongolian.

101b3a5c96d313d22262f65bdff20acf

(539)

on June 02, 2010
at 04:32 AM

@Patrik - Thanks for the recommendation - that Cochran book looks promising!

101b3a5c96d313d22262f65bdff20acf

(539)

on June 02, 2010
at 04:31 AM

@tattooedchef - I compared four or five of the big names and settled on Genebase (www.genebase.com) for no particular reason. I'm pretty excited, though, at the prospect of 'hacking' your own genetic history for an optimal Paleo diet.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on June 02, 2010
at 03:46 AM

@Jennie -- Great question. I think you are on to something. And I think just research holds promise for many. Have you read the 10,000 Year Explosion? They touch upon differences between different heritages when it comes to things like genetic diseases -- I think many of the same principles may apply to lifestyle and diet.

8347d512bca9b034d53da40dab8cd21c

(2517)

on June 02, 2010
at 02:22 AM

Jennie, who did you go through to get this test? My curiosity's piqued!

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6 Answers

1
893bfe57c21ad460d95b5be83dda4225

(10)

on January 28, 2011
at 03:35 PM

I've done the same. The 23andMe test is great, but I'm having a rough time finding dietary information on my specific haplogroup. Actually I've had a hard time finding a dietary rundown on haplogroups in general. If anyone has found anything like that I'd love to know about it.

I came out in haplogroup W5.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 28, 2011
at 04:54 PM

Did the 23andme test as well, but I don't see a single haplogroup (there's it's maternal and paternal line haplogroups). Which one are you looking at?

1471beca8e3adff4ae2f89d10e5f7acb

(6550)

on January 28, 2011
at 06:06 PM

If Elle is a woman, she may only have her maternal haplogroup.

5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 28, 2011
at 08:20 PM

Hrm that would explain it. Tells how ignorant I am on that. :)

1
6fa48935d439390e223b9a053a62c981

(1676)

on June 02, 2010
at 12:04 PM

I considered doing this myself a few years ago. It's really fascinating, but I was turned off by the cost. I think it was $199 at the time for the basic package. For more money you could have other related tests done (I don't remember exactly what they were now). But basically, as a caucasian, my deep ancestors left Africa and turned left at some point and wound up in cloudy, high-latitude Europe where they lost melanin to allow more Vit D production.

So what will the test tell me that I don't already know? I suppose that knowing my haplogroup will tell me that I am more closely related to some people than to others, but this is basically just my recent genetic history. It might tell me that my ancestors were parked in Eastern Europe for a while. But even farther back in time, we're all African anyways, regardless of haplogroup.

If it were less expensive I'd have the tests done, because it would be incredibly interesting to know the "route" my ancestors took. I guess its a matter of weighing the costs against the curiosity.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on June 03, 2010
at 12:38 AM

@Mark -- but we're not -- recent evidence suggests that Africans don't have any Neanderthal admixture, while Caucasians do.

6fa48935d439390e223b9a053a62c981

(1676)

on June 03, 2010
at 02:06 AM

That recent evidence remains controversial, but even if true, all Hominidae came from Africa anyway. The present estimate is that modern humans share(d) 99% of their DNA with Neanderthals (I believe it's 98% with chimpanzees). So even if true, the genetic difference between a neaderthal-ized caucasian and non-neanderthal-ized African would be insignificant, on the order of the genetic difference between a blond and a brunette.

Ae011d9f1c8654ea66854ca2a977c397

(1165)

on June 04, 2010
at 06:24 AM

It's not just Caucasians. Asians and Middle Easteners also have Neanderthal DNA in them, between 1-4%. But you are right, Africans are "pure human." I also saw a theory that some South East Asians might contain some Homo floresiensis DNA but this is yet to be proven

1
C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on June 02, 2010
at 02:57 AM

I am haplogroup Q1b, which is about 5% of all Ashkenazi Jews. Most Q* are of Siberian/Aleutian/Native American lineage. So I guess genetically I am disposed to a diet of tasty animals. Apparently my tribe went went west instead of east. The only dietary problem I have is fluid milk -- causes severe GI distress -- but yogurt/cheese are no problem.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on June 02, 2010
at 01:19 PM

I haven't had that test myself, but my Jewish relatives are this line. It makes sense...we always joked that some of us looked Mongolian.

0
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 28, 2011
at 04:57 PM

Did the 23andme.com test as well. The latest thing I've found out more on is not so much haplogroup information, but Methylation information. Tied into whether I can smell it after I eat Asparagus. Apparently there's a mutation on the MTHFR gene that means that you don't clear toxins as fast by methlyating them (thus can smell it after you eat the Asparagus). Not world shattering, but does mean it's wiser to take specific types of folate to offset it (since homocysteine levels will be higher). Apparently my mutation means that I methylate at 30% the rate of normal...

0
5d80aff9563aae9d350e632b20905ec1

(105)

on June 03, 2010
at 11:24 AM

I took advantage of 23andMe when they had the $99 sale (for "DNA Day" - April 23) for both the health and ancestry tests. My ancestry tests basically confirmed what I already know - my ancestors come from Europe. The health tests were very interesting, though, revealing I'm at 4x risk for Celiac disease than average, likely to be able to digest dairy with no problems, etc.

As far as ancestry goes, 23andMe becomes more useful the more people join - you can find distant relatives and, through them, learn more about your own background.

0
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on June 02, 2010
at 04:35 PM

Sounds like what I was asking here Resources for Regional Ancestry

someone recommended 23andme when they have a $100 sale so I'm playing the waiting game now

101b3a5c96d313d22262f65bdff20acf

(539)

on June 03, 2010
at 11:43 PM

I'm waiting for that too, actually, and missed "DNA" day by exactly one day. Grrr.

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