1

votes

Technique for purifying ghee?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created February 27, 2012 at 11:02 AM

Hi hackers,

there are some commercial brands of ghee which claim to be absolutely free of milk protein - and indeed, I bought one of them and tolerated it well even in large amounts (I have an IgE mediated allergy to milk protein). Unfortunately it's quite pricey and so I wanted to make my own clarified butter.

I carefully followed the instructions and after the butterfat was completely clear I poured it into a coffee filter. The resulting liquid had no obvious impurities and I left it to cool. It tasted terrific but my stomach got really angry afterwards.

The question is: How do commercial ghee producers manage to clear their ghee in such a way, that even trace amounts are filtered out. What can I do to make such a pure butterfat myself? Any ideas how to clarify the clarified butter?

Thanks :)

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on February 29, 2012
at 08:04 AM

Great link, thanks!

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on February 28, 2012
at 04:29 PM

I'll try it and tell you, thanks ;)

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on February 28, 2012
at 10:32 AM

Great idea! After filtering, I could let it carefully cool and cut the top and bottom layer to get rid of the remaining invisible dairy parts.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on February 27, 2012
at 12:21 PM

Thomy, here are some nicely done instructions for making ghee. http://www.thenourishinggourmet.com/2008/06/making-ghee.html I don't know if it is possible using cheesecloth layers or coffee filters to get out all the milk solids.

  • E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

    asked by

    (2384)
  • Views
    4.8K
  • Last Activity
    1410D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

5 Answers

2
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on February 27, 2012
at 11:24 AM

You could buy premade ghee, and if you don't have access to grassfed cow butter, this might be a better source.

I'm guessing they simmer it until the solids separate, some float to the top, some fall to the bottom, the top layer is skimmed, then you'd filter through a coffee filter.

If you're sensitive, you could repeat the process by filtering it multiple times. What kind of filter are you using? Hopefully, it's a paper coffee filter, and not a gold mesh one.

So, they could be using better filters, or they could be using a centrifuge.

If you can't make, or find a non-reactive ghee, you could always switch to another fat, such as coconut oil.

1
2a0f1afde303eadc422d015fc22f7512

(1118)

on February 28, 2012
at 09:12 PM

just clarifying the butter manually does not remove all traces of milk parts (i don't know my science but i know some of the alergy inducing stuff is in the water in the butter not just the milk solids). I think keeping it heated longer to cook off the water as well as seperate the solids woudl be beneficial.

this link explains how ghee is manufactured. I got lost partway through but it might answer your question!

http://www.fnbnews.com/article/detnews.asp?articleid=16950&sectionid=40

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on February 29, 2012
at 08:04 AM

Great link, thanks!

1
284213562569be43dfda0ad40914da6f

on February 28, 2012
at 04:16 PM

tell me if this angers your stomach ( this is non-flavored flexible-use ghee):

  1. unsalted butter ( don't have the dough for pastured so I don't use it)
  2. sauce pan
  3. if using medium heat, this will take 30minutes, if on low, think more towards 45m.
  4. you get clarified butter after 15 minutes on medium--this is NOT ghee.
  5. if you wait until the solution has stopped making noises and most of the solids (the white stuff that came up) has descended and turned dark brown-reddish-black, that is ghee.
  6. pour through cloth, paper (i use coffee filters) into a heat-capable container--i use a mesh splash-guard to support the filters. I use two metal containers with the bottom one containing ice/salt to cool it within an hour-unnecessary but i'm impatient.

now THAT's ghee. It should be anywhere from a dark yellow to light yellow color depending on how long you've let those solids cook in the bottom. It is possible, i've heard, to let this go too far but I've never been tempted to see what that looks like. You need to watch this process so do it when you're in the house, have time to putter about and be at ease.

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on February 28, 2012
at 04:29 PM

I'll try it and tell you, thanks ;)

1
887a9c6c0ee243584548f02d45c439a6

(415)

on February 28, 2012
at 07:02 AM

How are you making it exactly?

Normally, I make it in the oven (120-130C (250-265F) - last time, I made it from 2kg block and it took over 2 hours to separate and settle) and just clean the top crust and pour it very carefully until I get to the solids. At that point, I just throw the rest away and don't try to filter it to get every last drop of fat out of it.

If I wanted to make it more pure, I'd probably let it cool separated and then cut those solids away with a knife. Every movement with the bowl might be disrupting and mixing it a little.

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on February 28, 2012
at 10:32 AM

Great idea! After filtering, I could let it carefully cool and cut the top and bottom layer to get rid of the remaining invisible dairy parts.

1
6e42d9a1439df96de337c0caa481a00a

(20)

on February 27, 2012
at 02:08 PM

I know your question is about making ghee, but you could always call up the one of the highest quality all grass-fed ghee manufacturers in the us and ask them if they have any suggestions: ancient organics ghee. It is absolutely amazing stuff and I have never tasted another ghee quite like it. My mother who normally can't stand ghee just loves the stuff.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!