8

votes

What is your experience with egg allergies?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 14, 2011 at 7:33 PM

I've eaten eggs my entire life, but since becoming Paleo over the past year, I've experienced a tenfold upswing in my egg eating. As a part of my routine, I've been eating 5-6 pasture raised eggs purchased from a local farmer. Until recently, I haven't experienced any issues with this part of my diet.

About a month ago, I experienced increased upset stomach issues, which progressed a couple weeks later to stomach pains and eventually vomiting if I ate eggs. This even continued after switching egg producers, buying them from another farmer at my local farmer's market. This sucks so bad, because it's been such an important part of my diet in making sure that I could get a cheap, high-quality source of fat and protein in the morning.

My wife and I have a two year old who has been diagnosed with a severe egg allergy, so this seems to be a logical conclusion: that it's just taken me 34 years to develop this issue.

So I want to know if anyone here has had experience with eggs in this manner? Is it possible to develop an egg allergy late in life?

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on January 23, 2012
at 07:17 AM

That is awesome!!!

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on December 19, 2011
at 05:02 AM

10 answers and counting and nobody upvoted the question as useful?? baffling.

F5e7938e6fe43e705d36ae30e6327fc2

(50)

on September 16, 2011
at 06:01 AM

Woo-hoo! I actually gave egg yolks alone a try with great success today. I ate two of them boiled, and although I missed eating the whites, it looks like I'm going to have to throw those whites in my compost heap for a while.

41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on September 15, 2011
at 06:55 AM

Ooh! Thanks for this! Sounds like I should give them a try again. My local Whole Foods sells duck eggs and they are awesome. (For anyone in the surrounding Seattle area, they are in the egg section on the very top shelf. You kind of have to search for them. They are easy to overlook.)

F5e7938e6fe43e705d36ae30e6327fc2

(50)

on September 14, 2011
at 09:59 PM

Duck eggs! Ha... love it... I know that I've seen quail eggs at the local health food store, but I've yet to encounter anyone in central Iowa raising duck eggs. Thanks for the tip.

F5e7938e6fe43e705d36ae30e6327fc2

(50)

on September 14, 2011
at 09:57 PM

Thanks Vern. Yes... It's tough to avoid, but we just eat more grass-fed beef and pastured pork to keep him happy. :)

Ffff513ac686cd18c840ee12c79357ed

(1183)

on September 14, 2011
at 08:15 PM

Empathetic comment. My son, (who is nearing 4) has a severe egg allergy and all I can say is I'm sorry. It's one of the hardest ingredients to avoid. I am certain that it's possible to develop allergies late in life. Also possible to overcome them... and for them to reappear. Bodies are weird.

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18 Answers

best answer

6
Medium avatar

on September 14, 2011
at 09:22 PM

I too developed an allergy to egg whites as a result of increased exposure. My solution has been to hard boil them and discard the whites and only eat the yolks. I don't experience any stomach upset this way and I get the feeling that the reduced oxidation and cooking temperatures leaves most of what I want out of the yolk intact.

I used to be able to eat them scrambled with no problem, but I think eating them for a while hard-boiled in large amounts has made that even too much. There may be a period of time of egg white avoidance that allows us to return to them, but give yolks alone a try.

Edit: I wonder if the increased surface area of our guts as a result of gluten avoidance has made us more susceptible to the offending proteins or if our immune system has come off high alert for the same reason and is less likely/able to mount a proper defense against the proteins. It may also be an example of hormesis where the constant stress of gluten intake actually made us better able to handle the other stressors that come with whole egg ingestion. Perhaps this gets out of whack in those who don't avoid gluten and becomes a problem. Finally, it may be that our pastured eggs have more of these offending proteins due to the fact that these chickens are in better health.

F5e7938e6fe43e705d36ae30e6327fc2

(50)

on September 16, 2011
at 06:01 AM

Woo-hoo! I actually gave egg yolks alone a try with great success today. I ate two of them boiled, and although I missed eating the whites, it looks like I'm going to have to throw those whites in my compost heap for a while.

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on January 23, 2012
at 07:17 AM

That is awesome!!!

6
60af23519906aa54b742ffc17477c3d3

(1186)

on September 14, 2011
at 08:45 PM

DUCK eggs are generally safe for anyone who doesnt have a severe (anaphylactic) reaction to eggs. They're harder to find, but if you already get your eggs from a farm, rather than a supermarket it shouldn't be much harder. I developed an egg allergy as a result of overconsumption a few years ago. I don't believe you can "create" an allergy, but rather make a sensitivity worse by eating copious amounts of one food. I had the same issue with peanuts and avocados. Anything more than a small serving every once in a while and I get respiratory symptoms. Small amounts are fine (eggs in paleo pancakes etc) but I still can't eat the chicken eggs on their own.

F5e7938e6fe43e705d36ae30e6327fc2

(50)

on September 14, 2011
at 09:59 PM

Duck eggs! Ha... love it... I know that I've seen quail eggs at the local health food store, but I've yet to encounter anyone in central Iowa raising duck eggs. Thanks for the tip.

41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on September 15, 2011
at 06:55 AM

Ooh! Thanks for this! Sounds like I should give them a try again. My local Whole Foods sells duck eggs and they are awesome. (For anyone in the surrounding Seattle area, they are in the egg section on the very top shelf. You kind of have to search for them. They are easy to overlook.)

3
742ff8ba4ff55e84593ede14ac1c3cab

(3536)

on September 15, 2011
at 12:49 AM

I use to eat a lot of eggs when I first started a paleo type diet, and I blamed my fatigue and mood swings on the diet itself, but closely after removing eggs from my diet, as an experiment, my fatigue and mood swings disappeared.

3
F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on September 14, 2011
at 09:25 PM

Before I went gluten free (also pre-paleo and pre-tummy troubles from antibiotic use) I could eat eggs all I wanted to. After going gluten free I found out pretty fast that some pretty severe symptoms I was experiencing were from eggs. Now after quite a bit of time as full paleo, I tried reintroducing (farmers market eggs) and even just a couple of eggs is enough to renew the exact symptoms I had before. Sad!!

Update: Found out that it matters, with more effort than I was already putting in (buying only freerange etc), that what the chicken are eating matters big time. Now I can eat 2 dozen eggs a week with no issues at all because I buy eggs from free range chickens that are not supplement with soy feed. I already knew I was super allergic to soy, but I didn't think that would effect the contents of eggs, but it really does.

2
0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

on November 11, 2011
at 05:32 PM

I have a curious history with eggs, myself. From childhood I had a sensitivity to them and my mother didn't use them much in cooking except as incidental on the rare occasions she baked anything. My symptoms after eating a hard boiled egg here and there were mild to moderate nausea for a day or two, with headaches.

I outgrew the sensitivity eventually and by my mid-twenties I could eat them on a semi-regular basis without a problem, though one time on a hiking trip I wolfed five or six eggs at a sitting and got a milder version of the childhood tummy ache.

Then around age 30 I got my one (and only) flu shot and was sick as the proverbial dog for about four months. I had an immediate reaction to the shot and was kept for observation and to make sure I got fluids, etc. I also couldn't go near an egg again after this incident without the old and familiar nausea, cramping and general unease. (I'm told that the flu shot is, or was, cultured in a base of egg white, and now they ask on the pre-shot questionnaire whether or not you are currently or ever have been sensitive to eggs.)

That took about five years to ease off and I've been eating eggs regularly ever since with no problems.

2
E5103bd115084c001999682686069a20

on September 14, 2011
at 11:35 PM

Exact same experience! I Just stopped eating them.

2
9d8b1ca66aba8d9fa784689c222615c6

on September 14, 2011
at 10:47 PM

I agree with Ashley. Constant eating of anything can lead to an allergy or sensitivity at any age. I understand it is usually the white that one is allergic to. I switched to duck eggs and am fine with them. Look on line if you are not near a farmer....more expensive because of the shipping, but the duck eggs are twice as large or more, than chicken eggs.

1
Ba53ef5719636aceb378af2b69ae5403

on January 23, 2012
at 05:33 AM

Egg allergy is a type of food allergy. These allergy symptoms are quite common among children around the 5 years. The most common symptoms are skin reaction such as swelling of the tongue, rashes and throat infections. Egg Allergy Symptoms

1
8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

on December 19, 2011
at 12:02 AM

None in my family thankfully - parents, brother, husband, me. We eat about 6-12 eggs/week. Usually they are whole - both white and yolk.

1
743a0bd809771794ccc2a3f8f60290a8

on November 11, 2011
at 05:52 AM

I love eggs and I eat them like almost everyday. A few years ago, I developed skin rashes because of eggs so what I did was limit my daily intake to weekly and sometimes none in a week. rashes gone and I basically forgot that i was allergic to eggs. just recently I got addicted again on eating eggs and voila! hello to skin rashes again. :(

1
22424c9eef944ade83d4e4ffda907056

(1402)

on September 15, 2011
at 12:27 AM

I used to eat egg whites and they would give me horrible smelling farts (but nothing noticable beyond that).

Then I occasionally would buy eggs and eat 4 or 6 at a time but never really ate them regularly. Then one night I had 6 and the following morning I had 6 and it flushed my system out, never had anything like that before. Then I didn't have them for a while. More recently I started having 4 for breakfast every day and (I've ruled most everything else out as main suspects) caused constipation. Almost seems like I created a problem with them when I had that dozen within ~14 hours.

0
43240ff1994b70b72b95fae78fbafccf

on June 24, 2014
at 07:52 AM

I am 32 and have been violently allergic to eggs all my life... or so I thought. Turns out it's chicken eggs that I am allergic to after I tried duck eggs (scrambled) for the first time last week and did not get sick. A revelation!

I found this post while Googling why I have... emissions... that rival a long decaying corpse after eating two poached duck eggs. Thanks to you guys I know why. But after 32 years of suffering and finding my liberation in duck eggs, I am not willing to give it up.

I have been trying different ways to cook them. First trying scrambling one egg with potatoes, red bell pepper and tomatoes... no -ahem "issue". I then had sunny side up, one egg, and slightly gassy, but bc my IBS that is par so no big. I did not have any veggies, just toast.

Then I had the two poached eggs with only one egg's volume worth of homefries. BIG mistake. Two hours later, I was peeling paint faster than an acetone steamer.

I had an egg omelet this morning with potatoes, mushroom and green onions. No problems. I think I have stumbled upon something here.

If the consistency has anything to do with it:

Maybe scrambled and omelet pose a lesser risk to the noses of those around me bc they are more solid/ intermixed with egg whites and yolk. Poached and even sunnyside up may be doing my tear ducts more harm than good. I'm going to test this with an attempt at soft boiled vs the results I get with medium and hard boiled.

Assuming consistency has nothing to do with it:

Chicken eggs are acidic where duck eggs are alkaline. That's what makes the allergic difference after all. Here's the clinker; potatoes, tomatoes, bell peppers, egg plants, etc. are all things I have eaten with my eggs. I haven't emmited noctious gas when I do. These foods are nightshades. Nightshades are alkaloids. So, I am thinking like=>like. As long as I eat nightshade foods with my eggs (now making "eggplant" way more ironically funny) I shouldn't be able to apply for a job at the local natural gas company, Lol.

If all of the above are a factor, there has got to be a "breath-of-fresh-air" sweet spot between all of the variable things.

What do you guys think?!

0
C7435b321b3fccfdc36f0f25083f756e

on August 22, 2013
at 07:32 AM

Ive been paleo 8 months and increased egg intake (organic from trader joes) although recently bought these organic ones from cosco and got SO ALLERGIC, so i stopped and today i just ate 1 and again have a runny nose and sneezing like crazy, i hope its these specific eggs, maybe those chickens were fed something im allergic to? i never was allergic to the other eggs! :(

0
511a4a92c7ae5ea0d6056bf299d2da42

on April 05, 2013
at 02:43 PM

I too ate eggs my whole life, stopped when I fell pregnant as even the sight of them made me feel sick, after giving birth to my Son I found out I developed an allergy to eggs (aged 25). This allergy lasted apox 8 months then one day I accidentally ate a product containing eggs and was fine, so the next day I made an omelette and again was fine, it just seemed like the allergy had vanished. The doc thinks its probably because my Son has an egg allergy (he's only 9 months old so too young to try it to see) and he briely passed it on to me while I was pregnant with him. Obviously not the same as your story but just an example that allergies can vanish as quick as they came about.

Nicola :)

0
A88201b6f08d2f339272a2db307e9873

on January 08, 2013
at 03:50 PM

I had an anaphylactic reaction to undercooked egg white when a was younger. I thought that eating well cooked whites were fine until I discovered that my small patch of eczema cleared up when I stopped eating so many. If I stop eating eggs altogether, will I then have a severe reaction if I eat some?

Currently I have one well done fried egg at the weekend.

0
Dc390669a4deedec2f508c07e2333956

on October 17, 2012
at 01:52 PM

Totally.. I'm in the same boat as you. I got on the paleo train an was really seeing benefits with the diet; I also ate eggs every morning, and after about 6 months of being paleo I became intolerant to them; I would get stomach cramping, nausea, and diahhrea every time I tried to eat them. What's really weird is that I ate the same amount of eggs before becoming paleo for about 4 years, it was just after becoming paleo that I stopped eating oatmeal in the morning with my eggs and starting eating blackberries instead.. and the intolerance only developed after I made the switch to paleo. After that blow, I got off the paleo train because I felt so lost without being able to eat eggs for breakfast. Lol now I'm on oat bran and nut butter for breakfast.

0
4d6aa1a676240b15dc569ff8ade0500f

(2546)

on January 23, 2012
at 10:18 PM

i found myself one day just not wanting eggs anymore -- they seems like the most unappealing food EVER (despite the fact that i'd loved eating them daily for over a year). my body just didn't them, so i changed breakfasts, and about 4 months later, i was in the mood for them again. i've been eating them almost every day since (about a year).

0
C2450eb7fa11b37473599caf93b461ef

on January 23, 2012
at 11:01 AM

This doesn't pertain to the part of your question about developing allergies late in life, but I noticed how your problem started after increasing your use of eggs. I have a six year old who tested negative for a scratch test to eggs, but we still think she has some sort of egg intolerance because every time she goes on an egg bender (eggs every day for a week or so), she has an outbreak of eczema. She can eat food with eggs in it, or an off-day of egg eating, and be fine. It's the stretch of eating eggs daily that does it to her. Perhaps your issue is similar. What if you cut the eggs entirely a couple of weeks and then reintroduced them? It would help your body heal and serve as a food challenge test. Then, if you're OK with them, use them moderately.

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